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Thread: Need help with a singer.

  1. #11
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    I got parts...just wish I knew what they all were!

  2. #12
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Yeah, it pays to label them doesn't it?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  3. #13
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Contrary to popular belief, these machines are not rare. Not even close. There's nothing wrong with parting out one machine to rebuild another.

    That being said, Joe...if you're NOT a collector, what are you doing with so many machines?? You remind me of my sister who says, "I'm NOT a quilter, I just make baby blankets!" ~wink and a grin~
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  4. #14
    Senior Member sewred's Avatar
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    If you can't find everything you can also try here: www.cutsewservice.com they have all types of parts we've done quite a bit of business with them! Congrats on the new member of the family whatcha gonna name her?
    Sew, sew, it's the threads that keep love together :>} I love sunbonnet sue,old-fashioned things like 1950's or older housewife things, and like hankies,tea towels and aprons . Thanks to some lovely members on here I now have lots of aprons in my collection !!

  5. #15
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    I am in the "fix her" corner also. To me it is the challenge of taking an old sewing machine and restoring/refurbishing her to usefulness. Yep, there is money involved. I don't care. It makes me happy to accomplish something and learn something new by doing.
    Sweet Caroline

  6. #16
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Jacquie,
    I appreciate the idea, but I'm hip deep in project machines and cabinets for a while.
    As for parts post a pic of them, they should be identifiable.

    Charlee,
    Oh geeze, what is the difference between a collector and an accumulator?

    Well, a collector obsesses over the perfect example. Always searching for the item in 100% condition. Willing to sacrifice a good item to make a better one perfect. I've seen this with gun collectors a lot. Always parting out perfectly useable guns after taking one piece off of them to put on their favorite collection gun. They make me sick.

    An accumulator picks up what speaks to them. I like Singer 66s so it seems they speak to me. But I'm not obsessed about the perfect example. I won't sacrifice one machine to make another one better. I have one that has so much needle rash on the arm it's down to the bare metal. But oh it sews sooooooooo nice. Part it out to fix another one? No chance in hades.

    So no, I'm not a "collector", I'm an "accumulator". Or a hoarder if you want.
    I think Caroline's comment pretty much fits me to a T as well.

    Joe

  7. #17
    Junior Member MadCow333's Avatar
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    ^ Hoarders, lol. We need to all make money off a Hoarders: Sewing Machind Edition episode, haha. Reality shows are staged, so we could all toss in 5-10 machines and some empty cabinets stacked to the ceiling, and make it look really extreme. ;-D


    I have a Singer 66-16 that I just got around to taking a look at. (I think I have owned it since summer of 2006. Seriously.) I need some assistance:

    1. The bobbin winder "droops.'" This is the more modern 66 that has the stitch length lever and the backtack. It has the modern bobbin winder mechanism. That bobbin winder tire hangs so loosely that it rides on the handwheel, like all the time. Is that an adjustment or will I need to buy a spring?

    2. What belt length for it? It's the original big Bakelite Singer motor, and the Alphasew 1512 belt is too short.

    3. The presser foot is missing. It's standard low shank, side clamp. Does anyone have a spare to sell?

    4. Handcrank conversion: I am considering it. I have a handcrank. I'd need a spoked wheel. If I buy a Chinese aftermarket spoked wheel, will I need to worry about either the bobbin winder not matching up, or the wrong bushing/collar might be on the shaft (I read someplace that if something-or-other, take the bushing off the parts machine along w/ the spoked wheel.) If I don't turn this one into a hc, I will have to buy a new cord for it plus rewire the motor b/c all the insulation is flaking off. I am afeared of electrical motors.

    It's a 1945 model, with scrolled endplate and backplate. Very nice smooth action. Has a shellac finish, too, I think. I have, in the past, for Singer 127 treadle heads, just tossed them in the sink, scrubbed them clean, dried them out, and then used a brush to paint fresh shellac on them. It seemed to work okay, too.
    Last edited by MadCow333; 05-15-2013 at 12:56 PM.

  8. #18
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    YIKES! Have you been looking in the windows? I DO have cabinets stacked to the ceiling and machines wall to wall EVERYWHERE... it is getting worse daily... HMMM I wonder how much money the hoarders would pay - I have a mother lode in my shop... I wouldn't need contributions but why not. Of course you might not get your 10 or so machines back if the machines get lost or decide they like it back there... or ew - they might multiply....
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #19
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I understand that. What I don't understand is why people consider spending a few dollars to fix an other wise good machine to be such a bad thing. Money isn't everything.

    Destroying one machine to fix another one that could be fixed simply by dropping some cash and buying some replacement parts is in my way of thinking wrong. There are times that a machine is just simply too far gone, use what you can, but in the last few months I've seen perfectly good machines destroyed simply because their decals weren't in good shape or they needed a hard to find part. This isn't a recent thing for me, I feel the same about cars, trucks, guns, fountain pens, and just about anything.
    This mentality comes from collectors. Take the best parts from useable (insert item here _______________ ) put them on one that's shinier and charge more money for it. I find it sickening.

    I won't rant any more about it here, I mean nothing personal by my comments, but I am not a collector and that's the way I feel.

    Joe

    I agree but don't have the know-how to restore or fix them but have tried to keep the old ones I have and tried to buy parts they need and they are just the basic things for them. I like sitting at my old machines and imagine whose lives they clothed and/or made money for the things they made on them... just day dreaming, I guess.

  10. #20
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    Assuming you're willing to go the distance (and spend the $$$) to restore this machine, you'll need to get Evaporust to soak the rusted parts in.

    That being said, I'm one of those Craigslist junkies that hunts down every machine in my area worth repairing--and based on this photo, I'd pass on this machine. I'm not saying that to be discouraging or to dissuade you, just want to share what I've learned the hard way in the hopes of saving you some trouble and $$$, or preparing you for what's to come if you decide to take the plunge:

    We can see in the photo that the bobbin area is pretty badly rusted. You'll need to take all of that apart in order to get the rust off, and even then, there's no guarantee it won't be pitted. If it is, you'll need to purchase those parts.

    Ditto for the bobbin winding mechanism, and with that amount of rust--or "oxidation," as some like to politely call it--I'd wager the spring is bad as well and will need to be replaced along with the rest of it, unless the Evaporust does the trick. (The bear is, you won't know until you try whether it will work or not.)

    The needlebar area and the one tension plate left on the machine also shows rust, as does the thumbscrew holding the faceplate on and the thread guide that's north of the tension assembly. (That thread guide in particular is tricky to replace, and so tricky to remove that I don't think I've ever seen anyone selling one as a spare part.) Rust isn't usually isolated, so I'm willing to bet that if you look at the machine's undersides, and behind the faceplate, you're going to find more rust. If you do, removing that from those internal parts requires major surgery, i.e. removing the needlebar, removing the main shaft, re-timing the machine, et cetera. This is not a problem if you're mechanically adept, or patient enough to learn, provided you've got the right set of tools (a comprehensive set of hollow-ground screwdriver bits in a variety of sizes will serve you well).

    All of this doesn't mean this machine is unfixable--it just means you ought to know what you're getting into. If your priority is to fix this particular machine and learn something, I'd say dive in, as long as you've got the time and money. Rescuing a machine can bring a lot of satisfaction. But if your priority is to get to sewing in a timely manner, I think you'd be better off looking for another machine.
    - Rain

    Vintage Singer Sewing Machine Blog
    http://vssmb.blogspot.com/

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