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Thread: Fusible applique - how to not fray the ends?

  1. #51
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
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    I have to agree with MadQuillter... stabilizer works for me. I use an old sheet cut to the size of the block and leave it on afterwards. Adds stability for quilting later too.
    '

  2. #52
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    I use steam a seam all the time. Change the size of your needle and your stitches may be too tight. Most important thing of all is to sew with your plate on a single hole for straight stitching only! Don't give up . Use some practice pieces till it comes out ok. Roz

  3. #53
    Super Member cr12cats's Avatar
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    I use E. Burns method like pieces does no problems and use a blanket stitch around the edges.

  4. #54
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    I was going to jump in but all these lovely quilters touched on all my answers. Good luck.

  5. #55
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    I agree the needle should fall just on the outside of the fabric. If I use a zigzag, I go around once with a loser and just a tad smaller. Then I adjust to the size I want and tighten up the stictch some, and that has made it easier for me. I do use a tear away stablizer also. I read this somewhere several years ago when I was doing an ABC book and it really helped me.

  6. #56
    Super Member cbridges22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galvestonangel
    I agree the needle should fall just on the outside of the fabric. If I use a zigzag, I go around once with a loser and just a tad smaller. Then I adjust to the size I want and tighten up the stictch some, and that has made it easier for me. I do use a tear away stablizer also. I read this somewhere several years ago when I was doing an ABC book and it really helped me.
    What is stabilizer and what does it do?

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by LucyInTheSky
    Quote Originally Posted by jayelee
    I was taught to sew with the right side of the stitch just off the edge of the fabric I don't know if that helps but I use heat and bond light and dont have this problem
    Making sure I have this right - the majority of your stitching is on the applique with only a little on the background, correct?
    When I sew the applique, my straight stitch is in the background fabric- very close to the applique piece. The little bite then swings to the left into the applique and then the needle swings back to the background fabic for a few stitches.

    Also, is the fabric you are using for the applique tightly woven? Have you considered doing a practice block with a batik? I'm sure that one would not fray! : = )

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by pieces
    I use E. Burns method in her Sunbonnet Sue Book.
    Trace the pattern on the fusible.
    Sew the fusible onto the fabric piece.
    Cut a slit in the fusible, turn, and finger press. Iron in position on your quilt block. Stitch around the applique piece with the buttonhole stitch. Works great and no frayed edges because the edges are in a seam. :thumbup:
    Got a dumb question for you......
    What is the brand of the "non-woven fusible" you use? There are SOOOO many types and choices that I sometimes wish Eleanor would package her own brand so I could get just what she's using! HA! The one I see Eleanor using doesn't appear to have a paper backing so I guess the fusible material is only on one side. HELP

    :!: :shock: :oops:

  9. #59
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    I just appliqued a butterfly quilt and used wonder under. No frayed edges. also used a stitch that looked like a straight stitch with an x over it. I don't know what it's called, but it worked well. I used a size 16 needle since I quilted as I went.

  10. #60

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    I don't know much of anything about appliqué, and am currently working on my first fusible project. I'm using the double sided paper backed Pellon product. I haven't gotten to the part of stitching it down yet, but am reading all the hints with great interest and hoping it saves me from some mess-ups :) Thank you all for those!

    On the fraying, is it possible when fusing, the edges aren't getting totally fused down? Or not fused well enough? I'm just wondering if that could contribute to the fraying. Or, perhaps even the fabric weave? (But then again, what do I know????)

    Just a thought :)
    Debbie in Austin

  11. #61
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    Try anew needle and do not do a satianst to begin it is a harder one to tackle... a Button hole st is the one I perfer the best but I also use all kins of fancy stitches also...

  12. #62
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    Sometimes I use a finner needle and sometimes a topst needle for blanket st for I like ti use two threads at once so it really shows and look hand stitched.

  13. #63

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    A cheaper, loosley woven fabric is going to have a tendancy to fray more than a good quality, tight woven fabric. Fabric choice is important when doing applique.

  14. #64
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
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    I did an entire quilt applique using flannels a couple of years ago. Not sure what needle I used, but I did use Steam a Seam Lite 2. I used the blanket stitch and didn't have any problems. I did use a new needle. It was a baby quilt. I recently saw the quilt after many, many uses and washes and it still looks GREAT! I was actually surprised. I worried and fretted over it the whole time I was making it, but apparently all worry was for not. The quilt is holding up very well. Oh, and I didn't have any problems with fraying along the edges.

