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Thread: Still looking at treadles, and have another question...

  1. #1
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    Still looking at treadles, and have another question...

    Do the 3/4 size machines hold as much thread on the round bobbins as those on full size machines? Again, many thanks for all your expertise! I promise I'll let you all know what I end up buying. I seem to be narrowing this search down a bit. Definitely decided I want a round bobbin, not a shuttle (at least I've figured that out, lol!) I'm considering a a Red Eye Treadle and a Singer 3/4 size 15 treadle right now.

  2. #2
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    The 15 is considered a full sized machine, though the throat area is somewhat smaller than the 66. I don't know for sure but I think the 28/128 machines use the same bobbins as the 27/127. The 99 (the 3/4 66, though the number is 3/2 instead) uses the same bobbins as the 66 - same amount of thread.

  3. #3
    Muv
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    Hello JustAbitCrazy,

    If you are aiming for free motion quilting in the future get a class 15. I've just done a video on Youtube showing FMQ if you are interested. If you get the chance of a good Singer 15 treadle I would always put that at the top of the list. You can do more with it.

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    Hi, Muv
    No, I'm not planning to do fmq with a treadle, just piecing if the power goes out.

    I'm considering what I think is a Singer Model 66 treadle (serial number G8352676. Is that a Model 66-1? On ISMACS I couldn't find serial numbers for machines made in Germany, and doesn't that "G" in the serial number mean it was made in Germany? Maybe because the Russians took all the Singer machinery and destroyed all the records? I have so many questions!)

    I'm also considering a Singer treadle with the serial number G0091501, which I believe was also made in Germany and is a Model 16 machine (2,000 made, Jan. 8, 1910. Am I right or wrong?).

    Lastly, there's a Singer treadle which the seller says is a Model 66, from 1916. This one confuses me because the serial number is G4484745, and when I found that number, I see Model 44, 5,000 made April 20,1910. I haven't phoned this seller yet... confused.

    Again, appreciate any help here!

  5. #5
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    I got a treadle red eye Singer! I really like it! Mine also is an electric so whether the power goes off or not I am in business. Well not really in business, but you know what I mean.

  6. #6
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    Serial number G8352676 (see page 31) is a model 66 with a production starting date of 8-25-20.
    Serial number G0091501 (see page 37) is a model 66 with production starting date of 5-28-1923.

    Serial number G4484745 (see page 17) is also a model 66 with a production starting date of 2-24-16. You needed to be much further down the list. It is a very common mistake to stop looking too soon on the G serial numbers. You looked at the 6 digit numbers instead of the 7 digit numbers. This machine was made in Elizabethport, NJ not Germany. German serial numbers start with a 'C' if I remember correctly.

    Cathy








    Quote Originally Posted by JustAbitCrazy View Post
    Hi, Muv
    No, I'm not planning to do fmq with a treadle, just piecing if the power goes out.

    I'm considering what I think is a Singer Model 66 treadle (serial number G8352676. Is that a Model 66-1? On ISMACS I couldn't find serial numbers for machines made in Germany, and doesn't that "G" in the serial number mean it was made in Germany? Maybe because the Russians took all the Singer machinery and destroyed all the records? I have so many questions!)

    I'm also considering a Singer treadle with the serial number G0091501, which I believe was also made in Germany and is a Model 16 machine (2,000 made, Jan. 8, 1910. Am I right or wrong?).

    Lastly, there's a Singer treadle which the seller says is a Model 66, from 1916. This one confuses me because the serial number is G4484745, and when I found that number, I see Model 44, 5,000 made April 20,1910. I haven't phoned this seller yet... confused.

    Again, appreciate any help here!
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  7. #7
    Muv
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    Hello JABC,

    Here are the serial numbers so you can date a machine http://www.singerco.com/support/mach.../single-letter

    And here is an excellent website for you to go to so you can recognise models by looking at them http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk

    If you only intend to use a treadle for piecing the size is not so important because you will be able to place the bulk of your work to the left - whereas with quilting you need plenty of space to the right. You will do just as well with a model 99.

    The general principle when buying a treadle is that any treadle will do anything you want to do with a straight stitch, and with a class 15 you have the added bonus of free motion work. First and foremost look for a clean machine in good working condition. That is more important than anything else. Considerations about models, long bobbins or round bobbins etc. etc. take second place.

  8. #8
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    Mizkaki, ty so much for straightening me out with those numbers! I thought I must be brain dead to not be able to read numbers, straight up. When I go to the ISMACS numbers list, it shows up as one loooong page for me, not separate pages, though.

    Muv-Thanks for the other links. I saved them into my favorites, along with the others previously mentioned. For me, the problem with finding a machine in good working condition is that none of these machines have a belt. I can hand turn the wheel and see if what happens looks like normal movement to me, but if there's a broken lever (or whatever) on the wrought iron works below, I'll be clueless....And it seems most of these owners know less than I do (if you can believe that, lol!) The only reason I'm trying to determine specifically which model treadle may be best suited for me (long or round bobbin, etc.) is because I only have space for one, and don't want to regret my choice later when I'm more knowledgeable.

    Thus it's wonderful to have a great place for such advice, and I appreciate every comment!

  9. #9
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    You're welcome. My list is also one long page, but it is grouped into segments (pages). My list on my computer is a copy of the one that the ISMACS list was made from. The new ISMACS list is really nice.

    Cathy


    Quote Originally Posted by JustAbitCrazy View Post
    Mizkaki, ty so much for straightening me out with those numbers! I thought I must be brain dead to not be able to read numbers, straight up. When I go to the ISMACS numbers list, it shows up as one loooong page for me, not separate pages, though.
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  10. #10
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    This may be useful, if you haven't come across it already

    http://www.treadleon.net/sewingmachi...ngtreadle.html

    If I only had room for one machine I would like to have one with reverse stitch, two of my vintage singers have this feature and two don't. I really miss it when sewing with the two that don't have it.

    Another consideration is the "newer" singers (1960's) electric machines, the ones that can also be treadled, then you have the option of zig zag stitching etc.

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