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Thread: Advice for recreating a heavy tied old fashion style quilt

  1. #26
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    I repaired a tied scrappy quilt for my then boyfriend (husband now) that was made by his grandmother. Poor woman really couldn't sew, but she made it out of love. It had not one but two wool blankets used as batting. Heaviest darn thing I've ever worked on. He still loves it...we use it when the electric goes out in the winter.

  2. #27
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    My very first quilt was made when I was in my teens (45 years ago - yikes). I cut triangles using leftover fabric from sewing projects ( my mom and I both sewed clothes). Cut them all using a cardboard template into triangles, then sewed them together. Anyway when it became quite worn, I covered it with new fabric and this old remade quilt is still on our bed and going strong. As far as I'm concerned, do what works for you.
    Last edited by Karamarie; 04-19-2017 at 04:22 AM. Reason: Error

  3. #28
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    I think I would use denim and flannel as the squares.

  4. #29
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
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    If a sheet is added to the back, it will be more washable and yet still heavy?

  5. #30
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    I think the best way to keep it affordable will be to find an already made quilt top. Maybe a vintage unfinished top. This way I would save on piecing time, and only charge for the batting, backing material and time for finishing. How about a vintage polyester top? Those are cheap, durable and colorful.

  6. #31
    Member ssucf's Avatar
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    My mother made tied quilts all the time. She just used any kind of material. Wool, cotton anything available. Once she formed the top she would use a sheet for the back and put a wool blanket for the batting. She then tied it with crochet thread or some sort of heavy thread other than sewing thread randomly. Not sure how close she tied it but it held together for many years. They were very warm and lasted a very long time. I sure wish I had one of her quilts that she had done.

  7. #32
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    You may want to check his definition of "heavy" too. I decided the Bargello I was sleeping under last night is too heavy for right now. And it is just a regular Warm and Natural batting.....

    Dina

  8. #33
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    Profannie, that quilt looks just like the ones my mother and grandmothers made. If I were doing it I would go to Goodwill and look for men's shirts for fabric. When DH had open heart surgery I bought some really nice shirts at Gw for $2.50 each on senior day, size 2x. Lots of fabric in them. I would not use wool blankets for batting as the quilt may get washed in hot water and that would be disastrous. Fleece blankets would work well for batting. If you use polyester batting remember that the ties need to be about 4" apart.
    Shirley in Arizona

  9. #34
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    If one gets a wool blanket that has already been shrunk -

  10. #35
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    Remember this guy is requesting a quilt from a childhood memory. A "normal" quilt made from flannel, front and back, with a cotton batting will be heavy enough for what he is wanting. His grandmother probably did not make a quilt, quilt it, and then add another top, etc. I doubt a wholecloth, tied, is what he is thinking about either. Hope to see what you come up with.

    Ellen

  11. #36
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    We never washed our quilts. When the top/outside started to look bad, the quilt was taken apart. The outsides were washed and repaired and maybe replaced. The wool inside held up better if it was encased in cheese cloth. If not, it may have needed to be re-carded. I don't know if there are woolen mills around anymore that do that. Ours closed about 20 years ago.

    Wool is a natural fiber and does not hold bad smells. A few hours on the clothes line refreshed it. Overnight was even better, if you trusted the weather.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  12. #37
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    Perfect quilt for a guy. They don't want all those flowery things--lol.

  13. #38
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    I don't think you can go wrong with old army blankets. They have been washed more than once and boy, are they warm. With 3 brothers in the Navy, we had a good assortment of blankets which my frugal mother used to make quilts.
    They were tied also and were heavy also. I remember that it was difficult to turn over under such a quilt but I also remember how warm they were. (in my 80's now, so that was a long time ago.

  14. #39
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pennyhal View Post
    Do you have a photo of the old quilt? Does he remember the type, or color, or theme of the old quilt? I have visions of recreating a quilt made by my great aunt, but am never satisfied with the fabric I see. Sometime I think some things survive better just as memories.
    Just wanted to add, if the old tied quilt had what looked like little knobs of yarn holding it together, it was probably tied using wool yarn. That was the only option years ago. Also, using two sheets instead of batting makes a nice weighted feeling like the old quilts my grandma had. You can even do the quilt with the birthing method or blanket stitches with the yarn. If you use the wool yarn around the edges, be sure to do it real loosely so when it is washed, it will shrink to fit.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  15. #40
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    I made my son a quilt using 2 thrift store sheets for the batting, as I was replicating his worn out quilt my mother and grandmother had made together that he had been using since he was in his teens. The original quilt had heavy muslin feed sacks and a sheet for batting and was fairly heavy. He loved that feeling of weight so I used the sheets to match what he had before. It came out almost the same as the original in weight and feel.
    Linda Wedge White

    I believe UFOs are like scraps, ferns and dust bunnies. Once you get two, they send spores out into the air and more just happen anywhere the spores meet.

