Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3
Results 51 to 66 of 66

Thread: Been quilting long enough to know how....but don't.

  1. #51
    Junior Member Christine George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee WI
    Posts
    175
    I'm with SueSew. If I use a narrow foot the fabric wants to go down in between the feed dogs. I use one of my wider feet and move the needle over for 1/4 inch from the side of the foot. Works great.

  2. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Spokane, Washington
    Posts
    344
    If this does happen and there is a "bump" on the back of the quilt where it goes one way above the bump and the other way below the bump, you can clip the seam allowance perpendicular to the seam and then press the seam on either side of the clip the way it will lay flat. Just be sure you don't clip into the seam itself. I often have to do this, when I've either pressed in the wrong direction or where there are lots of seams to match. It helps to make the whole quilt top lay nice and flat. It also helps, as bigsister said, to use a wider presser foot.

  3. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    729
    I just snip it too no one has ever complained about my quilts and i have gave a lot of them away

  4. #54
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    1,003
    Sounds like a lot of you are like me--try to do it right but if it acts up I just accept it.

  5. #55
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,449
    Blog Entries
    15
    Guess I must be a bit anal. Like Tartan I'll clip a few stitches and lay the seam allowance flat. Luckily it doesn't happen too often. If I have one I think will twist I stop just before I reach it, lift the presser foot (needle down) and check it is laying the right way then continue.

  6. #56
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    22,999
    When I've had to clip - I clip each side of the seam separately - so that the seam is less weakened in just that one spot - and then I apply Fray Check to the spot - (or similar product) - I feel that doing so will minimize any fraying

    Twisted seams really bother me, too. I usually try to fix them when I find them during that "final press" before it gets layered. I just remove the few stitches that are holding it and resew the area -

    I have finally learned to use a stiletto (or stiletto type object - a toothpick, tips of small scissors, a nail file, a screwdriver, a needle, a straight pin - whatever) to make sure the seam is still going the way I want it to right before it gets to the needle.

    That little 'bump' on the sewing machine does cause the seam to flip -

    I also learned from my Mom that the back side should look good, too. Mom - she would frequently look at the back side of a piece of needlework before looking at the front side.

    I find that finger-pressing (or finger-nail pressing) usually is adequate for the first seam. I usually do the nesting or butting approach when joining seams. Usually they butt up tightly enough together so i don't need to pin.

    If it's a really tricky join - like the halves of a LeMoyne star - I will hand baste the intersection to hold the pieces -
    Last edited by bearisgray; 04-28-2012 at 06:13 AM.

  7. #57
    Super Member Helen S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Vancouver, Washington State
    Posts
    2,111
    I find pressing the seams seems to help, but I keep a finger on the seam to the left of the feed dog and presser foot, keeping the seam flat as it comes up to the needle. It takes an extra second or two, but well worth the effort in the finished look, I think.

  8. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    859
    Maybe you need to reduce your presser foot pressure.

  9. #59
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Littlefield, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,094
    Even if the seam lies flat when pressed, it makes it hard on the person who quilts the top. What I do when I get a customer who has a top with seams like that...I do myself a favor and check the back, making sure the seams all go in one direction, if they flip, I snip...right next to the end of the block/section where the seam is sewn down...I snip and flip the one end to match the other end. This makes stitch in the ditch to secure blocks much easier. I also do this when doing e2e (panto) designs...it helps settle thick seams. Extra time for me? Loss of pay for time? Yep...but, I don't have to fight the quilt on the frame. I also flatten thick seams (like in pinwheel blocks..where the points join).
    Did you know that if you turn a seam in one direction, and the front join is off a tiny bit...you can try flipping the seam in a different direction, and that can make the front join match better? If the amount you are off is just a couple of threads off, it can make that join look perfect. Another reason to keep the seams going in same direction...where they flip on the back..changes the seam placement on the front...if the flip is at the middle of the seam...you will se a "jog" where the flip is, even if it is flat. This becomes really visable if the quilter tries to secure with SID (stitch in the ditch)..he/she has to jog over to stay in the ditch.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot V3 automated quilter
    https://www.facebook.com/campbellsquiltingbymarge

  10. #60
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    22,999
    Marge -

    Thank you for adding that a twisted seam WILL show up as a lump when quilting

  11. #61
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fayetteville, GA
    Posts
    2,881
    Blog Entries
    1
    The twisted or bump in the seam bothers me. I pin, I try to sew with the seams facing the feed dogs on top, but not every seam works that way. When I'm coming to the throat plate I gently lift the seam the tinest bit and that keeps the seam from bumping the wrong way. I do snip a few stitches if it doesn't lay right. I am not a perfectionist, but a few things bother me and that's one of them.
    We would worry less about what others think of us if we realized how seldom they do.

  12. #62
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Duluth MN
    Posts
    380
    Margecam52, thanks. Your knowledge is so helpful to me as I'm just learning to quilt. I appreciate your tips so much.

  13. #63
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    362
    Blog Entries
    3
    Mine do too. I've been at it over 30 years. Glue I guess????
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  14. #64
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,140
    What I mean about seam position is that the top seam should lay pointing up so seam will feed into the foot and you can make sure that it feeds correctly and the bottom seam should be pointing down so that it will go smoothly over the feed dogs and not twist. This method also alows the seams to seat/match the seams together better and cuts down on twisting.own on.

  15. #65
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    177
    Very useful info...

  16. #66
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    mesa, arizona
    Posts
    416
    had my dealer check the timing of my feed dogs when in for service. that problem is cured. don't know how it happens but apparently they can get out of sync.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.