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Thread: I'm 8 days older than water but never ate collard greens before; how to cook?

  1. #1
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    We grew collards in our garden this yr because I used up all my turnip greens in the freezer over the winter. I just can't last until after frost for fresh turnip greens, so did a substitute plantng to get me through the summer. Never in my life ate collards before--don't know how to cook---but love most greens and they're good for you too. So. Anybody want to give me a good recipe? I'm planning to try them for dinner tonite. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    Same way as you cook turnip greens.

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    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    My Mama sautes them in a pan with a bit of bacon grease and serves with bacon crumbles. I like to add a touch of grated asiago cheese.

    That is how she cooks all greens (poke, mustard and creases), so I would assume you could cook your collard greens pretty much the same way you cook your turnip greens.

  4. #4
    Super Member Lisanne's Avatar
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    I don't cook fresh ones, but I like adding the frozen ones to spaghetti sauce and pouring over pasta. Obviously not a traditional way to make them, but really, this is very good!

  5. #5
    Power Poster blueangel's Avatar
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    Just like you cook turnip greens

  6. #6
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
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    I always cut out the stem down the middle (sometimes they get so big and are tough, but the little veins in the leaves are fine) and cut or tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Rinse the leaves in a colandar in the sink several times. They cook down a LOT, so you probably want to make more than you think you should. I saute a little finely minced garlic in oil in the bottom of a dutch oven or other large cooking pot. If you don't like garlic, cook bacon as someone else mentioned. Or do both! LOL. Add the greens and cover with water. Add a little salt (to taste - you can always check and add more toward the end of cooking time). Bring to a boil and then cut the heat back and let them cook on medium until done. Doneness would be to your liking, but I cook them for at least an hour. Warning: they don't smell so good while they are cooking, but are oh so good when they are done! I apologize if this is in any way vague, but I don't really have a recipe... I just wing it! LOL.

  7. #7
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nance-ell
    I always cut out the stem down the middle (sometimes they get so big and are tough, but the little veins in the leaves are fine) and cut or tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Rinse the leaves in a colandar in the sink several times. They cook down a LOT, so you probably want to make more than you think you should. I saute a little finely minced garlic in oil in the bottom of a dutch oven or other large cooking pot. If you don't like garlic, cook bacon as someone else mentioned. Or do both! LOL. Add the greens and cover with water. Add a little salt (to taste - you can always check and add more toward the end of cooking time). Bring to a boil and then cut the heat back and let them cook on medium until done. Doneness would be to your liking, but I cook them for at least an hour. Warning: they don't smell so good while they are cooking, but are oh so good when they are done! I apologize if this is in any way vague, but I don't really have a recipe... I just wing it! LOL.
    Now, I LOVE the smell of turnip greens cooking!! Makes me get the 'hungries' and a fork to dip and sample. Was just going to wing it --thanks for assuring they're all cooked pretty much the same way.

  8. #8
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Thank you, Lisanne....we love spinach in our pasta, and never thought about using the collards in that way. Will for sure be trying it. Since they're in the garden, and free from now on, I will freeze all I can for next winter.

  9. #9
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mermaid
    Now, I LOVE the smell of turnip greens cooking!! Makes me get the 'hungries' and a fork to dip and sample. Was just going to wing it --thanks for assuring they're all cooked pretty much the same way.
    Hmmm, I wouldn't begin to know how to cook turnip greens... don't like them! ROFL. I like cooked turnip, just not the greens... go figure.

  10. #10
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter
    My Mama sautes them in a pan with a bit of bacon grease and serves with bacon crumbles. I like to add a touch of grated asiago cheese.

    That is how she cooks all greens (poke, mustard and creases), so I would assume you could cook your collard greens pretty much the same way you cook your turnip greens.
    When your mom sautes in pan, does she boil them first? I can vaguely remember my granny doing poke in a skillet---adding eggs in some fashion?, but I think she boiled the poke first. I NEVER ate that either. Maybe that's why I've lived to be 8 days older than water...LOL

  11. #11
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    boy, i'm from the South but have no idea!!

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    poke salet has to be picked when it's very young and then boiled to get all the toxins out (the dark berries on it are poison) It tastes like spinach and is full of vitamins. It's one of the first greens growing after winter, so long ago that was the only fresh vegetables people had before the gardens came in. Did you know green pine needles have more vitamin C then any other food? Sasasfras root will fortify your immune system. My grandmother use to make tea from sassafras roots every spring to 'clean the blood'. In the winter time she made tea from green pine needles when fresh fruit wasn't available. I can't remember a time when any of us kids or family members were sick with the flu or had any illness at all other then a cold now and then. And we were told because we didn't keep our hand clean was why we got a cold.

  13. #13
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Oh my, a step back in time...I always loved sassafras tea--still buy the roots whenever I find it for sale aomewhere...just love the taste of it better than regular tea. I've been told that once poke gets berries, it is poison to eat. Have you ever breaded the stalk in corn meal and fried?? I've tried that--tastes a bit like fish.

