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Thread: Baer & Rempel Phoenix 250 Treadle

  1. #1
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Baer & Rempel Phoenix 250 Treadle

    Hi there gurus

    I have an opportunity to purchase a 1952 Phoenix 250 treadle - the only information I could find was here:
    http://needlebar.org/main~nb/makers/...rempel/br.html
    It is described as: "Small type, central bobbin"
    What does this mean?

    I just want to have a better idea about what I'm looking at before I go and see it tomorrow. I was actually looking for a table to mount another machine head around the same vintage (a Singer 328 - SS/ZZ) and I'm presuming the Phoenix will be SS only by the looks of it ... but don't want to be dismissive of the machine itself it is worth using.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Any thoughts? I'd really appreciate your opinion! TIA

  2. #2
    Junior Member makitmama's Avatar
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    I have been going thru the photo library on the yahoo vintage Japanese SM group. This machine resembles a Japanese badged machine due to the feed dog drop. It has a motor mount and could have been electric before it was converted to treadle. It reminds me somewhat of an early Pfaff, although those aren't badged clones.
    I have seen SS machines like this set up with a treadle for leatherwork... They can't handle anything but garment leather and light upholstery though.
    Cil




    I'm a Queen.... at least my pantyhose say I am!


    (proud caretaker of a magenta 221, purple 222, assorted 66's, a 301, a pink Atlas and Monarch, and Granny's 201-2.

  3. #3
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...ngth-133700194

    Here is a good description of the Phoenix 250. It was made in Germany.
    Sweet Caroline

  4. #4
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makitmama View Post
    I have seen SS machines like this set up with a treadle for leatherwork... They can't handle anything but garment leather and light upholstery though.
    Thanks Makitmama - that's probably the most relevant point for my purposes, as I rarely do any heavy-duty sewing. However, when one DOES want to do some, it's nice to have the right machine for the job. I'll have to give that some careful consideration

  5. #5
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S View Post
    Here is a good description of the Phoenix 250. It was made in Germany.
    Thanks Caroline! That was a very good description. I think I came across that ad early in my search and then skipped over it for some reason - maybe because I was looking for pics of the table. Anyway... fabulous to know what the machine could be used for! I love the look of it and always like the idea of having a strong, simple machine. Most of the work I do is bridal and evening wear, but if a couch needs re-upholstering or I need to make curtains, then I always do it myself. I'll report back with some pics and info about the Phoenix after I've seen it.

  6. #6
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Well, what a morning! Went to look at the Phoenix in an industrial wasteland - I had no idea what I was going to find or what that quoted $50 might buy me in a place like that. It was all desolate blocks of lands, fenced at the perimeter... protecting what seemed to be either rubbish or decrepit buildings, for the most part.

    The place I went to was behind a 7ft high set of metal doors and the guy I met was quite unkempt and had half his teeth missing with a dog that had an eye missing (not trying to be rude here, but just want to describe the scene - they were quite a pair!) ...And there is was. Sitting in the wet grass; a small wooden cabinet with the machine inside; an empty tin under the seat, its contents strewn in the grass beneath the machine; the seller seemingly oblivious to the importance of keeping the machine dry/together (sigh). He was nice enough, but it was pretty depressing. His grandmother's machine and treadle cabinet, rotting in this place that smelled like wet grass and doggy do. The veneer is peeling off in ribbons down the front of the cabinet and rippling on the top surface. I just had to get it out of there!!!

    So for $30, I've got myself a VERY lost puppy. The owner didn't know anything about what his grandma used it for, and didn't have any memories of the machine, so that was a shame. I don't know if I can do anything with it, but at least it's out of the weather.

    Here is a link to the gallery if anyone's interested to take a look: http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums18008.html

    All light-hearted jeering is welcome/expected. Commiserations gratefully accepted

  7. #7
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    Caroline, I've never seen one of these before, but as soon as I saw the photo, I thought, "It looks German".

    Very interesting machine.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  8. #8
    Super Member BoJangles's Avatar
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    It is really sad the way these old machines were just thrown away. Grandmother had very good taste as she bought one of the best treadles she could get. It is sad that later generations don't understand the sacrifices their relatives made to be able to have a sewing machine as nice as the Phoenix.

    Congratulations on saving a very nice machine. The cabinet may be a mess, but at least the machine is still is pretty good shape.

    Nancy

  9. #9
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Beautiful machine, glad you saved it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoJangles View Post
    It is really sad the way these old machines were just thrown away. Grandmother had very good taste as she bought one of the best treadles she could get. It is sad that later generations don't understand the sacrifices their relatives made to be able to have a sewing machine as nice as the Phoenix.

    Congratulations on saving a very nice machine. The cabinet may be a mess, but at least the machine is still is pretty good shape.

    Nancy
    Quote Originally Posted by purplefiend View Post
    Beautiful machine, glad you saved it.
    Thank you both! I think it's an amazing machine and very beautiful. Really looking forward to having a go at restoring it

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