  16. #41
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    If he wants it heavy just use two layers of batting!

  17. #42
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    Ah, thank you for defining 'quilt' for me. The one you are talking about was what kept me toasty in a 100+ year old family home on the edge of Lake Michigan.

    Now about those wool blankets. I have a pile and intend to use them for "batting". The grandmother whose house they came from was a washaholic. If she could get her hands on it, it got washed. Including those woolen blankets. So, does wool have a point at which it ceases to shrink? I am absolutely sure these blankets would be safe to use but now I am also wondering. Your and others experiences are important to me. You may well save me. Thank you in advance.

    And for a giggle, a silly but true story. I am a rather swarthy soul and my child's knees were always disreputable because of my tan skin color and the tan I could accrue playing in the yard and the dirt I could get into. Bless my grandmother, she would use Ajax and a heavy wash cloth on my knees, etc. It never did did a whole lot of good except to make my knees pink from the scrubbing. And make me shy of bath time.

    ;-) Alvie

  18. #43
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    Alvie, what a fun story....she scrubbed YOU up too! ��

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    I have a really heavy, old tied quilt that my neighbor gave me. It's made with polyester double knits in 6" squares, poly batting and a sheet for the backing. It's kinda ugly but I love it in the winter.

    Cari
    This is what came to my mind, too. If it is one his grandmother made, it was probably during the era of the double knits. Those were wonderful!--easy care and they wore like iron. As many have suggested, look at the thrift stores and, summer is coming, try garage sales, looking for double knits. I suspicion what this fellow remembers is double knit fabric, not cotton.

  20. #45
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    Actually using the scrap pieces from a Tshirt quilt would make a heavy quilt. If he doesn't have any, you can buy sacks of Tshirts from thrift shops. Some are very colorful, too. I like the idea of tacking with your machine so you don't have to pull the yarn thru the heavy layers.

  21. #46
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    Many quilts were made made of different colors of polyester which made them very heavy. You might want to ask him about it. Sometimes they did not use batting because of the weight of the polyester. ( double knits ) I do not know what state you are in and your climate. I have seem them done both ways. With batting in them and without. I have several tied quilts and they are beautiful. The one thing I noticed is the quilter would tie it with a yarn that matched the quilt. Some of them used rug yarn as it was more durable and some used regular yarn. I myself would not use cordory. I can send you pictures of quilts from double knits. Just pm me. Good luck.
    Last edited by Carol Jean; 04-20-2017 at 05:25 AM.

  22. #47
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    My Grandmother on my Dad's side made quilts for as long as I can remember, As a kid I too remember those heavy
    tied quilts... She would sample piece the tops using what ever fabric she had at hand, whether it was cotton, silk or double knit. Inside batting and the back would be done with old draperies. It didn't matter what the pattern would be on top, she used what was at hand, even her kids clothing when they were young. So my suggestion would be drapery, but maybe use todays drapery, Today I still have 3 tops she made that are yet to be sandwiched, and I too will be tying them. She was 94 yrs when she passed back in 1993. I also have acouple of single quilts my boys used on their bunk beds, yet well worn. One is Grandmothers Fan.

  23. #48
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    If using corduroy you might want to pink the edges first or use a larger seam. My sister made a charm quilt with it, and even after having it machine quilted, some of the seams started to shred after only a little use.

  24. #49
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    If using sheets for either backing or on the inside, tying will not be much fun. The thread count is too tight to allow for ease in pulling the needle through, especially if using a thread or yarn that is a bit thick. My mother's Lutheran World Relief quilting group almost always used sheets for backing and frequently used them inside the quilts. The ladies always had sore fingers and hands (even when using pliers) and loved it when regular batting and normal quilting fabric happened to be used.

  25. #50
    Member ssucf's Avatar
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    Very well could shrink. Since we used a wringer washer and the good clothes got washed first the water was cooled down. Then everything was hung on a clothes line. LOL After we got a washer and dryer, she still hung them out to dry.

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