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    I liked the sassafras tea! Couldn't drink too many cups or you'd get a nose bleed. I know it takes a long time to cook those collard greens and the smell is pretty bad when they are cooking. They are not a green you can saute in butter and eat just wilted!

  15. #15
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Everybody's been very helpful in responding to my inquiry--and I appreciate the input. My greens are washed and ready to put in the pressure cooker...should do a quick job of tenderizing.

  16. #16
    Junior Member shortstuff's Avatar
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    I cook them like turnip greens add bacon, red pepper flakes, onions, garlic. and if they are bitter add a little sugar. They are better after the frost has hit them in the fall.

  17. #17
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I remember my grandmother saying sassafras will thin the blood. I remember long ago sassafras was thought to clean clogged arteries before the cholesterol meds were available. And funny that's when sassafras was labeled as could cause cancer and many stores stopped selling it. I have a sassafras tree in my back yard. I make the best file (gumbo stuff) by drying the leaves. jThe trees grow fast and make great shade trees.

  18. #18
    Senior Member BeckyL's Avatar
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    We usually didn't eat collards until after the first frost hit them. That sweetened them. Wash, wash, wash, cut out the tough center stem, cut them into shreds, cook in salted water until tender. I learned to use a little butter instead of the fat back I grew up with. Pot likker was served separate.

  19. #19
    Super Member quiltsillysandi's Avatar
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    Nothing better than a big ole bowl of collard greens and cornbread.........You can use hamhocks, or bacon seasoning, that's what us southerners use....Not sure I'd cook collards in a pressure cooker though..:) ..Hope they turn out great for ya!

  20. #20
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    My grandmother use to make tea from sassafras roots every spring to 'clean the blood'. In the winter time she made tea from green pine needles when fresh fruit wasn't available. I can't remember a time when any of us kids or family members were sick with the flu or had any illness at all other then a cold now and then. And we were told because we didn't keep our hand clean was why we got a cold.[/quote]
    ---------------------------
    Are you sure you didn't grow up near me in Milton, WV? That's the same way I was raised. Even after I left to come to CA, my uncle used to pick and send us Sass roots. Then I discovered it can be found in some health food stores..forgot about it lately, have to hunt up more. And as for greens, anything that grew in the garden or fields or woods was fair game for our table.

  21. #21
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramona Byrd
    My grandmother use to make tea from sassafras roots every spring to 'clean the blood'. In the winter time she made tea from green pine needles when fresh fruit wasn't available. I can't remember a time when any of us kids or family members were sick with the flu or had any illness at all other then a cold now and then. And we were told because we didn't keep our hand clean was why we got a cold.
    ---------------------------
    Are you sure you didn't grow up near me in Milton, WV? That's the same way I was raised. Even after I left to come to CA, my uncle used to pick and send us Sass roots. Then I discovered it can be found in some health food stores..forgot about it lately, have to hunt up more. And as for greens, anything that grew in the garden or fields or woods was fair game for our table.[/quote]

    HaHa...never been to Milton, WV..grew tall and skinny right here in Mid TN..way out in the country on 'Nosegay Road'. I did not know that Collards would get better with frost..said before, I've never eaten them! Might not again..LOL...think the pressure cooker REALLY tenderized them (6 minutes). Oh well, learn by doing. The thread about sassafras has reminded me I've not seen it in my country groc in a long time. Don't you love the smell of it?

  22. #22
    Super Member Carrie Jo's Avatar
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    I love collard greens. I also cut the big stem out of the middle and rinse really good and add a onion and ham or ham hock and slowly cook. It usually takes a couple hours. And yes they do shrink down really bad so I cook 3 times what I think we need. Man , I think I will go get some and make them it has been awhile.

  23. #23
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nance-ell
    .... I apologize if this is in any way vague, but I don't really have a recipe... I just wing it! LOL.
    I LIKE the way you cook! Sounds Like a GREAT plan to me!

    Uuummm. I love garlic and bacon.......(and greens)

    CD in Oklahoma

  24. #24
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    Collard greens taste much better after the first frost.
    The are not as strong tasting after being frosted on. If you plan to cook them now I think I would blanch them then freeze before cooking.

    I cook collards a lot in cooler weather. Everyone likes to eat them along with cornbread.

    First thing to do is wash/rinse throughly, cut onto mediun strips (similar to how you would prepare lettuce for salad)
    Place in a large pot, collards will shrink a lot.
    Add enough water to cover about 1/2 of collards.
    Add Salt. I also add about 2 to 3 tablespoons of honey or syrup. Cane Patch syrup is best, a Southern thing.
    My daughter always puts a whole pecan in pot while cooking. Helps the smell.
    I do not add any fat meat or any oil.
    Cook until tender. My family likes them tender but not mushy.
    Adding the syrup is the old southern method.

    Sorry this is so long, but good cooking takes time.

  25. #25
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    I've never cooked Collard greens but I do love Beet greens. You take off the young leaves from the beets and cook them like spinach.

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