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Thread: could you edit a book?

  1. #1
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    could you edit a book?

    One of my nieces who was an editor at Harlequin has just branched out on her own.... I just can't imagine having the nerve to do that... guess 20 years difference in age is the answer, whew!
    I have recently been trying to cut and follow a pattern that was authored and edited.... I hate to admit it.... but.... maybe I need to confine myself to repeated patterns?

  2. #2
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    Nope, I could not edit a book. Once I see something written I have a hard time getting it out of my mind, even if I know it could be phrased better. I dreaded having to edit reports at work.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I could, but I wouldn't like it. Have done a lot of editing of college papers in my lifetime. Nowadays, I'd rather be quilting!

    Is your niece doing freelance editing? I'm thinking that university campuses would be a good place to advertise.

  4. #4
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I sometimes edit for my DH who is a writer. But he's wary of me being too critical, so usually has a friend do his initial x3 editing--I usually get to read stuff when it's copy ready--and then I catch the misspells and typos! I'm not so great with grammar stuff though.

  5. #5
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I could and would probably like it. I used to do a lot of editing for my husband when we were starting the business and he had to write quote for clients. I sometimes think I missed my calling life and should have been a research assistant or editor.
    Patrice S

  6. #6
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I've edited for my DH, and both my daughters through college and later works/letters/papers/etc. They are all much more "educated" than I am, but I had the better grade school and high school English teachers than they did. Plus I adored creative writing and had an incredibly supportive high school teacher for it who hand-picked me for her class. I was truly blessed. I also love to read, that helps me as an occasional "wordsmith".

    Jan in VA
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    I recently edited a book for a friend who writes books about overcoming the trauma of sexual abuse. Tough material to deal with, but it needed spelling, grammar and sometimes intent. She is a wonderful person and writer, but didn't have the same English teachers Jan did. Years ago I corrected college English papers for my second daughter. She was a great teacher and writer, but not speller, nor could she identify a run on sentence.
    So, yes, I could and have edited a book.

  8. #8
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I enjoy editing. Just one of those things. Some people enjoy it, some not so much. I work with a young author and have a couple friends who are authors. I enjoy being part of their Process.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  9. #9
    Super Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    I edit everything that I read... I just don't get paid for it!

    I mentally circle the errors on everything that I read. The only book that I have never found an error is the Bible. I haven't read all of the versions though.

  10. #10
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    I've edited things for my husband and sons. Enjoy it but don't know if I could edit anything as large as a book. My niece in Paris edits and translates books. She has such an interesting life!!

  11. #11
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I could easily do copy editing as I see mistakes in books from prominent publishers and wonder why no one caught them. Like site for sight, or one I just read where THREE TIMES the author referred to barium as what you drink to clean you out before a colonoscopy.

  12. #12
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I think so. For many years my job included interpreting federal policy and translating it into procedures the local workers could use. There was a lot of writing, editing, etc. and I did enjoy it. I always think that way now - what would make this less confusing, say it better, etc. Of course fiction would be different!!
    Alyce

  13. #13
    Senior Member Elise1's Avatar
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    https://www.reddit.com/r/mildlyinfur...een_that_hard/

    The editor of this children's book is clearly not up to the job, LOL!
    "Be brave enough to be who you really are.

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    That is hilarious!!!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 08-15-2017 at 07:36 AM. Reason: remove shouting/ all CAPS

  15. #15
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    Wow. That's hard to believe. If I had hired that editor, I'd have asked for my money back.

  16. #16
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    I spent several years writing for the Kansas City Star and several more editing contracts for a healthcare company. By far, the most enjoyable job (also lowest paying) was working on a grammar hotline while I taught at a community college. As quilters, we are detail-minded. I bet more of you could edit a book than you think. It is the same skill set: attentiveness, patience, willingness to reconstruct errors, and lifelong learning.
    "The great doing of little things makes the great life." Eugena Price

  17. #17
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    I could do it although it would not be my favorite thing. I was in the law biz (legal assistant) and so read everything the lawyers wrote, especially when we went digital (Spellcheck is not your friend). My local newspaper must have done away with editors. The grammatical errors and misspellings are rampant. The blame cannot be placed on the typesetter since everything is now digital.

  18. #18
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
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    I could edit a book. I used to write manuals for my department. Since I was writing them, I decided to pursue a technical writing certificate. I have always liked grammar. I'm with quilt9226 in noticing that it appears most "literary" sources have done away with editors. Not just newspapers, but online content and books. I used to find errors in self-published books, but now I see them in mainstream books as well. It is annoying.

    I found out a long time ago that Spellcheck is not your friend, since it only checks spelling and not grammar. Therefore, it will allow the wrong word to be used just because it is spelled correctly (their vs there). Spellcheck doesn't check grammatical correctness either. As it is named, it only checks spelling.

  19. #19
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    I used to write requirements for business systems. It involved writing my own requirements and critiqued others. My door was darkened many time by those wanting my editing skills. Now retired, I am called on to edit resumes fairly frequently. Lucky I like to do that.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  20. #20
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    I used to write requirements for business systems. It involved writing my own requirements and critiqued others. My door was darkened many time by those wanting my editing skills. Now retired, I am called on to edit resumes fairly frequently. Lucky I like to do that.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  21. #21
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    When I worked at a small rural hospital, I frequently was called on to proof letters going out from the head administrator. In fact, I had to correct an VIP in a staff meeting about some grammatical errors in a brochure going out. She was not pleased, and brought a dictionary to "prove" she was right. (I won the disagreement, though). I was an English teacher for 38 years and my background was solid from years ago. Our newspaper is now fraught with errors every day. The most egregious errors are clipped and sent to the offending writer.

  22. #22
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    I probably could but I don't think I'd enjoy it. If it were the type of thing I enjoy reading I would probably get into it and forget I was supposed to be being critical and only catch the glaring errors; and if it was not something I enjoyed reading I'd probably do a better editing job but then I think it'd bore and kind of aggravate me.

    I'm sure my formal English skills are lacking somewhat, as well. Although I DO know "they're" from "their", at least, and I can usually figure out when to put an apostrophe in "its"!

  23. #23
    Senior Member NatalieF's Avatar
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    I believe I could. I love to read and frequently edit letters at work. I've never edited a large document though. Like most of you, I find it painful when I see things either misspelled or a misused word in books or articles. Drives me absolutely bonkers.

    Another pet peeve of mine is when people completely omit punctuation! (frequent on Facebook) I find myself reading gibberish about 10 times over trying to figure out the writer's intent and give up because it hurts my brain. Even when I text, I write complete sentences. I can't stand "texting shorthand", such as "u" for "you".

    OK, now I need a glass of wine.

  24. #24
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
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    I have proofed/edited several books. The daughter of one of my friends writes romance novels, and I have helped her by reading them for grammar, spelling, punctuation and light content corrections. I don't do significant plot line or storyline editing. I found it is a totally different kind of reading, and having to concentrate on looking at each word and sentence structure takes concentration, but comes fairly natural for me. But, I don't think would do it as a fullime job!
    I just want to spend the rest of my life laughing.

  25. #25
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I could and would do it, and would love it.

    Today at work my co-worker got an email that drove both of us crazy. The author had phrased his sentences in such a way that you could interpret what he was saying in two completely opposite ways, and we could not figure out what he meant. Spelling and grammar were correct; phrasing and clarity were out the window.

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