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Thread: Your Best Tips or Hints

  1. #1
    NAIROD's Avatar
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    My Quilt Quild is thinking of making a "Non Recipe" Recipe Book for a fund raiser. We would include shortcuts, hints, and best tips from members and friends. If anyone has any they would like to contribute, just post one.

    Here's mine to share with you. For a great portable iron & cutting surface
    to take to classes, I took a TV tray and stapled foam, betting, and muslin and make a great table to use and you don't have to leave your seat at class.

    I store it in an old pillow case and it stays clean and tidy.


  2. #2
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    this wasn't my idea but this inexpensive quilting table is awesome. i made it and love it!


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g14govA4pIM


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAS25...eature=related

  3. #3
    Power Poster
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    This might go in the recipe section:

    one 8x8x2 cake pan is approximately equal to 1/2 a 9x13x2 cake pan
    or two 8x8x2 pans are approximately equal to one 9x13x2 pan

    a 9x9x2 is about 2/3 of a 9x13x2 pan
    or a 9x13x2 is about 1 1/2 times a 9x9x2 pan


  4. #4
    Super Member jbsstrawberry's Avatar
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    The best planned dinner includes reservations :lol:

  5. #5

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    take a tolet paper roll and add a neck string, roll up ready to sew binding and place around your neck it rolls of as you sew no more twisting and bunching when you sew binding on. Not my idea went to a trunk show for Elenor Burns her sister showed us this. It works great.

  6. #6
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    I use a finger cot on my pointer finger when hand quilting, it helps to pull the needle thru the quilt easier. Walmart had 3 differant sizes in one package, or at a pharmacy they have small-medium-large in each package. I can't wait to read more ideas.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Aunt Doggie's Avatar
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    Just read this one the other day...
    Take hard eyeglass case and make a sewing "kit".
    I put my "stork" little sissors in, a few different size buttons, clear thread on a bobbin, a little pack of needles, the tiny strawberry that was on my large pin cusion, some safety pins and tiny container of pins.... It works MARVELOUSLY!!! :D :P
    I have already used it three times since I made mine!!

    Everyone should make one!

  8. #8
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    My Pfaff dealer told me that you can safely use magnet guides next to your presser foot on computerized sewing machines without damaging the computer.

  9. #9
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    Okay - Please tell me what is a "finger cot"???? Thanks. Victoria

  10. #10
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    Hi Victoria - A finger cot is (for lack in better description) like a condom that fits over fingers. If you google it there will be pictures- or put finger cot on the e-bay site. A few years ago someone told be about it at a quilt shop and I have been using the ever since. Hope this helps. Have a nice day.

  11. #11
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    it's sort of like a rubber "glove" that just fits over one finger

  12. #12
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    Junebug -

    Thanks for such a quick reply. I will definitely look them up and get some as I do quite a bit of hand quilting and sometimes my fingers get in the way of the needle.

    Thanks again. Victoria

  13. #13
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    Bearisgray -

    Gottcha! Am definitely getting some of those.

    Thanks, Victoria

  14. #14
    db
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    Here is a non recipe for the recipe book...My husband bought a 4 by 8 sheet of finished plywood. He cut the 8 foot length in half and attached them back together with piano hinges, think he used two or three hinges. When not in use it folds in half which makes it a four by four. I placed it on my kitchen table and covered it up with a table cloth. When I need a long table to put my quilt together I open the sheet of plywood (with the help of my husband) and I now have an 8 foot table. I also use it at the holidays. You can sit 10 to 12 people around the table, so it serves two purposes.
    I does make your kitchen table an inch higher, when the plywood is folded and not in use, but sure comes in handy when I'm putting my quilt together, and at the holidays.
    db

  15. #15
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victoria
    Junebug -

    Thanks for such a quick reply. I will definitely look them up and get some as I do quite a bit of hand quilting and sometimes my fingers get in the way of the needle.

    Thanks again. Victoria
    Finger cots also help hold a thimble on a finger is it's a bit loose.

  16. #16
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
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    Very interesting Klue. I liked the idea of the mug with the feed for sewing those large cones. I have no end of trouble when I get those large reels of thread. i am going to get me one of these.

    Elle

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyspain
    Very interesting Klue. I liked the idea of the mug with the feed for sewing those large cones. I have no end of trouble when I get those large reels of thread. i am going to get me one of these.

    Elle
    that lady is very clever and she always works on a budget which i like because that means more money for fabric :D

  18. #18
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
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    Thats my kinda lady Klue
    :D

    Elle

  19. #19
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I save the selvages cut off of light-color fabrics, and I use them to write the size of strip (especially the length of border pieces) for borders and sashings as I cut them for a project, and tie or pin the selvage piece around the strips for easy recognition when piecing the quilt. Jill

    I save the selvedge strips that I trim off, especially the long ones that I get when cutting borders or backing. Just stuff them into a baggie, and pull out what you need later! Pretty colored ones make great gift ribbons, especially for quilty gifts (sometimes I even cut them a little wider, if I know I want to use them that way). Instead of special bobbin holders, I put a strip of selvedge through the spool hole and bobbin hole, then tie a quick bow. They stay together, and I dont have to try to figure out which bobbin matches the thread I want to use. The more boring strips work as a twine substitute for tying up plants, boxes, etc., even trash bags. Bev

    I keep a tin above my cutting table for selvage edges. Throughout the year, I go to that tin and use the colorful selvage edges for everything. It is much stronger than string, more colorful for tomato plants, and not bothered by the weather. It makes tying up packages fun, and it is using something that would have gone in the trash. Mary

    I found this at 'The Thrifty Quilter'


  20. #20
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
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    Joanne, Thanks for sharing the tip on selveges, I like the idea of tying the bobbin and reel together, thats neat.

    One of our ladies is saving the selvedges to make something, like a pan holder/rest, and I have seen a pattern for a quilt made with selvedges.

  21. #21
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta
    Did you see the dress made with salvedges?
    http://blog.craftzine.com/archive/20...dge_dress.html

    What a cute idea :D

  22. #22
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    It is a slimming style for me...my extra weight would be hidden :wink:

  23. #23
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta
    Did you see the dress made with salvedges?
    http://blog.craftzine.com/archive/20...dge_dress.html

    What a cute idea :D
    Wow that is some dress, wonder how many selvedges it took and how long to save them up :D

  24. #24
    Senior Member Bluphrog's Avatar
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    For the ironing table, you can use the teflon fabric instead of muslin.

    My husband purchased an extendable pointer with a magnet on the end for me from the auto parts store which I keep in my pen/pencil holder. I just extend it and sweep it across the floor to pick up any dropped pins. No bending over looking for pins and no stepping on them with your bare feet.

  25. #25
    pal
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    I use a carpenter's pencil - the flat kind that you have to sharpen with a
    razor blade - when I have to draw on interfacing or freezer paper.

    The wide pencil point doesn't snag the interfacing or put holes in the paper.

    Also, I use a small foam paint brush to erase chalk lines on fabric.

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