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Thread: high efficiency top load washing machines....and quilts

  1. #1
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    high efficiency top load washing machines....and quilts

    i have to buy a new washing machine. love my front load HE washing machine...but am really looking hard at the top load HE's....does anyone have any opinions? do they eat quilts???

    betsey

  2. #2
    Senior Member quilter1943's Avatar
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    I continue to have mine (10 yrs old) repaired because of the stories I've heard about the high efficiency ones not allowing you to add enough water. Check it all out before you buy one, especially if it is a water saver. I don't aggitate my quilts, so "eating" them has never been a problem.
    Nana Jan
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I opted for a new top loader that does not agitate. It has a hand wash cycle that is perfect for washing fabric and quilts. It's different then the delicate cycle. I do not get thread tangles or raveling when washing fabric, even fat quarters. My laundry doesn't have heavy soiled items anymore from play or work so washing the clothes to death wasn't a concern when I was choosing a new washer. The washer does not fill up with water, it swishes and rotates. I don't think I saw a new toploader that had an agitator the moved the clothes like the washers use to be.
    Got fabric?

  4. #4
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    I have an LG top-loading HE washer. It's very large, has no agitator and has a see-through lid . . . and I love it! It adds water, according to the weight of the items being washed. Although the water level usually looks "too low," my clothes have always come out clean and well rinsed. If I want more water (for "first" washes), I wait until it adds water, then pause and open the lid; it thinks I'm adding more clothes and will add more water. For larger items like blankets/quilts, there's a "bulky bedding" setting, which fills the tub almost to the top. This is the one I have - http://www.bestbuy.com/site/LG+-+4.5+Cu.+Ft.+12-Cycle+Ultra+Capacity+High-Efficiency+Washer+-+White/9753888.p?id=1218167393996&skuId=9753888&st=LG wt5001c&cp=1&lp=1
    Neesie


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    Senior Member mosquitosewgirl's Avatar
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    Our son and DIL have a top-load, HE that does not have an agitator. With a new baby they are doing wash constantly. While I was there visiting, I had the opportunity to use it a couple of times and was very impressed. I have a front loader that I love, but when it needs to be replaced, I will be looking at the HE top-loader.
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    Thanks Neesie for your recommendation of the LG top-loading high efficiency washer. I have actually pinned it on Pinterest so when my current washing machine dies I will be able to remember what was recommended! I really dislike my current washing machine but it came with the house when we bought it and DH definitely doesn't believe in replacing appliances before they are worn out. He knows I don't like the one we have and is on notice that the new one won't be cheap!

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    The only comment I'll add here is to look at cycle length times. When researching a new dishwasher purchase, everything that I read said how the cycle times had been so extended. Because the DW's (and guessing clothes washers as well) are so low water consumption that the wash and rinse cycle times have been extended unbelieveably. My DW takes over 2 hours to run a cycle and that's without drying time! So, while we're saving water with our appliances, we're using considerably more electricity to run them!

  8. #8
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ Quilter View Post
    The only comment I'll add here is to look at cycle length times. When researching a new dishwasher purchase, everything that I read said how the cycle times had been so extended. Because the DW's (and guessing clothes washers as well) are so low water consumption that the wash and rinse cycle times have been extended unbelieveably. My DW takes over 2 hours to run a cycle and that's without drying time! So, while we're saving water with our appliances, we're using considerably more electricity to run them!
    I've no idea how long my dishwasher takes (also HE) but I do know if I need anything, in a hurry, to wash it by hand! LOL I think the longest my washing machine takes, is about 55 minutes. Problem is it's really hard to even find a good non-HE machine, anymore.
    Neesie


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    NJ Quilter has a point. My daughter has the newest front loader that they make. The wash cycle takes an hour from start to finish. My "old" washer takes 20 to 30 minutes. It would take less but it takes a long time to fill with water, and it has a super big tub. (When I got it I had several kids at home and lots of blue jeans to wash).
    Sue

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    i'm shopping on line currently. did go to home depot last night. unfortunatly, i don't have a choice, i do need to buy a new washing machine. as i have well water and septic...i do need to think about how many gallons of water i'll be using each load....

