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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

  1. #41291
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I looked up that model and it is similar in shape to our 4622A. To pull the top off that one you have to first remove the nose piece, one screw down towards the bottom, then under the left end of the top you have to loosen a screw that holds a sheet metal part that's attached to the underside of the top.
    Then there is one screw through the top at the left end, and two screws through the top at the right end.
    After that you have to remove the knob from the stitch length lever and then wriggle the top off.

    Now, since you can't figure it out yours might not have the screws on the top. The few pics of that model I found are so small I couldn't see what I was looking at.
    Could you post a couple close ups of the top and front?

    I can tell you that the internal parts are stamped sheet metal and plastic. There isn't much to lube on the sheet metal, but the plastic "might" have been greased in the past. I had to clean the old grease off the gears in our machine because it had become stiff and gummy. Tri-Flow grease did wonders after that.
    The shafts are steel and pass through bushings in the aluminum body. T/F helps there too.
    And under the nose piece there are many moving ZZ mechanisms you can't see well, but if you can get the T/F oil to them you'll think you just got a new machine.

    Will try to find better pix and or manuals.

    Joe
    I'll try to get some pics. I got the 3 screws in the top, the nose end, front knobs and the hand wheel end off. Something is hanging up by the handle on the right - deep in the bowels of the machine. The machine seems to turn just fine but I want to grease and oil all that sheet metal and plastic gears - maybe someone can get some use out of it. It is suppose to do some nice stretch stitches.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  2. #41292
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    We paid $7.00 for our 4622A at a yard sale. It needed one part that cost about $10.00. Then it needed lubed and now it does excellent stretch stitches. No external cams, just internal ones and it's simple to use. That is the only reason it's still here and hasn't been rehomed.

    Have you removed all the little knobs at the top of the front if they pass through the top piece?

    Joe

  3. #41293
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Yeah I pulled the little knobs off. Something is hung up by the right side handle somewhere. I'll have to look it over next time I get to the shop. I'll have to deal with the accident stuff tomorrow and work a couple hours.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  4. #41294
    Senior Member frudemoo's Avatar
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    Well, I had a thorough look at my Necchi Supernova Automatica machine last night and it's the first machine I've ever owned that was as dirty as a barbecue! The other machines I've come to own have seemed more clean and dry, even if they are dirty in areas and have packed in lint etc. This one is like a grease pit!! All the lint and dirt is stuck on with this brown grease.

    Anyway, I set to work in grease removal as I figured that would be the only way to remove all the unwanted dirt. It also looks like it's all built up around the moving parts so I suppose it won't work as smoothly unless it gets removed and replaced with fresh oil.

    My question is... How far should I take it? I've noticed some people talk about sitting their mechanical machines in a bucket of soapy water (and now I know why!!) but this machine has electrics underneath. Am I attempting to get all the parts back to 'shiny and new' or just 'serviceable'? ....and what should I be using to remove it?

    I hope someone out there will be patient enough to explain this stuff to me. I am SO desperate to learn how to do all of this myself, but every time I look at a new machine there are always new issues and new questions. Also the mechanics are a lot more complicated than for a simple SS machine. There is a nifty button that you're supposed to be able to turn and push down to drop the feed dogs. It's a spring loaded mechanism that is so sluggish it does absolutely nothing, plus the area around the feed dogs is all black and gunged up anyway, so it's hard to know what end the problem might be at. If I could get THAT working again, I would be as pleased as punch

  5. #41295
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frudemoo View Post
    Well, I had a thorough look at my Necchi Supernova Automatica machine last night and it's the first machine I've ever owned that was as dirty as a barbecue! The other machines I've come to own have seemed more clean and dry, even if they are dirty in areas and have packed in lint etc. This one is like a grease pit!! All the lint and dirt is stuck on with this brown grease.

    Anyway, I set to work in grease removal as I figured that would be the only way to remove all the unwanted dirt. It also looks like it's all built up around the moving parts so I suppose it won't work as smoothly unless it gets removed and replaced with fresh oil.

    My question is... How far should I take it? I've noticed some people talk about sitting their mechanical machines in a bucket of soapy water (and now I know why!!) but this machine has electrics underneath. Am I attempting to get all the parts back to 'shiny and new' or just 'serviceable'? ....and what should I be using to remove it?