    Someone suggested using starch. I don't recommend this because the starch will keep the Steam a Seam from fusing properly to one or the other or both your applique piece or the background. This is my experience so just my opinion. Maybe others have had other experiences. Good luck!

    I was going to attach a photo, but I can't find it, Oh Well.

  15. #65
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    Am going to say smaller sharp needle.. not universal, not ballpointed, but sharp. (presuming your cottons are WOVEN cotton fabrics. And a small size... like size 11 or better yet size 9. adding fusible to the back first wouild help too. Fray check painted along the line and allowe to dry would help hold that spot together, there is a newer product from the company that makes fraycheck I think... that is softer and still holds loose threads together. I can see having some problem in some spots with some fabric but not a lot of spots and lots of fabric areas... I suspect the size and non-sharpness of the needle.... good luck hehehe

  16. #66
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    Nuther thought is to straight stitch (with small sharp needle) about 1/16 in from the edge first... then zigzag over the straight stitch close enuf to cover it up. And as someone said on page 1/2, the applique zigzags should be mostly ON the fabric with just the right-swing missing the edge a tiny bit... 3/4 or 7/8 of the width of the zigzagging should be ON the fabric. good luck, again. Sheeps

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by scowlkat
    You can always use a one sided sew in fusible where you sew the non-fusible side to the right size of the fabric, make a small slit in the fusible and turn it right side out. After you smooth the seams out, you can then fuse the applique down and use a zig zag stitch. I prefer using a satin stitch because I really dislike the raw edge unless it is in a wall quilt that won't be washed very often.
    This is the method I use, except I sew to another piece of fabric, and then use a fabric glue stick for placement, and when all pieces are in place, then I sew them all down, with what ever stitch that may suit my fancy at that moment. God bless.

  18. #68
    Super Member cbridges22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by penny doty
    Quote Originally Posted by scowlkat
    You can always use a one sided sew in fusible where you sew the non-fusible side to the right size of the fabric, make a small slit in the fusible and turn it right side out. After you smooth the seams out, you can then fuse the applique down and use a zig zag stitch. I prefer using a satin stitch because I really dislike the raw edge unless it is in a wall quilt that won't be washed very often.
    This is the method I use, except I sew to another piece of fabric, and then use a fabric glue stick for placement, and when all pieces are in place, then I sew them all down, with what ever stitch that may suit my fancy at that moment. God bless.
    What if it is a small piece,say less than an inch,will this work?

  19. #69
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LucyInTheSky
    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    I used heat and bond to the back of the fabric fist and then attach it to the background , no problems
    Do you mean no problems when you're stitching it down later? Just want to make sure :)
    I use the same method as Sharon, I use blanket stitch on the machine after ironing fusible web to applique, cut around where I want, then stitch. If you are too close to the applique, you can shred the edge a little and leave an unfinished look.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    No problems stitching it down or fraying fabrics :thumbup:
    Heatn Bond Light --the purple/lavender labeled one. The red one will gum up the needle.

  21. #71
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    [ :thumbup:[/quote]

    Got a dumb question for you......
    What is the brand of the "non-woven fusible" you use? There are SOOOO many types and choices that I sometimes wish Eleanor would package her own brand so I could get just what she's using! HA! The one I see Eleanor using doesn't appear to have a paper backing so I guess the fusible material is only on one side. HELP

    :!: :shock: :oops:[/quote]
    Fusible stabilizer is another name for fusible interfacing. I normally use Pellon brand as I am familiar with how it reacts to my sewing and pressing methods. Any of it will work. The fusible side is the one with the rough little glue dots. I use the sheerest weight one for this applique technique so you don't have bulky edge seams.

  22. #72
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    If your fabric is fraying, it is probably due to the fact that there is a bias area on your applique. This happens often when you are using curved pieces. EX: going from crosswise to lengthwise grain you have some bias areas. One solution to this: USE A VERY FINE LINE of fray check, or fabric glue on the very edge of the fabric, let it dry. Most dry clear, test a sample first. Most of the time the stitching will cover the fray check or fabric glue. Hope this helps!

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