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    I absolutely despise my front loader washing machine and would throw it out if it hadn't cost over $1,000. It tangles all the sleeves and pant legs terribly and when you pull out one item they all some streaming out onto the floor. If it were a top loader they would fall back into the machine. I practically have to stand on my head to reach the items clinging to the back of the drum. Using color catchers is a hazard also. Because of the low water level it means there are many products that can't be used such as Retayne. The cheesy molding around the door has broken off in many places but the seal is still good. Apparently I'm not the only one with these complaints because the sale of the new top loaders has really taken off.

  12. #12
    Junior Member judys's Avatar
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    I have a HE front loader and would buy a top loader if I could do it over. I have always soaked my wool socks and such and spun them out, then taken them out, added rinse water, put them back to soak and spun them out before hanging them or laying them flat to dry. Can't do that with the front loader. Just hate having to wash them all by hand. I also used my old top loader to wash wool fleece for spinning and I can't do that either. Good thing I have a lifetime's worth of clean wool for spinning.
    Last edited by judys; 06-19-2012 at 10:07 AM. Reason: wrong word used

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    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    I'm on my second front loader (first one drowned in a basement flood) but you're all making really good arguments for the HE top loader. My sister has one and loves it.

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    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
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    I have a Maytag Bravio Top Load high efficiency washer and HATE it! I've had it for a couple of years now and am looking to replace it with a standard "old-style" topload.

    There are several things I do not like about it:

    It does not allow you to soak a load. If you pause the washer when there is water in it, it will automatically drain. Does the same thing if you shut it off when there is water in it.

    You cannot fill the washer first so that you can add detergent/bleach etc. directly to the water and then add the clothes. The bleach dispenser functionality is less than perfect, resulting in bleach spots on some items. If I want to soak a load in bleach before agitating, I fill a bucket, add bleach, add laundry, let soak, then pour the whole thing in the washer and start it. Then the washer proceeds to drain the bleach water off the laundry before starting its wash cycle... ARGH!

    It ties my clothes in knots, literally. When I take out a load of jeans or shirts, I have to spend 5 minutes untangling the legs/sleeves and untwisting them before I can dry them.

    You cannot control the water level or the agitation time. This often results in clothes that are less than clean when the cycle is finished.

    And don't even dream about putting anything delicate in it if you want to see it in one piece again!

    So... Until I replace it, I'm washing my blouses and delicates by hand in the kitchen sink and using the "drain and spin" cycle in the washer before I dry them.

    The fabric softener dispenser "spots" the clothes without fail.

    This is not exactly a leap forward in my laundry routine!
    Wendy

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    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by judys View Post
    I have a HE front loader and would buy a top loader if I could do it over. I have always soaked my wool socks and such and spun them out, then taken them out, added rinse water, put them back to soak and spun them out before hanging them or laying them flat to dry. Can't do that with the front loader. Just hate having to wash them all by hand. I also used my old top loader to wash wool fleece for spinning and I can't do that either. Good thing I have a lifetime's worth of clean wool for spinning.
    Can't do that with a top load HE washer either... My advice (and experience--see above), is to go with an old fashion top load if you want to do things like that.
    Wendy

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    I have an good ole Kenmore 90 series (Sears) The price was right and I got the largest tub they make. I can adjust the water levels. I can wash my 100 x 120 quilt in it. I let it soak for an hour or so and then wash on gentle cycle. I hang my quilts outside to dry. I can put 7 pairs of mens jeans in this machine and they always come clean. This is the 2nd Kenmore I have had and I loved them both. I had another kind between the two Kenmores and didn't like the other one.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by azwendyg View Post
    I have a Maytag Bravio Top Load high efficiency washer and HATE it! I've had it for a couple of years now and am looking to replace it with a standard "old-style" topload.

