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Thread: One more question for the vintage machine quilters

  1. #11
    Junior Member masufa's Avatar
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    I like to starch the back very well and pin pin pin lots of pins. Then I divide the quilt into 4 sections starting straight down the middle and then accros the middle,In the beginning I actually used painted tape to divide the sections. I start to quilt in the top right section and work down then turn the quilt and quilt the lower left up to the top left this way you only have half of the quilt under the machine at any time and you aren't tusseling it around as much.

  2. #12
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    I machine quilt King sized quilts on my 201 and had no trouble getting to the middle with the harp space. It actually had more room than my Janome 6500 because the available space to shove your quilt through is more rectangular and higher. I don't roll it but scrunch it around as needed. I used a walking foot and STD and my 201 just powered through all the layers. I also tried some FMQ and that worked fine too although I had to fiddle a little with the tension. I divide mine up like masufa above described and it worked well for me.
    Shelbie from the High County in Southern Ontario

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Joe,
    Be sure to set the seam allowance on each machine, individually. The biggest problem we have with multiple- machine charity quilts, is getting the corners to match since every machine does a different 1/4" allowance unless it is measured and adjusted. As you know, some 1/4" feet aren't 1/4" either. Calibrating the seam allowance will help make piecing more accurate and not so frustrating. You will truly learn about each machine by using them in a like task. Good luck on your new experience.
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  4. #14
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Everyone else has given you great tips for machine quilting. Best advice is practice, practice and more practice. Start small until you are comfortable with your quilting then move up to bigger quilts. Oh, another bit of advice is to have patience with your learning curve. After a while FMQ will be like treadling.
    Sweet Caroline

  5. #15
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Shelbie,
    What is a STD?

    Donna,
    I have a low shank 1/4" foot with the edge guide. I know it's a crutch, but for consistency it will help. I'm going to use it on all the machines it will fit. I've already used it to assemble the quilted cover for my #2 treadle. I like it for consistency.
    For the others I'll be measuring the seam I get with the foot and adjusting the bed mounted seam guide accordingly.
    This will be a big project cos I have 6.5" squares and 3.5" squares that when sewed together make 6.5" squares. Eeeeee gads. But I'm using scraps so beggars can't be choosers, can we?

    Caroline,
    I'm practicing now on a smaller quilt that is actually a cover for the #2 treadle. It's top is complete, we're cutting and piecing the batting now ( made a boo boo and cut it wrong ... Grrrrrr ) But it's purpose is to keep cat claws off the wood so it can have a few .... learning curves.

    Patience ....... sadly that is an inconsistent quality for me. Sometimes and with some things I have the patience of Job. Other times I want it done NOW, 15 minutes ago! Maybe by the time I take the big dirt nap I'll master that ..... .

    Joe

  6. #16
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by masufa View Post
    I like to starch the back very well and pin pin pin lots of pins. Then I divide the quilt into 4 sections starting straight down the middle and then accros the middle,In the beginning I actually used painted tape to divide the sections. I start to quilt in the top right section and work down then turn the quilt and quilt the lower left up to the top left this way you only have half of the quilt under the machine at any time and you aren't tusseling it around as much.
    I'm not sure about the starch part,but I think dividing it into quarters is a dandy idea.

    I'm gonna have to bookmark this thread. Lots of great advise.

    Joe

  7. #17
    Senior Member
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    Practice on some small pieces first, potholders and placemats. Stretch your quilt snadwich on a flat surface, (I use three folding tables at the church where we meet). Pin, pin, and pin some more. There is that point when you first start that says "this looks awful" but keep going, the more quilting you do the better it looks. Roll your quilt sandwich and keep all stress off the area you are working on.
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  8. #18
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
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    All have given you wonderful suggestions.

    The time spent in preparing the quilt for quilting makes a huge difference in the quilting too. I have tried spray basting, only to have a gummed up needles and machine which then produces skipped stitches. I no longer spray baste because of that and also because the stuff is bad for one's lungs.
    Instead, I hand baste using the Sharon Schamber method:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA. I found this method to work the best for me. It does take some extra time to do this method of hand basting, but well worth the time.

  9. #19
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagemotif View Post
    All have given you wonderful suggestions.

    The time spent in preparing the quilt for quilting makes a huge difference in the quilting too. I have tried spray basting, only to have a gummed up needles and machine which then produces skipped stitches. I no longer spray baste because of that and also because the stuff is bad for one's lungs.
    Instead, I hand baste using the Sharon Schamber method:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA. I found this method to work the best for me. It does take some extra time to do this method of hand basting, but well worth the time.
    I use the Schamber method also. I have hand basted and pin basted using her method. The key is the way the quilt sandwich is rolled on the boards.
    Sweet Caroline

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