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Thread: Here's what I want to make. What do I need to make it.?

  1. #26
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    our 1st winter in Indpls we stayed in a 24ft camper and of course it was their worst winter in 20yrs I made us a quilt out of Duck Cloth -doubled the poly-and used flannel for the back and just tied it It was for a full size bed I took it to a laundro-mat used a dbl frt. loader and it dried in less time than it took to wash All we used with it was a flannel top sheet We were toasty warm

  2. #27
    Super Member JoyjoyMarie's Avatar
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    I have to put in my two cents for warm sleeping. I used to live in some really cold places in the Rocky Mountains, and this is what I worked out for warm sleeping in a cold room.
    One: an electric mattress pad manually or set with a timer to warm the bed for an hour or two before bedtime, then off. Two: a wool blanket underneath top sheet.
    Three: A goosedown comforter with a washable duvet over us. (It's like sleeping under a cloud :)
    Four: a hot blooded sleeping partner. This bed is also easy to make in the morning, because you just shake the comforter and it falls to the bed. Easy peasy..

    So for your quilt, you might consider making it the top of a duvet cover, and the bottom could be a simple sheet.

  3. #28
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoyjoyMarie
    Four: a hot blooded sleeping partner.
    Oh. So you're ruling out vampires? ;-)

  4. #29
    Super Member JoyjoyMarie's Avatar
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    Those I wouldn't know about!!

  5. #30
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    I have a Velux blanket and a feather comforter. That keeps me warmer than anything.

  6. #31
    Senior Member roadrunr's Avatar
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    When I lived in China, I had no heat in the apartment and it would get pretty damp in the winter time ( I lived in southwest China and although it didn't get below freezing, it was very damp and you could feel the cold more). The school that I worked for provided blankets for us, but they weren't really warm, even having two on, so I bought a heavy cotton (yes cotton) duvet that weighed maybe 6 pounds adn that kept me very warm.So, my story is, if you get a heavy cotton comforter, that should keep you plenty warm - it all depends on the weight of the comforter or quilt. Wool is also a good choice.

  7. #32
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    Put a wool anything, old or new, blanket, afghan, fabric, etc UNDER the mattress pad. Kind of keeps it in place.

  8. #33
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    Maybe if the wool batting is too expensive you could go to a Goodwill or similar store and find a nice big wool blanket. I think Goodwill cleans their things so you would probably be okay.
    I have used Warm and Natural and it is pretty heavy.

  9. #34
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    We live in Northern MN and turn thermastat down to 58 @ night and sleep with the window open and heat off in our room and I have a comforter made from polyester batting from this company. http://okleequilting.com/store

    I use the 8 oz from here (Scroll down)
    http://okleequilting.com/store/index...f1ad44d184da68 It is nice and warm!! I love to sleep in the fresh air even in the winter It it gets to 20 below we shut the window but have it open at least a crack above 20 below out side.
    I don't think it can be quilted tho it has to be tied.
    I threw a piece in washing machine with a load of jeans with no cover on it and it never lost a bit of shape. Have used it for 25 years with none of the quilt batting "bunching up"
    They will send you a sample I believe.

  10. #35
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    you have so many good ideas here, I think most of them will work for you, but remember with wool, it`s costly making it and having it cleaned. Too many quilts can leave you tired in the morning when you get up. We have it cold here too, and use only 2 light weight quilts all winter long. I have the window open at the top until my DH finds out, but we never have heat on either in the bed room.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radiana
    Here's my problem. I need to use two comforters on my bed in winter time. We keep the heater down low at night. Even with a little portable heater I still need two comforters. I hate making the bed and trying to get them even.

    I want to eventually make a double bed size quilt for my room but I want it to be warm enough so that I don't need anything else with it. I was hoping someone could give me a suggestion as to what synthetic batting would be the best for warmth. I would send it off to be machine quilted but I'm thinking in terms of washing and drying it. I don't want it to take for ever to dry.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much.
    Just a quick note about making the bed easier - I have two quilts (store bought) on my bed. After fighting them for a while, I got the great idea to attach them to each other. I got out my trusty snap setter, and put snaps at each corner, and two on each side. they stay together until I unsnap them for washing! I have two slipped disks and anything that makes 'not bending' possible makes my life so much easier. I hope this will help you too! :thumbup:

  12. #37
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    We use flannel sheets all year long and in the winter we add a light blanket and a rag quilt. the rag quilts are easy to wash --in a laundramat, and are so warm. Flannel for the top and backing, and Warm and Natural for the batting.

