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Thread: Enough is enough, or you do what you gotta do.

  1. #1
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Enough is enough, or you do what you gotta do.

    Last August when my wife and I visited Miriam on our GW pick up trip to Indy she gave me a rusted up Wizard sewing machine.
    Apparently it was exposed to the elements and the needle bar and presser foot shaft were seized up solid.
    This is the only picture I have of it:

    It's the one in the rear.

    For two months now almost to the day I've been soaking that thing with oil trying to get it to free up. I removed all the external chrome bits, needle plate, slide plate too and cleaned them.
    But the rusted parts just would not cooperate at all. So, at the end of my patience I pulled out the propane torch and gave it some serious HEAT!
    Heat the seized parts, oil them, tap them, wiggle them. Repeat until success is achieved or it melts.

    Well the seized up parts gave in and they finally freed up. It's free all the way around now so when I get time I'll start the cleaning and diagnosing to see if it is fixable. I'm pretty sure it will be.

    The Wizard brand is or was a Western Auto ( remember them? ) brand. It was made by Brother as indicated by the J- A1 and J- C1 stampings on the machine. It's got a built in metal cam stack and probably about 40 or so patterns on the dial.

    So I'm thinking it just might be worth fixing it up. Maybe. When I get around to it.

    Thanks Miriam .... now I got another project.

    Joe

  2. #2
    Junior Member KenZ's Avatar
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    Joe
    You prooved that one should not give up to soon.
    Ken

  3. #3
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
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    Way to go, Joe!
    Stephanie in Mena

  4. #4
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Joe you have nothing but time. It just wasn't going to happen in this zoo. Shoot a pic when you get it working. I hated to see that machine in such bad condition - I know it should be a really nice machine if it was pristine but it is good hands - I'm glad. I was very disappointed when I looked that machine over - it was VERY rusted. Chrome pitted pretty much everywhere. I've been trying to salvage a few that needed a lot less work lately. A needle clamp here and a bobbin winder there, here a motor belt, over here a tension spring, there a bobbin case, everywhere missing motors or wires... Seems like they all have issues or they don't land at my place. Then I need to do about 25 sewing tests to be sure they work. I need to clean some Singer 401 motors this week - I can't stand the sounds I'm hearing.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  5. #5
    Senior Member pinecone's Avatar
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    I cut my teeth on a Wizard. (I can still head the radio ads now...go to your Western Auto Store.....) Wish I could say I loved it but the bobbin tension was always wandering, it is a wonder that I kept at sewing. Good luck.

    piney

  6. #6
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    PROPANE TORCH.....................! ! !


    golly-gee-whilikers.......never thought I would see the day

  7. #7
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I cut my teeth on a Wizard. (I can still head the radio ads now...go to your Western Auto Store.....) Wish I could say I loved it but the bobbin tension was always wandering, it is a wonder that I kept at sewing. Good luck.

    piney
    LOL as good as a FW is I had my frustrations learning on one.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  8. #8
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Way to go Joe. Propane torch and all. Sometimes one has to do what one has to do. I have one machine that I finally got out a monkey wrench to use on it as I could not get the hand wheel to turn (it was frozen up inside). I figured WTH, what could I lose? That sewing machine still has issues but her hand wheel now turns.
    Sweet Caroline

  9. #9
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline S View Post
    Way to go Joe. Propane torch and all. Sometimes one has to do what one has to do. I have one machine that I finally got out a monkey wrench to use on it as I could not get the hand wheel to turn (it was frozen up inside). I figured WTH, what could I lose? That sewing machine still has issues but her hand wheel now turns.
    Nah - you got in a hurry. DH did that and messed up the timing on one - patience and a good solvent should free it up unless it is rust... I don't do rust.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #10
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    All it takes to free up a rusty all metal machine is oil or solvent and sometimes HEAT. I have found that if oil can't seep into the seized up joint it can't free it up either. That's where the heat comes in. The heat causes the metals to expand and then the oil or solvent can get between the pieces and work. That's what I did yesterday with the torch. I would not have done that on a machine with plastic parts, but this one doesn't have any and I didn't concentrate the heat on any one part. I didn't even damage the paint.

    Once it's cleaned I'll have to retime the hook and needle bar, but I think I can do that.

    Joe

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