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Thread: How to package a F.W. machine for shipping?

  1. #21
    Super Member kydeb's Avatar
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    I bought a FW from New York - I'm in Kentucky. The gentleman I bought it from was the BEST packer ever!!! He wrapped the FW in bubble wrap inside of the FW case. It was VERY snug - couldn't move a fraction of an inch. He then wrapped the FW case in multiple layers of bubble wrap and put it in another box with additional packing material. It couldn't have moved a fraction of an inch! I have never seen packing like it!! Safely delivered just like he drove it to me himself. I was thrilled after hearing all of the horror stories! It's all a matter of taking your time and doing it right! Good luck!!
    Debbie in Kentucky
    kydeb.wordpress.com

  2. #22
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabbagepatchkid View Post
    I've had two different FW shipped to me through eBay. One of them came with a broken bobbin winder and the other one (my white FW ) arrived with the spool pin snapped off!! On a FW, the spool pin is permanently attached to the little piece of metal that hold it so I had to find a replacement for it but could only find one for a black FW.

    Both the bobbin winder and the spool pin doo-hicky are removable to prevent damage from shipping but most sellers wouldn't think to take them off.

    ETA: Here is some good info on packing a FW.... http://www.sew2go.com/fwpacking.htm
    That's how I pack a Featherweight too, I learned how from that website, have shipped 8 machines and never had one damaged in shipping. My customers complain that it takes forever to get into the machine, it took me about 2 hours to pack it. Remember any thing that moves inside the box can cause major damage. Everything has to fit tightly. I put an empty thread spool; either Gutterman or Madiera, one of the long skinny ones.
    I've also packed a very heavy Pfaff 260 using this method and it arrived in CT undamaged.

    Sharon W.
    Last edited by purplefiend; 01-30-2013 at 02:01 PM. Reason: added text

  3. #23
    Junior Member
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    Sorry. Bubble wrap cannot withstand the G forces generated in shipping. I have had 2 machines nearly destroyed in shipping to me. The best one of three was in styrofoam. A sewing machine man stated to place plastic sheeting around the machine and pour plastic foam liquid around them to fill the shipping box. That would leave no room to move. The bentwood cases fare the worst. The spool pins poke through them and the bottoms are beaten to pieces in shipping. I have had to replace all the dowels and repair other damages with epoxy. They can be repaired, but it is expensive, time consuming and intrusive. The best one was sent in a styrofoam cooler with rounded corners, very thick. They wedged styrofoam pieces in the harp of the machine and between the foot controller and cord. They then taped all this with plastic tape and placed itin the outer styrofoam with wedges of the same material. It arrived without any damage. I saved this packing in case I neeeded to mail a machine somewhere. Bubble wrap is false security. If you could find a thicker and beefier version, it may work, but just know the machines are heavy iron and not be underestimated in their destructive power when loose in a box.

  4. #24
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaMiller View Post
    Sorry. Bubble wrap cannot withstand the G forces generated in shipping. I have had 2 machines nearly destroyed in shipping to me. The best one of three was in styrofoam. A sewing machine man stated to place plastic sheeting around the machine and pour plastic foam liquid around them to fill the shipping box. That would leave no room to move. The bentwood cases fare the worst. The spool pins poke through them and the bottoms are beaten to pieces in shipping. I have had to replace all the dowels and repair other damages with epoxy. They can be repaired, but it is expensive, time consuming and intrusive. The best one was sent in a styrofoam cooler with rounded corners, very thick. They wedged styrofoam pieces in the harp of the machine and between the foot controller and cord. They then taped all this with plastic tape and placed itin the outer styrofoam with wedges of the same material. It arrived without any damage. I saved this packing in case I neeeded to mail a machine somewhere. Bubble wrap is false security. If you could find a thicker and beefier version, it may work, but just know the machines are heavy iron and not be underestimated in their destructive power when loose in a box.
    I love the idea of a strofoam cooler!!! Carol is having a hard time finding a box, to pack the machine into. Thanks!!
    Marie

    You don't stop laughing because you grow old. You grow old because you stop laughing.
    A smile is something you can't give away; it always comes back to you.