    I hope someone out there will be patient enough to explain this stuff to me. I am SO desperate to learn how to do all of this myself, but every time I look at a new machine there are always new issues and new questions. Also the mechanics are a lot more complicated than for a simple SS machine. There is a nifty button that you're supposed to be able to turn and push down to drop the feed dogs. It's a spring loaded mechanism that is so sluggish it does absolutely nothing, plus the area around the feed dogs is all black and gunged up anyway, so it's hard to know what end the problem might be at. If I could get THAT working again, I would be as pleased as punch
    I have asked myself the same question - how deep do you clean. It is almost easier when you get a really gross old machine and nothing to lose. The other day I spent a long time cleaning up on an old clone. It was really filthy - tar like stuff on the out side and some on the inside. I worked and worked to get it all off. Some things were stripped off and dumped in a bucket of soapy water. Then I still had to use chrome polish to clean up chrome. The parts that come off are for sure easier to clean. I just clean a zone then put it back and clean another zone. This one I did was such a mess I figured it was either going to clean up and work or it would be for parts.

    Then I cleaned up on a White zz - it was sort of dirty but not too bad. It actually didn't get the cleaning the 15 got. I sort of wondered if I needed to get that aggressive with the White or not. I decided not. It sews just fine. It looks fine. It could have some of the exterior oil off the moving parts but why. I think some of that oil is protective anyway.

    Then I checked on my Singer 319 which has set for way too long. It was fairly thoroughly cleaned a while back. It was gummed up when I checked it. I'm pretty sure I used Tri-flo on it... but then again maybe not. I don't really remember. Maybe it was from before I discovered the joys of T-F? Maybe something needed some more cleaning. That machine was horrible. Here is a link: Singer 319 in need of TLC Another thing on my never ending to do list. I would also go about cleaning it different these days... sigh. always learning.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  6. #41296
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    Quote Originally Posted by frudemoo View Post
    Thanks Jan. It's interesting, some people say to use WD-40 for certain things. I have used it to get screws unstuck, for example. Very careful not to get it near paintwork. Is that the reason for your emphasis, or is there some other reason not to use it that I should be aware of?
    This is true. WD-40 really leaves behind residue that attracts crud... I used to use it for everything. Not I only use it to clean armor. Great with a green scrubbie for removing rust.

    On sewing machines I ONLY use Tri-Flow as a lubricant.

    As to bolt freeing, I start with Kroil (NOT an lubricant, it is WD-40 on steroids without the residue) It is actually referred to in its litrature as "the oil that creeps" If that does not work I spray some PB-Blaster into a cup and then apply it with q-tips. This is available at most auto parts stores. I learned about it when I owned two 1966 barracuda's... old rusty outdoor bolts.... The last level is a heat gun (hair dryer is better) I have not had that fail yet.

  7. #41297
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    This is true. WD-40 really leaves behind residue that attracts crud... I used to use it for everything. Not I only use it to clean armor. Great with a green scrubbie for removing rust.

    On sewing machines I ONLY use Tri-Flow as a lubricant.

    As to bolt freeing, I start with Kroil (NOT an lubricant, it is WD-40 on steroids without the residue) It is actually referred to in its litrature as "the oil that creeps" If that does not work I spray some PB-Blaster into a cup and then apply it with q-tips. This is available at most auto parts stores. I learned about it when I owned two 1966 barracuda's... old rusty outdoor bolts.... The last level is a heat gun (hair dryer is better) I have not had that fail yet.
    Steve, I was talking to a friend yesterday about mechanical stuff and Kroil came up. How would you rate it with Tri-Flow?
    ~G~

  8. #41298
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Where do you buy Kroil?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

  9. #41299
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant15clone View Post
    Steve, I was talking to a friend yesterday about mechanical stuff and Kroil came up. How would you rate it with Tri-Flow?
    ~G~
    Different functions.

    Tri_Flow is a lubricant. it has a silicon base so even when it dries it leaves behind a lubricant (dry silicon)

    Kroil is a penetrating oil. it's function is to seep into cracks and crevasses and soften any existing rust and/or contaminants. It is almost anti oil.

    This stuff REALLY has a amazingly low surface tension... Take two flat plates of material. Put on one drop of other stuff (Tri-Flow, WD-40, sewing machine oil, etc) and on the other put one drop of Kroil. In a few hours you will see the Kroil one has spread out WAY more than any of the others. I buy mine from McMaster Carr http://www.mcmaster.com/

  10. #41300
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    hey At the rate I've acquired treadles I'm thinking it will make more sense to just buy a whole spool of leather for belts. Does anyone have a recommendation of a place I can buy it and the staples used for them? I could use 4 or 5 belts right now as it is.

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