    There are several things I do not like about it:

    It does not allow you to soak a load. If you pause the washer when there is water in it, it will automatically drain. Does the same thing if you shut it off when there is water in it.

    You cannot fill the washer first so that you can add detergent/bleach etc. directly to the water and then add the clothes. The bleach dispenser functionality is less than perfect, resulting in bleach spots on some items. If I want to soak a load in bleach before agitating, I fill a bucket, add bleach, add laundry, let soak, then pour the whole thing in the washer and start it. Then the washer proceeds to drain the bleach water off the laundry before starting its wash cycle... ARGH!

    It ties my clothes in knots, literally. When I take out a load of jeans or shirts, I have to spend 5 minutes untangling the legs/sleeves and untwisting them before I can dry them.

    You cannot control the water level or the agitation time. This often results in clothes that are less than clean when the cycle is finished.

    And don't even dream about putting anything delicate in it if you want to see it in one piece again!

    So... Until I replace it, I'm washing my blouses and delicates by hand in the kitchen sink and using the "drain and spin" cycle in the washer before I dry them.

    The fabric softener dispenser "spots" the clothes without fail.

    This is not exactly a leap forward in my laundry routine!
    When I bought my Maytag my primary concern was infinte settings for water loads; temps; types of cycles, etc. And the largest capacity I could possibly get. Got as much selection as was available on any machine at the time. I don't use the bleach dispenser any longer and I do, at times, have issues with the softener dispenser spotting clothes as well. I think a big part of the issues that I have with the machine have more to do with the water we have being very 'hard'. Can't tell you how many kitchen faucets we've replaced over the years due to mineral build up and some of the staining we have on countertops/faucets.

  18. #18
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    I have a Whirlpool Deut front loader and I love. The first load of laundry I did in it I could see that the clothes were cleaner. My water bill is lower every month. I wash my quilts in it and is is pretty gentle. I don't soak things, I don't know it it will do that or not. My DH and DS both have really, really dirty clothes. My DH is a landscaper and my DS is a mechanic. My Dh has had skin cancer so he has to wear long sleeves every day. He wears dress shirts and when he comes home the cuffs and collar are black. I don't pretreat anything and it all comes out clean. He has been wearing the same dress shirts to work in for 2 years and they still look good. You do have to bend over to remove the clothes. That is why they sell the pedestal to put it on. I have gained a lot of counter space in my small laundry room also with the front loader. I would buy one again.

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    I am on my second HE front loader (our first one was first generation and had a fatal flaw that was too expensive to repair). I love it. I am on septic as well and that is one of the reasons that we purchased this type. I feel that clothes come out with less wrinkles and they are lasting and looking new longer than with the conventional type.

    My regular cotton cycle is just under an hour but I do have a speed wash function that goes from 32 minutes up to 36 depending on the soil level it is on. There is also an extra heavy soil level that is an hour and a half. I love it. It also has a sanitizing setting which gets the water super hot. My water is already very hot, I think around 180 degrees so with the sanitizing setting it gets up probably around 212+. I don't use this setting often but once a month I do a load of tea towels, white bathroom towels and then cleaning rags. Or if someone gets a virus-y thing I'll do the towels and sheets on that cycle. Super clean!

    The tub fills partially based on weight. So if I have something that I feel needs extra water I get it wet before I put it in and it sort of tricks the machine into thinking it has a larger, heavier load and fills with more water. Also, I have NEVER had any problems with a rancid smell or mold in my machine because when I am done I leave the door open. 100% of the time. No exceptions. Even when the machine is dry I leave the door open. By doing this I avoid the mildew and I don't have to purchase any tub cleaning products. Every once in awhile before I throw in a load of clean rags I take one and just wipe around the seal and that picks up any lint or dog hair (I have a German Shepherd) that may have collected there. My machine is in the basement and I don't have cats or small animals that could climb in but if I did I would still do the same thing and do a quick check before I put a load of laundry in.

