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Thread: Disassembling Hand Wheel (Singer 66 Red Eye)

  1. #1
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
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    Disassembling Hand Wheel (Singer 66 Red Eye)

    I am following Billy's wonderful instructions for disassembling and cleaning old sewing machines. See: Cleaning your Vintage Sewing Machine Part One....Disassembly

    [anyone know how Billy is doing? He hasn't been on here for a few weeks.]

    I am at the point where I am trying to remove the hand wheel. This baby clearly has NOT been used to wind bobbins in quite some time. The knob in the inner wheel won't turn whatsoever. I've removed the tiny screw holding it onto/into the hand wheel, and I can't get it to budge. I've tried wd40, a rubber jar lid gripping device; I've even thudded it gently with the hard rubber end of my screw driver. Nada, zip, rien, no-budgah.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks.

    -- Jillaine
    jillaine
    Bust Your Stash! (ongoing and open)

  2. #2
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    Jillaine,

    I hate when that happens. I invite one of my big guy friends over for a beer or food. And, oh while you are here, can you be so kind to loosen this for me????? Tilt the head, look up, blink blink...you know the move....

    I have heard others use some vice grips or channel locks but you need to pad the wheel with a rag or something so you don't mar it.

    Billy has had another outbreak so keep him in your prayers.
    Lisa

  3. #3
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
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    Nice to meet you, Lisa. I see you're a SoCal gal. I grew up in La Jolla; my folks are still in the area. This is my first attempt at returning an antique machine to its glory. I never would have even attempted it if it hadn't been for Billy and his great tutorials. Did you ever send him that W&W9? (I was perusing your posts, trying to find a larger image of your avatar.) That was a fun thread to read-- getting him to guess. Amazing. Sounds like you have a collection of your own. I have only two machines-- the 1910 Singer Red Eye that I found in a junk shop last summer (for which I also recently found a free treadle base-- I'm converting it to treadle) -- and my main machine, a 1977 Montgomery Ward Signature that was used maybe a half-dozen times since its original purchase and when it was given to me a year ago by a neighbor.
    jillaine
    Bust Your Stash! (ongoing and open)

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    A few months ago I had same stuck knob on my 66 redeye. I used a strap wrench and some powdered rosin to get mine loose. You can buy a small inexpensive strap wrench at auto parts or tools store. These will not damage the metal. Powdered rosin is a great gripping agent, you sprinkle it on the strap and it helps it grip the knob. You should be able to buy some at a music store. Its used on violin bows I think. I have a big jar of it I got from a gunsmith supply house years ago. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Jillaine, I have a 1909 Singer 66-1 with brown lotus decals. I took the motor off and put it in treadle, which is where it originally lived. It is so much happier. I ran into some stubborn screws, but the handwheel knob turned easily. Hope you get someone to help you get it loose. Be careful, though, with taking stuff off. If you get it back on wrong, it can cause all kinds of problems.

    When you look at the bottom of the machine, does it look reasonably clean, or is it really gunked up? That's including looking up the column with a flashlight. If it's reasonable clean, you can just do a cleaning by MUV's videos instead of taking it all apart. Only the extremely frozen/gunked up machines need the whole clean up by Billy's method. It's a lot of work that is not entirely necessary if the machine is relatively free of stiff gunk. Just saying.....

  6. #6
    Super Member jillaine's Avatar
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    Dear Janice "otherwise NOTW" (not of this world?),
    The innards, now that you mention it, seem okay; the worst of the damage is external. But it's probably too late now. I've got most of the external bits taken apart. I want to clean them; they're so crummy looking. And a fair amount of rust. I'm documenting the process overall in another topic.

    Handwheel is still stuck.

    ndnchf -- mmm.... where in virginia are you? I'm just across the potomac near Glen Echo park outside of DC.
    I'll go looking tomorrow for the supplies you mention.

    Thanks everyone. This is quite an adventure.
    jillaine
    Bust Your Stash! (ongoing and open)

  7. #7
    sap
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    years ago I used transmission fluid to loosen up a Free Westinghouse sm. Worked very well and when finished rust be gone. I'm still using that sewing machine.

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    I had the same problem. I couldn't get it off of a 15-91. I got frustrated and left it and went to work. When I came home my wonderful DH managed to get it off. I guess I forgot to turn a light off in the room and when he went in he saw what I was trying to do. (saw the manual out and such) He managed to get it off. I'm not sure how other than he is a lot stronger than I am. I asked him if I had missed a screw or something. He said no it was just really stuck on.

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    jillaine - I just remembered how I unstuck another frozen wheel and it was even easier. I cut a piece of leather about 1/2" wide and maybe 3" long to wrap around the stuck knob. I put powdered rosin on it first, then slipped a metal radiator hose clamp over it (available from auto parts stores) and tightened it real tight, The clamp has a hex/slotted screw head used to tighten the clamp. With the clamp as tight as I could get it, I used a screwdriver and a hammer to tap the clamp screw head sharply and break the knob loose. It worked great.

    I'm in Fredericksburg, Virginia

  10. #10
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jillaine View Post
    Nice to meet you, Lisa. I see you're a SoCal gal. I grew up in La Jolla; my folks are still in the area. This is my first attempt at returning an antique machine to its glory. I never would have even attempted it if it hadn't been for Billy and his great tutorials. Did you ever send him that W&W9? (I was perusing your posts, trying to find a larger image of your avatar.) That was a fun thread to read-- getting him to guess. Amazing. Sounds like you have a collection of your own. I have only two machines-- the 1910 Singer Red Eye that I found in a junk shop last summer (for which I also recently found a free treadle base-- I'm converting it to treadle) -- and my main machine, a 1977 Montgomery Ward Signature that was used maybe a half-dozen times since its original purchase and when it was given to me a year ago by a neighbor.
    I also grew up mostly in s.CA, LA county and La Palma. I do miss swimming at Huntington Beach. The ocean is 400 miles from me currently.
    Sharon W. in Texas

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