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Thread: Morse Ambassador

  1. #1
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    Morse Ambassador

    My friend gave me this beautiful girl. She has some issues, but I love her! I don't know much about vintage machines. Friend said she thinks there is something wrong with the tension, but I think it could be more than that. The needle does go up and down when I press the foot, so that is a good thing! The light doesn't work (could just be burned out) but the motor cord is worn and needs replacing. And she needs a good cleaning. I think the model number is J-C4 or JA19 but can't find anything online using those search terms. If anyone knows anything about this machine that would be great. I would like to take it for repairs but have no idea what a reasonable price would be. How much could I expect to spend fixing the wiring? What if she needs a complete overhaul? Is it worth it? More pictures and information here:http://chopstickknits.blogspot.com/2...g-machine.html Thanks!

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  2. #2
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    I can't tell you a whole lot other than I'd get the wiring done, and the "E" for embroidery will drop the feed dogs so you can free motion!

    Repairs are expensive if you have them done by a pro, but I think this girl would be worth it!! If it was me, I'd do everything I know how to do before taking it in, WITHOUT running the power on it! Clean, etc., so that your "mechanic" doesn't have to...
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  3. #3
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    Isn't she gorgeous!! I'm sure someone on here will be able to help. I just had to say what a pretty girl.

  4. #4
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    You can clean it yourself, but I don't so electrics. My Universal's wiring was rotted. I got the cover off the motor, but when I saw the soldering and such that would need to be done, I took it to my large appliance repairman. He took care of the motor and wiring for his $35 bench fee.

    I love the two tone pink. If I found one like that, she'd follow me home.

  5. #5
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    If the sewing machine was free, it would be well worth it to have it fixed. The J numbers are not the model numbers. Is there a plate on the right side of the pillar with a model number? If she were mine, and she would be because I don't have a pink one, I would try to find a manual online. It is possible that the dials are not set correctly for her to sew properly. Follow Charlee's advice, oil her and clean her. Then find a good OSMG to take her to for repairs. BUT, if you decide that you don't want to invest the $$ in her, I WILL GIVE HER A GOOD HOME.
    Sweet Caroline

  6. #6
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    The Yahoo group of Japan made machines has a link to manuals available for purchase.

  7. #7
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stitchninja View Post
    My friend gave me this beautiful girl. She has some issues, but I love her! I don't know much about vintage machines. Friend said she thinks there is something wrong with the tension, but I think it could be more than that. The needle does go up and down when I press the foot, so that is a good thing! The light doesn't work (could just be burned out) but the motor cord is worn and needs replacing. And she needs a good cleaning. I think the model number is J-C4 or JA19 but can't find anything online using those search terms. If anyone knows anything about this machine that would be great. I would like to take it for repairs but have no idea what a reasonable price would be. How much could I expect to spend fixing the wiring? What if she needs a complete overhaul? Is it worth it? More pictures and information here:http://chopstickknits.blogspot.com/2...g-machine.html Thanks!

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    According to a chart I found over at Yahoo's Japanese machine group, the J-A19 number is Toyota and they made Morse machines. Yes, Toyota Motor Corporation, the same ones that make cars. From what I have read they are of excellent quality.

    Now the easy stuff:

    A: Replace the light, that's no big deal. That will also tell you if the internal wiring is good or not. You already know the circuits from the wall socket through the cord block to the foot controller then to the motor work.

    B: Inspect the machine.

    The motor is an external motor held on to the machine by a bracket so you can easily inspect it. Is the wiring bad or not? Look close for cut, cracked, abraded, soft, gooey, or crumbling insulation and poorly done splices. If you see that, it will need rewired. If you don't see these things check the plug. It should be solidly attached to the cord with no cracks or broken parts. Plugs are easy to replace.

    Check the cord block wiring for the same deterioration as the motor. If you see it the cord block should be replaced. Same thing for plugs.

    To check the foot controller connections you'll have to disassemble (usually just pull the back off) the controller and visually check the connections.

    Check the needle park position.
    That machine should have a "L-M-R" control somewhere on the front of the machine. It could be a horizontal or a rotary control. It will be interconnected with the stitch width control.
    Find it and put it on "M" then set the stitch width control to straight stitch and see where the needle parks. It should be centered in the needle slot. If so good. If not it will have to be adjusted.

    (NOTE Some machines park the needle to the left when on straight stitch. Those machine will not have a "L-M-R" control.

    Now to less easy part.
    I have two of that type of machines. They use internal cam stacks with very complex linkage and controls.
    One control can have several functions depending on what the other controls are set at.

    Pull the top off of the machine and look at it. There are many many moving parts that can be gummed up with old oil or sometimes grease. I've cleaned out what looked like old chassis grease from several machines. Yuck.

    An owners manual will tell you specific places to oil and or grease. My method is this. Linkage, shafts, sliders, rotating things, non Singer motors, all get oil. Metal gears, forks on main shaft cams-(not stitch cams), and certain plastic gears get grease. Some times the stitch and pattern cam stacks will need grease, sometimes not. I do the same thing underneath the bottom of the machine.

    If you over oil the machine as you are getting it freed up, don't worry about it. Due to the design of the machine most excess oil will drip down and end up under the machine. You can use cotton swabs or a rag on to wipe much of it up.

    Basically just use your eyes to examine then begin to run the controls. I have two machines similar to yours, so with a clearer pic I can help with the controls. It's better if you find an owners manual, but you can figure them out sans manual if you have to.

    Edited to add: I've become very partial to Tri-Flow oil and grease. The oil is worth it for the good job lubing it does and the grease is great as well. Sew-Classic has it, and your local bicycle shop might too. Mine does.



    Joe
    Last edited by J Miller; 06-30-2012 at 08:06 AM.

  8. #8
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Yesterday, I just just about finished a Dressmaker, very much like that. Mine was bought at an auction for $1 for the table. I didn't know a machine was in there until we tried to move it. The machine would not turn. This machine was filthy and frozen up. The knobs were frozen up. Nothing moved. NOTHING. NOTHING. NOTHING. I thought it might be fun so I cleaned it and oiled it. I had real problems with the knobs. I took it with me to Ray's class. We got it going but it took a LOT of work. I was able to fix all but the wiring - so far anyway... It will also go on a treadle. OH and all that work was worth it. I've been wanting one that would HC or treadle.
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    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #9
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    They are not identical. You have to turn one knob to park another setting. Kind of complicated to work but not too bad once you play with it and figure it out. The LRC setting changes the decorative stitches.
    Last edited by miriam; 07-01-2012 at 05:26 AM.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #10
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    To get mine unfrozen, I oiled like Joe said and let it set. Then I went back and tried to move things. This one still did not move. The stitch selector and the stitch length and the reverse stuck the hardest and were the worst job to fix. I also had problem when the knob broke loose - it only had a set screw holding it and since the shaft was gooey the knob turned but not the shaft. We had to use a Dremmel to get it secure. Triflow and time. Drop on the Triflow thoroughly like Joe said and wait. Then check it in a week or two. The reverse has internal stuff that needs to ungoo. Don't try to force the knobs to turn. Use the Triflow oil and WAIT. Sit on your hands. BUT if you do that you will need to be very thorough. It is the dried gummy oil you can't see that is giving you the grief.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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