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Thread: $1000 machine isn't good?

  1. #1
    Junior Member Cheshire Cat's Avatar
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    Question $1000 machine isn't good?

    So I went to the county fair. There was a sewing shop booth there. They had a lot of nice machines. I am on my third. My first was a cheaper Brother. Work for a short while. My second was a Pfaff, only $200 but for me that was a lot. My third is a Singer Quilter's confidence. I paid just under $300. It lacks power over seams but solid for all the basics.

    I'm expecting a little money so I asked them what is the best machine I can get for $1000. They show me a nice computerize Husqvarna. Pretty red details. I've played with Janomes as well. The features include decorative stitches not very different from my Singer but less variety, footless control and an automatic presser foot; lowers and raises itself. Nice features but this is the only real difference. She tells me that $1000 really won't get me a good machine. That $4000 is really what I should shoot for.

    I'm thinking for a $1000 I should get enough power to slide over pinwheels and prairie points, the push button cut, more stitches, and footless control.

    I sew about 8 to 10 quilts a year on my little Singer. It groans some over the thicker seams but I get them through. I make throw to queen size mostly. I have machine quilted a few but prefer to have them professionally quilted. Am I asking for too much for my $1000? Really?
    "The desire to create is one of the deepest yearnings of the human soul. No matter our talents, education, backgrounds, or abilities, we each have an inherent wish to create something that did not exist before." ~Dieter F. Uchtdor

  2. #2
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    I feel your pain.

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    You should ask your dealer about gently used machines. You may get more on your wish list.

  4. #4
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    No,not really. You can get a nice machine for under $1000. the best machine for you is the one that will meet your needs. some machines have more bells and whistles but you don't have to have them to do nice work.

  5. #5
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheshire Cat View Post
    So I went to the county fair. There was a sewing shop booth there. They had a lot of nice machines. I am on my third. My first was a cheaper Brother. Work for a short while. My second was a Pfaff, only $200 but for me that was a lot. My third is a Singer Quilter's confidence. I paid just under $300. It lacks power over seams but solid for all the basics.

    I'm expecting a little money so I asked them what is the best machine I can get for $1000. They show me a nice computerize Husqvarna. Pretty red details. I've played with Janomes as well. The features include decorative stitches not very different from my Singer but less variety, footless control and an automatic presser foot; lowers and raises itself. Nice features but this is the only real difference. She tells me that $1000 really won't get me a good machine. That $4000 is really what I should shoot for.
    Yeah, and make sure you buy it from HER! Seriously, you should be able to find a wonderful machine, for $1000.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  6. #6
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    I was in your situation needing a more 'heavy duty' machine. My dealer first asked me what features where high priority and what I was willing to spend. She demo'd an Elna and it has been the perfect machine for me. I suggest you find another dealer that can help you find a machine that works for both you and your budget. BTW, I think you should be able to find a nice machine for $1000 Good luck!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Skyangel's Avatar
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    You may want to consider getting a vintage metal machine for piecing and going over those seams. Keep your Singer for those decorative stitches and extra features. A vintage Singer 401 or even a straight-stitch-only 201 would have all the power you would need for heavier piecing. And at a lot less than $1000 to buy it and have it completely refurbished.

  8. #8
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    There is no need to spend $4000 on a machine. I had a $3000 Bernina that I actaully sold because it had so many features I did not need or use. I sold it and bought a Bernina that cost only $700 and it serves my purpose well. My main features that I amke sure I have are: Needle Up/Needle down, authomatic needle threader, being able to move the needle to the left or to the right so I can position it where I want it, and I like a machine that works good with the walking foot. All the other feathers are useless to me and when you are buying a $4000 machine, you are paying for all those other feathers that you may not use, so make sure to look at the $1000 machines and get one of those if it has all the features you feel you need. Good luck and do not feel bad about only spending $1000 on a mcahine. There's alot of really nice machines, in all brands, available to buy for $1000 or less.
    Last edited by aborning; 09-05-2012 at 03:17 PM.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Cheshire Cat's Avatar
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    I have an antique Singer 201 that my uncle gave me. I have never used it. I guess because I think of it as an antique rather than a working machine. I should give it a try. Thanks ladies for your encouragement.
    "The desire to create is one of the deepest yearnings of the human soul. No matter our talents, education, backgrounds, or abilities, we each have an inherent wish to create something that did not exist before." ~Dieter F. Uchtdor

  10. #10
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    The Singer 201 is ***the*** vintage Singer to have for quilting! It's a workhorse of a machine and highly desirable among collectors and quilters. Parts are still available for it, and it's an easy machine to maintain and repair. Lucky you!!!

  11. #11
    Junior Member Xtgirl's Avatar
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    I was going to suggest using a vintage machine as they are tough,simple and in most cases heavy duty. The 201 or the 301 I think would work great. The only issue is if you want fancier newer features. I think for 1000 you should definitely get something that will suit your needs. You may get more bang for your buck buying used however. I bought a bernina 440qe from a fellow quilter for a great price, so that could be another way to go.
    The Potomac Quilter
    Innova 26 with Lightning Stitch and Autopilot

  12. #12
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    Malarky. All you need is a machine that will sew the way you want. People were doing extreme stuff - embroidery, lace on the first electric singers! If you sew everything besides quilting, get a good machine that will sew everything from jeans to silk. There are featherweight users that will use nothing else for quilting, and by today's standards, the featherweight is primitive. (It's mechanical rather than electronic)

    I've demoed cutwork, couching, pintucks, cording, and some freemotion embroidery on a plain zig-zag only mechanical machine. If you go back to the Pfaff, some of the lower priced models have IDT which works well. You use that instead of a walking foot. The one advantage to the IDT, is that most feet work with it. I can use the SID foot, 1/4 inch foot, open toe, you name it. Some disagree, but I prefer an vertical bobbin. I've used the 2144 Pfaff for those templates for borders. Used triple stitch and kept the IDT down.
    Those that really like walking feet can make a case for those. You will need to find whatever suits you best.

