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Thread: question about replacing wires

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    question about replacing wires

    maybe I should say cords and wires? ok I'm curious- after being too busy to fix up machines I'm wondering just how hard/complicated it is to do wiring? I saw a link to a website and it looked pretty straightforward but somehow I don't think soldering is gonna be that easy... the only reason I'm asking is that I keep coming across machines I like and could probably clean but they need wiring. I would be afraid to use them as-is..and I read someone say 'just duct tape it' but is that really safe? would it work? I thin I'd still be afraid to use it! I'm still searching on youtube for videos since I do better seeing something but just wondering if there's anyone who had never done soldering into the motor, etc and gave it a try and found it not so bad or maybe the opposite- not worth it ever again!
    Susanna

  2. #2
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    I have a 66 Redeye that I need to re-wire. Actually just picked it up from the repair shop (wanted the tension mechanism replaced but they couldn't get the part) and the guy there mentioned the wiring should be replaced. Said to him since it was just simple lamp-cord wire - shouldn't be a big deal. I don't know how much (if any) soldering would be involved - should be a matter of stripping off the casing of the new wiring and winding under the appropriate screws. Won't have time to really play with this machine for a while.

  3. #3
    Senior Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    It's something I want to learn how to do. My boss doesn't think the old machines are worth re-wiring. He doesn't want to do it. So he usually tells the customers, he won't do it. We fix cut wires with connectors and electrical tape, when the customer doesn't want to pay for a new foot control. But some of these machines don't have any insulation left on the wire -- that's when it's dangerous. I can solder a new capacitor into a foot control, but no one has ever taught me the right way to do it. The local tech college has a soldering class, that I'd love to take. Maybe there's a class near you.
    Annette in Utah

  4. #4
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    that's a good idea Annette hadn't thought about a class for soldering..wish there was one for sewing machine stuff - there's stuff for featherweights but just routine maintenance -tried talking that shop into offering stuff for other machines and wiring and heavy duty cleaning...no luck they dont' have time either
    Susanna

  5. #5
    Senior Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    It seems like there are fewer sewing machine mechanics out there. So those of us crazy enough to do it, are really busy. And today, we were just talking about how many machines we get from out of town, and even out of state. My boss is a very honest man, and can't make himself charge more than $50 for a service. I think he might be the least expensive in the country. And he's good at it, and has been doing it for 30 + years. I wish I could get as good as him, and teach it. There's just soooooo many variables in sewing machine repair.
    Annette in Utah

  6. #6
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    would be nice if he could do lessons on youtube LOL! good camera and talk us through it. I did find out from someone atwork that I should check with our I&E department of maintenance- hadn't thought about them. I only know one guy in the group but he's an older guy and really nice. he night could help me out...
    Susanna

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    LADIES, PLEASE, NEVER, NEVER just duck-tape it. Yes, that would be VERY DANGEROUS, both to you physically and to your home from a fire-standpoint! My son worked on sewing machines for 14 years, but doesn't do that type of work now on a full-time basis! My only concern is BE VERY CAREFUL and DON'T CUT CORNERS on wiring.

    Jeanette

  8. #8
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanette Frantz View Post
    LADIES, PLEASE, NEVER, NEVER just duck-tape it.... Jeanette
    Good advice!!

    Especially now that we have.....(drum roll please)....GORILLA TAPE!

    (Sorry, I couldn't resist)

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  9. #9
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltedsunshine View Post
    It's something I want to learn how to do. My boss doesn't think the old machines are worth re-wiring. He doesn't want to do it. So he usually tells the customers, he won't do it. We fix cut wires with connectors and electrical tape, when the customer doesn't want to pay for a new foot control. But some of these machines don't have any insulation left on the wire -- that's when it's dangerous. I can solder a new capacitor into a foot control, but no one has ever taught me the right way to do it. The local tech college has a soldering class, that I'd love to take. Maybe there's a class near you.
    I think that's a "Time is Money" type decision. It takes more time to rewire a machine than to just hook up a new cord set and controller. Parts cost is passed onto the customer.
    It makes sense for me to rewire machines because it's cheaper to buy the supplies than it is to buy a new cord set and controller.
    Soldering isn't hard to learn. A good electrical repair book and a few youtube videos might be enough to get you started.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  10. #10
    Super Member Cari-in-Oly's Avatar
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    Rain is pretty thorough in his lessons- he shows how to solder wires.

    http://vssmb.blogspot.com/2012/01/co...ted-motor.html

    Cari

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