Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: R. O. T. or ball park setting for .....

  1. #1
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,607

    R. O. T. or ball park setting for .....

    Reference 15 Clones:

    Is there a rule of thumb, or a ball park setting for the distance the needle bar rises after BDC, when the hook point is centered behind the needle?

    And is there a rule of thumb, or a ball park setting for the needle depth at BDC?

    I've got several clones, over a half dozen, and they are not the same. Some work good and some are cranky, but no two are exactly the same.

    Some have timing marks and some don't. But even with those that have timing marks, when the timing marks are lined up the needle points are not in the same place relative to the hook point.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  2. #2
    Super Member manicmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,123
    In all the machines I've timed, the manuals or guides say that the needle hole should be 1/16" below the hook point. Just checked the 15-91 adjuster's manual (p.25) and it says the same thing, so I'm pretty sure it's right.
    My Singers: 12k (1883), VS2 Roses and Daisies (1891), VS2 Victorian (1891), Improved Family (15-1, 1886), 15k (1917), 27 Tiffany (1900), 29k58, 96k41 (1947), 96k41 (1949), 201k (1953), 201p (1958) 206k11 (1950), 222k (1954), 222k (1959), 306k, 320k2(1959), 401g (1960), 411g
    Others: Empisal (1960s), Bernina Record 530-2, Pfaff 60, Pfaff 260, Lemair (1960s)

  3. #3
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,607
    Mike,

    1/16", OK, I'll put that in my memory box and check those machines that actually sew properly. From my minds eye they were very close to that.
    Then I'll recheck the malcontents and go from there.

    Thanks.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    Joe,

    For timing the industry standard for needlebar rise from BDC is .093mm. At this point the tip of the hook is just barely behind the needle and usually in the middle of the scarf when set at straight stitch and center needle position.

    The hook timing is always set before the needle height. Then it will be easy the gauge the height for the needlebar.




    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Reference 15 Clones:

    Is there a rule of thumb, or a ball park setting for the distance the needle bar rises after BDC, when the hook point is centered behind the needle?

    And is there a rule of thumb, or a ball park setting for the needle depth at BDC?

    I've got several clones, over a half dozen, and they are not the same. Some work good and some are cranky, but no two are exactly the same.

    Some have timing marks and some don't. But even with those that have timing marks, when the timing marks are lined up the needle points are not in the same place relative to the hook point.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  5. #5
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,607
    Cathy, are you sure that .093 mm? 93 thousands of a mm??? A mm isn't very big to start with and that .093 would be just a hair over 9 hundredths of a mm.

    Could it .093" maybe?

    Just checking to be sure, not trying to be a PITA.

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  6. #6
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,607
    Oh, and, on the clones I'm working with their hook drive shaft connections are all pinned solid. No way to adjust the hook timing that I know of. Is there a way I'm missing?

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    Yup, .093". Brain out to lunch again. You are not being a PITA. Thank you for pointing out my mis-typing.

    Cathy

    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Cathy, are you sure that .093 mm? 93 thousands of a mm??? A mm isn't very big to start with and that .093 would be just a hair over 9 hundredths of a mm.

    Could it .093" maybe?

    Just checking to be sure, not trying to be a PITA.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    No, you are not missing anything. The machines that are pinned are considered to never go out of time.


    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Oh, and, on the clones I'm working with their hook drive shaft connections are all pinned solid. No way to adjust the hook timing that I know of. Is there a way I'm missing?

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  9. #9
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    6,607
    Cathy,

    I did some measuring of the needle bar BDC to needle alignment on three different machines and got three different measurements. I think the shortest stroke was .059" and the longest was .090" with the middle one at .081". I know the needle bar can be adjusted up or down, but I can't see any way to adjust the stroke of the needle bar.

    So what to check next?

    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northern CA near Sacramento
    Posts
    1,105
    Joe,

    The .093" is an industry standard, but it is also sometimes to the factory assembly person a starting point. If the hook is pinned, then the only thing you need to be concerned with is the needlebar height. Put the hook tip behind the needle, then set the height so the tip of the hook is about in the middle of the scarf. On these old straight class 15 machines, Ray White says the timing is not as critical as the zig zag machines. He said that your difference measurements are acceptable. Remember. If it ain't broke (it sews well) don't fix.


    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Cathy,

    I did some measuring of the needle bar BDC to needle alignment on three different machines and got three different measurements. I think the shortest stroke was .059" and the longest was .090" with the middle one at .081". I know the needle bar can be adjusted up or down, but I can't see any way to adjust the stroke of the needle bar.

    So what to check next?

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.