    I do miss being able to process raw wool. However, being on septic I wouldn't have been able to anyway. Also, I have not had any problem with felting wool for applique either. I throw in some tennis balls and a pair of jeans and everything works just fine.

    I have an LG. My choices were somewhat limited because I wanted one that had the controls on the back of the machine like a conventional machine because it matched better with my dryer. A bonus for me is that my toddler can't reach any of the controls. I love my machine. I would and will buy another. If I ever get off of septic I would probably purchase a top loading machine. I really think that you'll like it and the difference in our water and electricity usage has been significant.

  20. #20
    Junior Member elseebee's Avatar
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    I have a top loader HE and love it EXCEPT- I bought it just as I was learning to quilt and did not realize I could not soak quilts in it. I have to use the bathtub for "soaks" and my "spinner/wringer" just ain't as strong as it used to be!

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    I'm knocking on wood every time i do laundry that my old washer hangs in there.
    I have had to replace my stove, fridge and dishwasher and everything is just built so cheaply and so expensive these days. My new dishwashers normal run lasts 2.5 HOURS to wash. the "quick" 1 hour wash doesn't get hot enough to clean the glasses sparkly clean. I hate it. How can something be "energy efficient if its running for 2.5 hours?
    My first washing machine I owned lasted me 18 years...now people are replacing front loaders that really have not been on the market more than a handful of years.....but they are making more money....good for them..AKK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steady Stiching View Post
    My first washing machine I owned lasted me 18 years...now people are replacing front loaders that really have not been on the market more than a handful of years.....but they are making more money....good for them..AKK
    I will say this about the front loaders. Part of the problem is that manufactuers are not making the machines to the same specs as a commercial machine. My father owned coin-op laundries and he talked about this constantly. Also, they have been using front loading washing machines in Europe and other parts of the world for many, many years. I think part of it is the first generation of front loaders they really had not figured out how to scale the mechanics down properly so they took short cuts. My first FL had a tub assembly that was in two pieces joined together. Well, of course, after a certain time, not that long, it began to leak. To replace that part would have been about $2k. The manufacturer would not cover an obvious design flaw. The second one I made sure that assembly was a solid piece. I don't think they make anything for longevity now, which is a shame.

  23. #23
    Super Member JoyjoyMarie's Avatar
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    I have enjoyed reading all these comments about washing machines. I got a used Kenmore out of the want ads in 1972 that lasted me 14 years - who knows how old it was when I bought it. Then I got a top of the line Maytag in 1984, and haven't looked back. It's 28 years old now, knock on wood, and I hope I have it til I die, or move to a tiny place where there's not room for such an old monstrosity. I still love that I can do big or little loads, presoak or no, regular or gentle agitation, any temp water. It has all the adjustments I need, and actually more than I use.

    That being said, I am green with jealousy at my daughter's new dishwasher. It is the quietest, quickest thing ever. and she can even just wash one shelf, if that's all that needs to be done. ( I love that cause my top shelf always fills up faster than the bottom, with just the two of us that's how it works out.) I especially love the quiet aspect because with open living space, the noise of mine is just too much. Since it just drives me nuts, I usually run it in the middle of the night. Hers is the cats meow!
    Last edited by JoyjoyMarie; 06-20-2012 at 08:22 AM. Reason: correct a word
    KEEP CALM and CARRY ON!!

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    I have a HE top loader from Maytag and I HATE IT A LOT. I begged Lowes to take it back but they were rude and laughed. I have dry spots on my clothes and sheets at the end of the cycles and they are not clean and even still have odors in them-----some time but not all the time. I do have the 2 year warrantee but if the tech comes to your home and does not find anything wrong you have to pay for the visit yourself. It is really a rip off because if you have ever had problems with anything electronic you know that it is very common for the problem to happen on again, off again .

  25. #25
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    I have a top loader HE that I love. It's very gentle, as it does not have an agitator. Uses less water, but have been pleased with the way it cleans. I haven t had any problems washing quilts.

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