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Thread: My Mother's Machine

  1. #1
    Senior Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    My Mother's Machine

    This is a picture of my mother's sewing machine that she got when she married in 1943. I sent it to get serviced and was told that it needs a new motor. They couldn't find a motor that would fit.

    It's not made by Singer. I don't know why that Singer instruction book is with the machine. The service tech said that it is a Japanese knockoff. It's very heavy.

    I'd hate to throw it away. Does anyone know where I could find someone that may have a use for it?
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  2. #2
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Jennr8r,

    First and foremost ditch that so called repair facility, they don't know diddly squat. Motors are very easy to come by for that machine.

    It is what is commonly called an HA-1 / 15 Clone. A close but not exact copy of the Singer 15-90 machines.
    By the looks it, it is a 3/4 sized machine.

    If you want to part with it, PM me and I'll give it a new home. We can discuss details off forum.
    If you'd rather not do that the existing motor can most likely be saved if you want to. If not then Sew-Classic has replacement motors for a reasonable cost.

    With some cleaning and oiling and perhaps some motor work that little machine will purr for you.

    Joe

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I can't believe they couldn't find a motor that "fit". I hope you didn't pay them for that information. It looks to be a 3/4 size machine to me, but there are plenty of black clones and 3/4 Singer parts machines. It sort of sounds like they didn't want to go to the effort to save this machine and hunt down a motor for you. Maybe someone here has a 3/4 size donor machine that could help you.

  4. #4
    Super Member jlhmnj's Avatar
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    Hi Jennr9r,

    A shame the shop wasn't more helpful but don't give up the repairs should not be difficult or expensive. This machine is a little later than 1943 as we were not buying Japanese "Clone" sewing machines during WW2. Singer supplied this technology after the War. SM Motors for your machine are a dime a dozen (almost). Good Luck.

    Jon

  5. #5
    Senior Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    Well, I'm really surprised... It has sentimental value, and my brother who is on a fixed income wanted it. I thought I would have it serviced before I gave it to him.

    Does anyone have any idea how to find a reputable repair shop in my area? It is so heavy that I'm afraid the shipping would probably cost more than it's worth.

  6. #6
    Super Member LoisM's Avatar
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    Joe...is this machine a candidate for a hand-crank??

  7. #7
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    Ditto what J Miller said. Like so many other repairmen. They don't know their "?' from a hole in the ground about machine repair. J Miller is probably much more refined than I am.

  8. #8
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    It looks like it is in great shape!
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place...the End Times.

    Heaven and Earth are full of His Glory!

  9. #9
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JENNR8R
    Well, I'm really surprised... It has sentimental value, and my brother who is on a fixed income wanted it. I thought I would have it serviced before I gave it to him.

    Does anyone have any idea how to find a reputable repair shop in my area? It is so heavy that I'm afraid the shipping would probably cost more than it's worth.
    Shipping would run "around" $35.00. I've paid anywhere from $18.00 to 40.00 for shipping on machines I've won on Shopgoodwill.com. And this one might be heavier than the current plastic junque, but it's a lot lighter than the full sized machines are.
    Now to find a good repair shop: I'd call the shops in your area and tell them you have a simple 1950s vintage Japanese straight stitch sewing machine that needs serviced and possibly some motor repair. Ask them if they actually service machines like that or not. Then be prepared for the old "I gotta see it to be sure". When you get that, tell them "Thanks but no Thanks" and hang up. "IF" they are a repair shop they will know weather or not they repair these machines.

    Servicing machines of that type is easy. If you can follow the instructions on a pattern and make the item, you can service the machine. Changing out the motor if needed is also easy. Don't over think it.

    I meant what I said in my first response.



    Quote Originally Posted by LoisM View Post
    Joe...is this machine a candidate for a hand-crank??
    More than likely, but I'd just fix the motor, and be thrilled with it.

  10. #10
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Agree 100% with Joe on all counts.

    I started collecting vintage machines but limited myself to treadles because I didn't think I could do electric work. I've finished two now, and working on my third.

    There are lots of tutorials and video's out there to help you along.

    If you or someone in your family can handle a screw driver and follow instructions ... the machine can be repaired. It's not rocket science.

    If you're not up to the task, there is sure to be someone local that is experienced with vintage machines.

    I found this guy just by searching "vintage sewing machine repair Herndon VA". I cannot give a personal testimonial, but reading the website ... looks like he knows his way around a vintage machine and CARES.
    https://sewingmachinesteve.sharepoin...s/default.aspx
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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