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Thread: Treadle Iron Brazing

  1. #1
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Treadle Iron Brazing

    Has anyone had cast iron treadle frame breaks brazed?

    Recently, a New Home Climax joined my collection of treadles. Unfortunately a part of the cast iron was broken right where the treadle wheel connects. At $35 my investment is minimal and the machine is in decent shape.

    I'd love to hear how others have fixed the cast iron portion of their treadles. I know that welding the usual way is not possible!
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  2. #2
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    No I haven't, but I'll watch this thread cos I have two treadle bases that need brazed.

    Joe

  3. #3
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Cast iron can be welded, but it's not an easy process, and from what I understand, it's not a strong fix. I think I'd look to replace rather than repair...
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    I've had cast iron brazed before and it's lasted some 30 odd years. The jack handle from my 78 Toyota Land Cruiser.

    Anywho, a local machine, welding, fabrication shop says they can do it but it will cost me around $70.00 for the two breaks on the first frame.
    I've been told by another welder that's because it takes a special rod to do the job and make it right.

    Joe

  5. #5
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    There are "special" rods... The normal ones are just high nickle content, then there are the "secret" special ones that promise the world but can be used with a hair dryer ......the real cost in what you were quoted is in labor. To do a real good cast iron weld requires a good preheat and carefully post repair heat treat of the whole area. Cast is very prone to cracking after the repair. I happen to be staying with a relative that is a certified welding instructor....I will pick his brain tomarrow. I'll let you all know.

  6. #6
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greywuuf View Post
    There are "special" rods... The normal ones are just high nickle content, then there are the "secret" special ones that promise the world but can be used with a hair dryer ......the real cost in what you were quoted is in labor. To do a real good cast iron weld requires a good preheat and carefully post repair heat treat of the whole area. Cast is very prone to cracking after the repair. I happen to be staying with a relative that is a certified welding instructor....I will pick his brain tomarrow. I'll let you all know.
    I know a welder and he wouldn't touch it because cast iron doesn't take well to regular welding. I do know that it can be done because my dad would do it. I've heard about "cast iron welding rod" before. I'll be ready and waiting for your post tomorrow!
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  7. #7
    Super Member jlhmnj's Avatar
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    A good welder with an oxyacetylene torch and tanks can do it no problem. We've had lots of cast farm machinery brazed. Whether it's feasible for a treadle base would depend on the value placed on the base minus the cost of the job.

    Jon

  8. #8
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    The problem of simply replacing the broken part is that all treadle bases are not the same size. I've tried a couple times to replace the broken piece on my 9W-7 treadle and both replacement pieces were a different size. They looked the same, but off buy a bit.
    Luckily the second one is close enough to be used.
    If I could find a welder that would do the job for a price I could afford I'd have it repaired .

    Joe

  9. #9
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    My DH is taking it to be brazed today. The work is being done by a gunsmith/machinist/welder. Updates to be posted as available.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  10. #10
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbugsullivan View Post
    My DH is taking it to be brazed today. The work is being done by a gunsmith/machinist/welder. Updates to be posted as available.
    Ought to work if the guy is good at his job. My Dad brazed the arm on a FW that carries the thread up and down as it stitches. THe local sewing shop didn't want to touch the job and didn't think it could be done. Still working fine after 30 years.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

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