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Thread: Need some help with 401 restoring

  1. #11
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Oh, oh, Joe found the emoticons. I see some colorful posts coming up.

    Very nice machines. I like the treadle cabinet better than mine, but don't tell my son. The 401 cabinet has lots of storage.

    You'll have to ask Miriam and Joe where to put any solvent on the 401. The 404 is a much simpler machine, so I'm inexperienced there. Me? I just apply it anywhere there might be a stuck part. Then wipe it out and oil the area afterwards.

  2. #12
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    OooooooKay, here is a picture worth 8,000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 words

    Name:  Under the top.JPG
Views: 140
Size:  134.4 KB
    In the pic above all the "O"s are oil points. The "G"s are grease points. I use Tri-Flow from Sew-Classic cos it's better.

    The big square topped thing on the center of the cam stack is the retaining screw. You stick a screwdriver in the slot and turn it counterclockwise to loosen it. Then the cam stack should come up.

    Literally everything there moves and needs oil. The two small vertical shafts on the left side of the cam stack is the selector shafts. Those gum up badly and then will not move. On this machine I used Hoppe's #9 Gun cleaning solvent. On my Singer 500 that's identical internally I used q-tips and denatured alcohol. Either or both will work.

    After it's clean oil it with Tri-Flow and then spend some time running the controls through all their travels.

    Joe

  3. #13
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    OooooooKay, here is a picture worth 8,000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 words

    Name:  Under the top.JPG
Views: 140
Size:  134.4 KB
    In the pic above all the "O"s are oil points. The "G"s are grease points. I use Tri-Flow from Sew-Classic cos it's better.

    The big square topped thing on the center of the cam stack is the retaining screw. You stick a screwdriver in the slot and turn it counterclockwise to loosen it. Then the cam stack should come up.

    Literally everything there moves and needs oil. The two small vertical shafts on the left side of the cam stack is the selector shafts. Those gum up badly and then will not move. On this machine I used Hoppe's #9 Gun cleaning solvent. On my Singer 500 that's identical internally I used q-tips and denatured alcohol. Either or both will work.

    After it's clean oil it with Tri-Flow and then spend some time running the controls through all their travels.

    Joe
    I high lighted some of what Joe wrote.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  4. #14
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    Yes, I've oiled all those points plus some, greased the appropriate gears, except for under the cam stack. Can't get the retaining screw to move yet. Will get the solvent tomorrow and see if that helps. I can get the left selector to go to H, and the right one to move throughout the choices, - if the red width selector is to the right. If it is in the center, the right selector won't move at all. And the red width selector won't move to the left at all. Will keep oiling!!

    Thanks for both of you for the support. I really appreciate the help.

    Re the treadle, I have to admit that the handles on the drawers are not original - many years ago before I knew better, there was one broken and I replaced them all from a restoration hardware store. These were the only ones that fit the drawers so they got chosen. Other than that, it's a very old family heirloom. I remember my stepmother making shirts for my dad out of heavy canvas sacking, when we lived on our ranch without electricity, phone, and 20 miles to the nearest paved road, two room school, PO, The oil lamp in the photo is also from that home. We did our homework by kerosene light - great memories.

  5. #15
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Cowbelle, Those selectors IMHO will need solvent. Get some stick on panty liners or some cosmetic pads and pack the edges and bottom - get a depend and cover the base of the machine - you don't want solvent on your paint. Then paint some solvent on the selectors - you don't have to remove the cam stack - it is a little easier to clean the stacks though - The Tri-flow might penetrate that screw if you turn the machine upside down - heat may help. I've taken the whole selector mess apart before to clean it - kind of hard to get it back together unless you have a really good memory and like to do puzzles. Some solvents are made to evaporate quicker than others. When I use a solvent, I drink a LOT of water and I try to take a detox bath afterwards - I have a lot of chemical sensitivities so I try to do it out doors on a windy day, too. There are some dried up oils that do not come off very easily. You may need something that will more or less vaporize that gunk.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #16
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    Thank you very much for the details, Miriam. I'm sure you get tired of answering the same questions, but I had not found this in the archives. I'll get the solvent today. And the depends! All good advice and I appreciate the help.

  7. #17
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Almost under the cam stack - below the rectangle thingy is a plunger or piston type part - moves horizontal - it has it's other end on the needle bar. If you push on the needle bar you can see it go in and out there - follow the part to just before it goes under the camstack - see it go in and out? That needs to be cleaned with solvent, too - drape off the painted areas of the machine and use caution.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  8. #18
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I have a 401 that was really gunked up - I'm not sure where I bought it or what I paid but I'm thinking I over paid if I paid for it at all... They should have paid me to haul it away... The motor on this one would spin freely with the clutch dis-engaged. Phil tested the motor and the wiring. It is fine. The motor would go then keep getting slower when the clutch was engaged. I cleaned and cleaned but figured it either had a bent something which I couldn't see or there was still some gummy in there. I finally took off the cord holder and dug down in there after that gear - it is the same machine the kidos helped with - see my QB pic on the left - I was distracted at any rate. Anyway I pulled the cord widget off and dug out oil, fluff, hair or what ever was in there. It started moving better right away - I figured if I did a half job I better go over the whole machine again. I removed the cam stack and cleaned some more. Some how I managed to pop off the spring that goes on the zz and had fits getting it to stay on - finally got out the pliers and bent the thing a good one. Then I wasted a bunch of time trying to find the Tri-flow grease... in plain sight... I found a very screwed up tension in the bobbin area - took me awhile to get it right. The upper tension didn't want to adjust so I swapped it out for another one since this machine is sold and the buyer is coming Wednesday. I must have spent a good couple hours on the tension problems before I figured out the hook had a burr. DUH It seems to be ok now. I need to print out a manual and then do a swatch now that I think it will do a swatch.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #19
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Ok somebody draw a circle around that thing that goes in and out when it zig zags so we all know what to clean...
    I hope the picture loads here ok.
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    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  10. #20
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Oh and that is what she looks like with the cam stack removed
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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