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Thread: adjusting the bobbin winder

  1. #1
    Junior Member heart of Dixie's Avatar
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    adjusting the bobbin winder

    I need to know and I hope I can explain what I am asking so you will understand.
    When you wind a bobbin on a featherweight you turn the small handle on the wheel to disengage the needle so it doesn't move up and down when your winding a bobbin. When I turn the wheel it doesn't disengage it. Is there some way to adjust something so this will happen.
    Thanks for your input
    God is good all the time dlprecisionquilting.com

  2. #2
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    I've heard that sometimes this is because a washer has been replaced incorrectly. To fix it, remove the small handle on the wheel by unscrewing its screw. Then, remove that round, washer looking thing with the three prongs and turn it over and install it in the other direction. Return the small handle wheel by screwing in its screw. Hopefully, now turning it will disengage the needle action.

  3. #3
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    One of the biggest causes for the hand wheel not disengaging is gummed up oil between the hand wheel and the main shaft. You should remove the wheel, clean the inside of the shaft bore and the shaft thoroughly then put one drop of oil on it and reinstall the hand wheel. I always mark the stop motion clutch washer and shaft with a sharpie so I can be sure to put it back the way it came off.
    That usually fixes the problem.

    Miriam had an old 99K she was curious about putting a Chinese repro spoked hand wheel on so she could turn it into a hand crank.
    But the hand wheel would not come off. We had to oil with Tri-Flow and let it sit for a while. After that it just slipped off.
    So that's my theory and I'm stickin to it.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    One of the biggest causes for the hand wheel not disengaging is gummed up oil between the hand wheel and the main shaft. You should remove the wheel, clean the inside of the shaft bore and the shaft thoroughly then put one drop of oil on it and reinstall the hand wheel. I always mark the stop motion clutch washer and shaft with a sharpie so I can be sure to put it back the way it came off.
    That usually fixes the problem.

    Miriam had an old 99K she was curious about putting a Chinese repro spoked hand wheel on so she could turn it into a hand crank.
    But the hand wheel would not come off. We had to oil with Tri-Flow and let it sit for a while. After that it just slipped off.
    So that's my theory and I'm stickin to it.

    Joe
    I heartily agree, Joe - I've seen all kinds of gunk in those - some times you have a horrible time getting the hand wheels off due to dried up gunky oil. There was a Singer 401 I opened up had a pond of oil in there - not dried, but it was a real mess. The other thing I have seen on those old machines is a broken case and a bent shaft for the hand wheel. Be careful picking up those old cases - pick up from the bottom - the old glues may not hold. Oh those bent ones are more than hard to repair.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  5. #5
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    You know I have had the same problem with several vintage machines including FWs. After cleaning and oiling the machine good - you are ready to wind a bobbin. Go ahead and start the process, but use your left hand to stop/hold (going slow on the bobbin winding) the up down motion of the needle bar with the thump screw that holds the needle in. The first time I wind a bobbin on a vintage machine I start very slow and hold the needle bar to make sure it does not move while I am winding the bobbin. That usually fixes my problems and the needle bar will not move after that first bobbin wind. If you can't stop the needle bar, you will then have to do what Joe and Miriam suggest and take the HW off to clean, but I'd try holding it steady first to see if you can fix the problem without taking the HW and washer off.

    Nancy
    Last edited by BoJangles; 01-06-2013 at 05:58 AM.

  6. #6
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    I solved a mess of bobbin winding problems with my 1941 Singer by buying a Sidewinder----a little machine that only winds bobbins. While my machine would still wind a bobbin if I worked with it long enough, the SideWinder can wind about one bobbin per two minutes with no hassles. It's about $30 unless you catch a good sale at Michaels or JoAnn or Hancocks like I did. Definitely worth the lack of stress and frustration on my part!
    Mistakes are just opportunities to invent a new quilting technique!

  7. #7
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    The sidewinders are handy gadgets, but a gummed up hand wheel can be a pain in the but. Use the sidewinder but clean up the machine as well.

    Joe

  8. #8
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    my theory is that the oil in there has more friction than most places - maybe burns in or something - it sure does get hard in there. I've had to use solvent to get some of them clean.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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