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Thread: Can you quilt on Faux Silk?

  1. #1
    Senior Member taiboo's Avatar
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    I saw some REALLY awesome colors today and immediatly thought of a zipper quilt, but when i saw faux silk...I immediately got afraid and walked away...


    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    Personally, if it is fabric, I quilt with it. Some more carefully than others.

  3. #3
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    What is faux silk? I've hand quilted on silk, but have never heard of faux silk.

  4. #4
    Senior Member taiboo's Avatar
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    NO idea, but the colors caught my eye today so i immediately went to it. It was at walmart.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    What is faux silk? I've hand quilted on silk, but have never heard of faux silk.

  5. #5
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    It is literally, fake silk.

  6. #6
    Senior Member taiboo's Avatar
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    Does that mean you can quilt with it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Maride
    It is literally, fake silk.

  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maride
    It is literally, fake silk.
    :-D I know that, Maride (je parle français). I meant what is it made of.

  8. #8
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    If it's slick I don't use it but I know that people have. Get the smallest piece that they will allow 1/8 or 1/4 yd, take it home and try it. Some of the slick shiny fabrics show every stitch, satin is really bad about that, but my aunt did a king size quilt completely hand embroidered with cream satin. It was phenomenal and appraised at $7000.

  9. #9
    Super Member kwhite's Avatar
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    You can do it. It may not be the easiest thing to work with. I agree try a small practice doll quilt size to see if you are going to be able to work with it. You may want to increase the seam size as this may fray more then you are used to.

  10. #10
    Power Poster littlehud's Avatar
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    I'm not sure I would like working with it. To each their own.

  11. #11
    Junior Member Qbird's Avatar
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    Is your Aunt's name Kathy G.? lives in Illinois and uses silk ribbon a lot. a true artist. I am using silks and satins on my Jenny Haskin Quilt and it is quilting fine, (but do have it stabilized with fusible batting)

  12. #12
    Super Member hobo2000's Avatar
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    A longarmer can quilt anything you can put on the frame. Well, not husbands. Doesn't always look the greatest. I did a 2 sided poly fleece quilt for a lady. She loved it, it wasn't bad the design showed up beautifully. She has it on her bed and it looks great. Faux silk you would use a fine needle and wool or silk batting and a comparable material on the back. Due to fraying, I would keep the design faurly simple and larger blocks and lots of no-fray.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by taiboo
    I saw some REALLY awesome colors today and immediatly thought of a zipper quilt, but when i saw faux silk...I immediately got afraid and walked away...


    Thoughts?
    Many years ago, I bought a batch of cotton fabrics in a bankruptcy. Naturally, there were some stray fabrics, which are not cotton, among them some faux silk. I have three workable pieces (about 4 yards altogether.

    Since I am not good enough a seamstress and not interested in working with the material, I would be happy to give it to you.

    You can then let us all know whether it worked for you.

    BTW, it does not fray.

  14. #14
    Junior Member Qbird's Avatar
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    If you can not find anyone else that would use the faux silk I would be glad to pay the shipping and think I can use it to embroider on, in a quilt. the biggest problem would be if it would launder, but could try prewashing it before using it.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qbird
    If you can not find anyone else that would use the faux silk I would be glad to pay the shipping and think I can use it to embroider on, in a quilt. the biggest problem would be if it would launder, but could try prewashing it before using it.
    Sure thing.
    While I wait for tailbo to respond, I will put it in the wash (I have had it for a few years). We'll see what happens. I think I laundered all the materials after I first got them. So that should not be a problem.

  16. #16
    Junior Member Qbird's Avatar
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    Gosh I didn't mean for you to have to wash it, I thought that's what should be done before anyone puts it in a quilt, unless they are going to dry clean the quilt, I would suspect though that faux silk is polyester based, but surprized you say it does not fry, they usually do so need backing or stay stitching as that kind of fabric tends to go wonky sometime.

  17. #17
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    I've never used faux silk, but I have made and quilted a real silk quilt ( 2 actually ). I did have to use a very light weight fusable interfacing on some of the silk though. It does fray easily without it. Hope this helps.

  18. #18
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    I am making a silk quilt for my Granddaughter and the fraying is really a pain! If the silk is off grain it frays really bad so I decided to use heavy starch and it worked pretty good to keep it from fraying much. I then zig zag or surge around each block and then sew it together. I just have to hand rinse the starch out with a light soap and air dry the fabric do not ring the fabric. I also found out that make sure your iron is on a low setting as the heat will distort the silk fabric.

  19. #19
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    I quilted wiht it and here is pics to prove it I made the gold faux silk and made it into a whole cloth quilting design on it. Stuart http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-54373-1.htm

  20. #20
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    I spoke with a company when I was at the Houston International show a couple of years ago about the silk interfacing. That's when I bought this very light weight interfacing and it irons on easily and holds the fabric well without changing the hand of the fabric. No fraying with it. Great stuff for silk.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qbird
    Gosh I didn't mean for you to have to wash it, I thought that's what should be done before anyone puts it in a quilt, unless they are going to dry clean the quilt, I would suspect though that faux silk is polyester based, but surprized you say it does not fry, they usually do so need backing or stay stitching as that kind of fabric tends to go wonky sometime.
    That's OK. It's in the wash already.

    If tailboo does not tell me that he/she wants the material I will be happy to send it to you. I'll let you know by Monday morning.

    PS: About the fraying: It does not fray more than some of the cheaper brands of cotton. You'll see. You may have to use some sizing or starch to work with it. It does have the slight natural roughness of silk. The color hues are on the medium - dark side.

  22. #22
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    is that like cotton lame'?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan
    is that like cotton lame'?
    I am still a greenhorn who does not know what cotton lame' is :oops:
    I am learning a lot from all you nice people here on the board :thumbup:

  24. #24
    Junior Member Qbird's Avatar
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    If it washes nice you should really try it before giving it away, get some light weight fusible either batting or just a iron on stabilizer and make a square, even if it is a 4 patch, you might be surprized and like it. might make a nice table runner or something xmasy, depending on what color you have. wow lame, that is a word I haven't heard in years and have forgotten what it feels like, soft I bet.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qbird
    If it washes nice you should really try it before giving it away, get some light weight fusible either batting or just a iron on stabilizer and make a square, even if it is a 4 patch, you might be surprized and like it. might make a nice table runner or something xmasy, depending on what color you have. wow lame, that is a word I haven't heard in years and have forgotten what it feels like, soft I bet.
    There is far too much material for a table runner. I cannot wear or sleep under synthetic materials. Even though I am not allergic to it, my skin gets dry and very scratchy from it. Since this is somewhat unusual material, whoever does something with it needs all the material available. Who knows what it matches up with.

    It's very much OK with me when it goes to somebody who can do something nice with it. (Like most quilters, I am not a hoarder, I just like to have the right materials on hand. All else can go to good use.)

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