  5. #25
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaMiller View Post
    Sorry. Bubble wrap cannot withstand the G forces generated in shipping. ...... it may work, but just know the machines are heavy iron and not be underestimated in their destructive power when loose in a box.
    I think the key difference here is "loose in a box" Bubble wrap works VERY well if the piece is packed well enough that it cannot move. The issue that I have found is when people treat bubble wrap like magic wrap.... "I wrapped bubble wrap around it twice.." is not going to cut it.

    The issue that I have has with hard foam/styro is it was packed so tight that the shocks were transmitted directly to the unit inside.

    I have had damaged items that were packed in bubble wrap, foam, expanding foam, and even a custom made wooden shipping crate.

    Failure to isolate the object from movement and insulating it from transferred shock is the key to a getting a damaged machine.

    Dual boxing and dense packing of soft insulators is the best approach that I have found.

    Another trick that I ask my shippers to use is to turn the box upside down and shake it before they ship it. If it moves, redo it.

    FWIW

  6. #26
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    The issue that I have has with hard foam/styro is it was packed so tight that the shocks were transmitted directly to the unit inside.
    DH works for one of the big shippers. He brought up a good point about the styro foam - Once it takes an impact once - from the machine or externally, that portion of the foam is "Crushed" and stays that way. Its impact resistance is compromised in that spot for the rest of the trip. If nothing hits it, it's fine, but if it does, it's a one-use item. Hopefully the conditions that let it happen once were removed.

    It can't be the only protection either. I found a good combination of everything - soft foam packed tightly between machine and box, bubble wrap around the pedal until it was lodged tightly in the harp and no chance to move, double box, and styro foam to take up the big spaces. Then I cut the soft foam and bubble wrap to fit the smaller spaces and made sure the box had a little tension from the packing materials on top and bottom before I did the box up.

    Edit: And don't forget to bag and bubble wrap the attachments and extra plates. They will end up -everywhere- and can do almost as much destruction (especially throat plates) as the pedal.
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
    Singer 411G, 301A, 2x 221 (featherweight), 222k - the holy grail, 15-90 Centennial, 27, VS2, 28 hc, 128 knee bar, 201-2, 31-15, Pfaff 130-6. Non-Vintage - Pfaff 6122, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81595 serger, Kenmore (Janome) 385.81155, 2013 APQS Lucey

  7. #27
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    The machine should be on my front porch on Tuesday.
    I will let you know how it fares. . . . . . . . .
    Please keep your fingers crossed!!
    Marie

    You don't stop laughing because you grow old. You grow old because you stop laughing.
    A smile is something you can't give away; it always comes back to you.

  8. #28
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabbagepatchkid View Post
    Does anyone else remember when a forum member bought a FW from ebay and the seller slapped the address label right on the FW's carrying case and sent it on it's way :0
    My son bought a fw from ebay and this is exactly how they shipped it....unbelievable!
    Lynn

  9. #29
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    Ladies, with all of your help and advise, my sister was able to pack up my FW. FED EX delivered it last night, without a scratch or bump on it!! Now, I must admit she did an AWESOME job of packing it up!! It took my hubby a half an hour to take off all of the packing. It was a combination of bubble wrap, styrafoam, peanuts, shrink wrap, an old beach towel, some flannel and everything in seperate bags.
    The little feather weight just purrs. I have every attachment, screw drivers, oil can, lube gel, manual, needles, bobbins that originally came with the machine. I could not believe how good it looked. I don't think they used it very much. But, they did take good care of it. It was stored inside the house. The former owners wanted someone to buy buy it that would use and love it, not re-sell it for a profit. I fit the bill!!!
    Thank you once again for helping me plan out her trip from Oregon to Southern California!!
    Marie

    You don't stop laughing because you grow old. You grow old because you stop laughing.
    A smile is something you can't give away; it always comes back to you.

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