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Thread: Vintage Sewing Machine Shop Machine Photos

  1. #1611
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    Nice machine, vridar.... and the stitching looks great. I also have a 28 that I cleaned up a couple of years ago. I need to adjust the belt and I should look up the date again. I need to make a ledger of my machines so I don't forget their birthdays.
    --- Jean

    I'd rather spend money on my quilting hobby than the therapist.... I'm probably $$$ ahead.... and I'm happy!!

  2. #1612
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    I just finished a couple of machines and thought I would share. First is a 1919 Singer Red Eye. It was in pretty bad shape before I started. Here are some before and after pictures.
    ~G~

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  3. #1613
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Another machine I just finished with was a 1921 Singer 128. I changed it over to a hand crank in the process.
    ~G~

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  4. #1614
    Senior Member
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    that looks amazing. miles away in looks from before. great job giving it a TLC.

  5. #1615
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    wow such great work. thank you for sharing
    😊 wilburness 😊

  6. #1616
    Senior Member amcatanzaro's Avatar
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    Those are so amazing.

    Is there a tutorial around here for putting a hand crank on?
    Anastasia - I like to sew square things.

  7. #1617
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    how did you make all those metals shiny ? dremel, metal polisher ? i have used Brasso but it's not making the metal shiny.

  8. #1618
    Senior Member grant15clone's Avatar
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    Thank you for the kind words.
    Anistasia, It is about as simple as unbolting the motor and bolting on the hand crank. This is a reproduction hand crank. You just need a Singer machine that has a spoked handwheel. I have seen a tutorial about notching a solid handwheel, but it is pretty involved and the results are iffy IMHO.
    vmaniqui, I have been polishing them up with a cordless (much slower speed than corded) Dremel with the felt buffing wheel and jewelers rouge and following up with wadding polish for years and have had great results. The faceplate on the 66 was bad so I took a chance on it to see what would happen if I used a brass brush. It is now going to be what I do on a lot of them if they are rusty or really bad. As long as you can polish it up with a dremel or other buffing wheel after to clean up the small scratches it leaves behind you may want to try it on something that is in bad shape to see what it does. The brush can get in the fine detail really well and it takes off the first layer of rust really quickly. Buffing wheels can also leave behind minute scratches that look like swirl marks after you wax a car. On small areas they are not as noticeable, but on something like a slideplate, you will notice it.
    I hope this answers your questions. If not you can always message me.
    ~G~

  9. #1619
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amcatanzaro View Post
    Those are so amazing. Is there a tutorial around here for putting a hand crank on?
    No tutorial needed. Take off the motor, keep the boss screw. Line up the handcrank's base with the groove for the electric motor. Slide the base into place, flip the lever up, into the gaps in the handwheel, and tighten the boss screw.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  10. #1620
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbugsullivan View Post
    No tutorial needed. Take off the motor, keep the boss screw. Line up the handcrank's base with the groove for the electric motor. Slide the base into place, flip the lever up, into the gaps in the handwheel, and tighten the boss screw.
    Very good instructions!
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    Success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts. Winston Churchill

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