  13. #38
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Here's some info from Kaye Wood that just about sums it up:

    More about batting!
    If you are looking for the most common, easiest to work with batting, you can't go wrong with either a cotton batting, made of natural fibers, or a polyester batting, made of synthetic fibers.
    Cotton is a very popular form of batting, because it is so versatile. On those shivery winter nights, cotton traps and absorbs the air, keeping you comfortably warm. However, it doesn't hold in the heat so when used in the summer, it will also keep you cooler. Cotton is thin in appearance and considered a low-loft batting, but it is heavier than polyester. Cotton batting also shifts and beards when you quilt with it, unless you get a bonded batting.
    Polyester on the other hand, can take wash after wash and still hold it's shape. Polyester batting is thicker, but the weight is still lighter than cotton batting. Polyester is great for keeping you warm without the bulky weight, but the fibers restrict air flow, so you can get very hot, very quickly! When you have to store your quilts, polyester is wonderful because it resists mold and mildew.
    Now if you would like to utilize the qualities that both of these battings have to offer, try using a cotton/poly blend! You won't get the excess weight and your quilt will have all the benefits these fine fibers have to offer!

  14. #39
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    Along with whatever you decide for your batting (and I would personally use the thickest poly I could find....have done one with really simple straight line quilting between vertical rows of 9-patch on point) have you thought of using flannel sheets?
    Flannel sheets along with flannel pj's under a really fluffy quilt and I'm good for the night. I have scleroderma and I turn blue very easily. (Living in cool, damp Oregon really doesn't help........ ;) ) Good luck........

  15. #40
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    I made a rag quilt with flannel for the top & bottom and washed wool for batting. It is for our camper and is super
    heavy & warm.

  16. #41
    Senior Member sew wishful's Avatar
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    You need an electic heating mattress pad. Lovely! Bet you will only need one quilt then.

  17. #42
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sew wishful
    You need an electic heating mattress pad. Lovely! Bet you will only need one quilt then.
    I agree with the above..

    also you can make a poly blanket.. I love mine, nice and heavy, super warm and holds up like iron.. Im sure you can find polyester in any thrift store too..

  18. #43

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    i made a quilt with alot of black and had a hard time finding dark batting. i used black fleece and machine quilted it. it worked very well, however, it is VERY heavy.



    Quote Originally Posted by Emma S
    Several people have mentioned fleece, I wonder if it could be used successfully as batting. Has anyone tried? Seems to me it would be light weight but very warm.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyscrappy
    i made a quilt with alot of black and had a hard time finding dark batting. i used black fleece and machine quilted it. it worked very well, however, it is VERY heavy.
    Hobbs Heirloom (80/20) and Warm&Natural (cotton) both have black battings.

    I have a bolt of the black W&N. The manager at the local Joann's approached me a couple of years ago and said she couldn't sell it, and it was taking up space. She sold it to be at a ridiculous discount. I think I paid under $20.

    It's great. Same quality and characteristics of the natural.

  20. #45
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    I'm always cold, my RN GD tells me it's my thyroid. I also no longer have a hot blooded sleeping mate, so have to rely on coverings to keep me warm at night. I wear heavy knitted socks and flannel gowns/pjs, flannel sheets and a down comforter. I sleep quite well then even with the heat set at 55=60 at night.
    That down comforter is my best friend. It's like sleeping under a cloud, like someone else just said. Love it.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    How about wool batting?

    Pricey (can be very, very pricey) but would be pretty warm.

    This is crazy expensive, but it looks luscious...
    http://www.shepherdsdream.com/p-40-e...l-batting.aspx


    maybe expensive but you would only use it once and merino blankets are twice the price.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by lisalisa
    wowo. That is expensive. My dear friend gave me an old, and probably expensive comforter from her mom. It was 80's style but super warm. I'm guessing it had this wool batting. I re-covered it with a pieced top and some 15 years later it's still the warmest thing ever.

    I've also used old electric blankets for batting and backing (with the wires removed obviously). The ones with the batting used as the backing are my snuggles that I always keep close by.
    Do I understand correctly? your batting is outside the quilt? sounds snuggly. How does it hold up?

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoyjoyMarie
    I have to put in my two cents for warm sleeping. I used to live in some really cold places in the Rocky Mountains, and this is what I worked out for warm sleeping in a cold room.
    One: an electric mattress pad manually or set with a timer to warm the bed for an hour or two before bedtime, then off. Two: a wool blanket underneath top sheet.
    Three: A goosedown comforter with a washable duvet over us. (It's like sleeping under a cloud :)
    Four: a hot blooded sleeping partner. This bed is also easy to make in the morning, because you just shake the comforter and it falls to the bed. Easy peasy..

    So for your quilt, you might consider making it the top of a duvet cover, and the bottom could be a simple sheet.
    :roll: Hope item #4 a joke; been laughing myself silly! at the thought of easy way to get warm blooded hubby awake.

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