  13. #13
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    When we started looking for an embroidery machine for my sewing room. We made the mistake of going to a sewing center shop (the ones who sell machines not like a LQS) She kept steering us to the 3000 dollar Babylocks. I told her my budget was under a grand. She looked as if I threw a bucket of water on her and was melting. We left, I went online and ordered my PE770 by Brother.
    I have a Brother SQ9000 that does what I want, has lots of stitches etc. Then my Janome 11543 is the machine I go to for the mean stuff like denim and thick seams. The Janome will sew a quilt top and FMQ it also.

    Do some more research online and take those sales people hogwash with a grain of salt.
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  14. #14
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    You can get some nice machines for around $1000 -- I would suggest looking at Janomes or Elnas if you want a newer machine. I too would suggest you go to a different shop.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  15. #15
    Junior Member neenee586's Avatar
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    Here is a nice article on your "gem" 201. Dig her out, clean her up and give her a go!
    http://www.sewalot.com/singer_201k_sewalot.htm

  16. #16
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    Check out www.allbrands.com. I bought all of my machines from them and love them all. They offer many brands, have free shipping and super fast delivery. Good luck. It is fun doing the research!
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

  17. #17
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    Have you considered getting a machine like the Juki 2010, Brother 1500 or the Janome 6600? All of those are 9" throated machines. They only do straight stitches but they're solid machines and piece and quilt really nicely I'm looking in to getting one of those for myself. I'm leaning towards the Juki but I haven't decided yet...

  18. #18
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    Use your Singer 201. You'll be amazed at the power, speed and size of the harp. I got mine as a Freebie and it sews rings around my Janome 6500 which cost me $2000. I got the 201 to mend DH's coveralls as the Janome moaned, groaned and skipped when I tried to stitch through heavy duc. Now I find the 201 stitches more evenly than the Janome, doesn"t jump at seam intersections and I can stuff a queen sized quilt through it for machine quilting as the feed dogs drop (knob is underneath the machine). You don't need to spend more money. I'd also check Craig's List (Kijiji in Canada) as you can sometimes get very good deals. That's how I got my 201.
    Shelbie from the High County in Southern Ontario

  19. #19
    Senior Member booklady's Avatar
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    Went to an auction last night. Pfaff 7592 (?) sewing/embroidery machine went for $600. I saw them on ebay for upwards of $1500! My point is . . . look around, a used one may be the way to go. I bought a Husvarna Viking for $35 at an auction. Found the receipt in the inst book. $325 retail! Took it back to the same shop for a tuneup and have a great working machine. My Pfaff 79 is over 40 years old and I'm afraid it's on its last legs so I wanted a backup. Look at Craigslist as well. Won't cost anything to look! Good luck.

  20. #20
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    The viking sapphire is a nice machine. You can get the lower end model for under $1000. It's got a 9" throat area, which is great for quilting. Lots of decorative stitches. I have the 830, which is the previous model and I love it.

  21. #21
    Senior Member QuiltMania's Avatar
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    You need a new dealer. DH got me a brand new Janome Memory Craft 6600 a couple of years ago for $1000. It had the knee lift lever and a whole box of feet with it. Sounds like your dealer is just trying to make a huge commission.

  22. #22
    Senior Member cizzors's Avatar
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    Get the Brother 1500. It will sew up to 10 layers at a time. I've only done 7 so far but never faulted through them. Large throat with push button cutter. It's a heavy duty with no bells or whistles staight stitch for $600.00. You won't be disappointed, promise.
    Never outsmart your common sense.

    Karen

  23. #23
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Seriously .. you really do not need tp spend $4,000 for a machine ...to do the basics and can handle thick fabric. Do take some sample layers to test drive anything you are considering purchasing.

  24. #24
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have two straight stitch only machines, my Daughter has one too. All were under 1000.00. That Lady just wants to get more commission. All three machines have 9" throats and all make a beautiful stitch and quilt very nicely. The more you want the more they cost. Google and see what you can find and go from there. Don't forget to replace the needle with every quilt. I save those for piecing.
    Another Phyllis
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  25. #25
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    1000 should be able to get you a nice solid machine they have plenty of nice high end juki, brother, babylocks, janomes, etc in that price range. Just write down all your must have features in a machine, and ask them to show you models in that price range. I know that the juki exceed f-600 should be in your price range and the jukis should be able to handle thick seams and runs about 900, some straight stitch only machines are also in your price range like the brother PQ1500S if you don't need one for decorative stitching that is more heavy duty, but again you need to really sit down and figure out what you want in a machine and do your research because that person is just trying to get money out of you. I paid 1800 for mine and I love my machine and you definitely don't need 4000 dollars

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