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Thread: Has anyone tried Quilt Theory Quilting?

  1. #1
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    I purchased a book & DVd set from Nancy's Notions on Quilt Theory by Betty Cotton. It sounds interesting. You make and quilt each block before joining it to other blocks, then assembly rows, etc... You can make a bed sized quilt without the need of a longarmer as all rows remain on your left. Has anyone tried this new procedure yet? Can you adjust this system for any quilt?
    Thanks!
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  2. #2
    Super Member 3incollege's Avatar
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    I saw Betty at a quilt show and bought a pattern for a table runner.
    I can't seem to figure it out. That was a few years ago I forgot about it. Maybe I'll find it and look at it again.

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    There has been some talk about some of the "quilt as you go" patterns making the quilts a little stiffer, due to the way that each section is joined. I would suggest trying a smaller lap quilt and see if you are happy with it :wink: :D

  4. #4
    Super Member quilterella's Avatar
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    I tried it a couple of years ago, bought both books, because someone told me it was fun and EASY. Well, it wasn't all that much fun and it sure wasn't that easy. However, the finished tablerunner is very pretty and extremely sturdy, so...I guess, anyone who tries this method will form their own opinion...Good Luck!

  5. #5
    Junior Member Newby0709's Avatar
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    I made Attic Windows. It takes a lot of cutting and labeling the stacks. Here are my results, front and back.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  6. #6
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newby0709
    I made Attic Windows. It takes a lot of cutting and labeling the stacks. Here are my results, front and back.
    Wow! That is gorgeous! You did a great job!
    Thanks for the pics!
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  7. #7
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilterella
    I tried it a couple of years ago, bought both books, because someone told me it was fun and EASY. Well, it wasn't all that much fun and it sure wasn't that easy. However, the finished tablerunner is very pretty and extremely sturdy, so...I guess, anyone who tries this method will form their own opinion...Good Luck!
    Yes, I'd have to agree with you....after viewing the dvd last night, I've come to the conclusion that it really doesn't appear all that 'easy'.
    Thanks!
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  8. #8
    Super Member DA Mayer's Avatar
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    what an awesome quilt, do you think if you did more than one or two and really felt comfortable with the method than it would be fun and easy?

  9. #9
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    There has been some talk about some of the "quilt as you go" patterns making the quilts a little stiffer, due to the way that each section is joined. I would suggest trying a smaller lap quilt and see if you are happy with it :wink: :D
    I think you are right about the quilts being stiffer; however I don't think it's because of the joining, but the over-quilting. After viewing the dvd last night, the 'theme' seemed that since you can quilt each block individually, you can use the embroidery feature of your machine to quilt with intricate patterns. It seemed over-quilted to me, and she quilted the joining strips. Her quilts are beautiful though.
    I'll take your advice and try a smaller version.
    Thanks!
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  10. #10
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Nice quilt Newby! I think the Fun and Done method is about the same as this. The how to video is free online at Bayside Quilting.


  11. #11
    Senior Member Extreme Quilter's Avatar
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    I have her patterns and always become so discouraged and overwhelmed by the instructions that I have yet to give her patterns a try. When I do try a quilt, I'm going to experiment with using flannel for batting, rather than the usual cotton batting. Maybe this will give the quilt a softer drape and not make it so stiff.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Lap quilting has been around for a long time Georgia Bonesteel had a show about it for years. I made 3 last winter this way. I enjoy being able to quilt the small pieces, but do not enfoy the closing of the seams later

  13. #13
    Senior Member grammatjr's Avatar
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    I have done a couple things with the Cotton Theory method, and enjoyed them both. They are a little time time consuming, but come off fairly easily. Becuase of the "theory" of how the blocks are created, you can make anything from a placemat to a king sized quilt with the same techniques - just more or larger blocks. I think reading about it is harder than doing it. My advice would be to dig up some scraps, and plan one placemat. That way you won't feel pressured to accomplish alot, but should have enough seams to get the feel of the tecnique. It is really cool that you have a finished quilt on both sides when you are done. And I really love tactile things! Here is a link to a pattern for a placemat:
    http://www.americaquiltscreatively.c...es/AQc_202.pdf
    Good luck, let us see what you do!

  14. #14
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    That is a beautiful quilt. I haven't tried this method yet.

  15. #15
    dannypanny's Avatar
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    Awesome quilt. Which is the front and which is the back????? Great work. ciao

  16. #16
    Junior Member Newby0709's Avatar
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    I made placemats first. Cotton Theory is reversible and doesn't matter front or back. I think it could work with less quilting rows than she recommends but mine doesn't feel too stiff.

    I've also made the Fun and Done. It has the pattern on one side, while you can reverse it, the back is very plain. It goes a lot faster without so much planning, cutting, and organization. I felt like I had accomplished something by the time I completed the Attic Windows. I like them both for the reason that each block is quilted as I go. With Georgia Bonesteel I still had to hand stitch the back and I don't like hand work. Ugh. I want instant gratification.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grammatjr
    I have done a couple things with the Cotton Theory method, and enjoyed them both. They are a little time time consuming, but come off fairly easily. Becuase of the "theory" of how the blocks are created, you can make anything from a placemat to a king sized quilt with the same techniques - just more or larger blocks. I think reading about it is harder than doing it. My advice would be to dig up some scraps, and plan one placemat. That way you won't feel pressured to accomplish alot, but should have enough seams to get the feel of the tecnique. It is really cool that you have a finished quilt on both sides when you are done. And I really love tactile things! Here is a link to a pattern for a placemat:
    http://www.americaquiltscreatively.c...es/AQc_202.pdf
    Good luck, let us see what you do!
    Thanks so much for the placemat pattern, and yes doing it will probably be easier than reading about it- it all sounds difficult. I'll try the placemat.
    I have a question....can I use any pattern? or must I always use her patterns? I understand that I'd have to add a strip inbetween blocks, but that might be the only difference between her patterns and others.
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  18. #18
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newby0709
    I made placemats first. Cotton Theory is reversible and doesn't matter front or back. I think it could work with less quilting rows than she recommends but mine doesn't feel too stiff.

    I've also made the Fun and Done. It has the pattern on one side, while you can reverse it, the back is very plain. It goes a lot faster without so much planning, cutting, and organization. I felt like I had accomplished something by the time I completed the Attic Windows. I like them both for the reason that each block is quilted as I go. With Georgia Bonesteel I still had to hand stitch the back and I don't like hand work. Ugh. I want instant gratification.
    Those look great and they don't look too stiff either. I'm with you, I like instant gratification! And it's nice that this is all machine stitched. I did visit Baysideequilting.com and found the 'Fun and Done'. I do think it might be a little easier with their templates, and they did have a great video about the process (free online feed). I suppose we can make the backing more lively by changing the backing.
    Thanks so much for your input!
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  19. #19
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    Great Quilt, the Attic Windows! I haven't tried it yet, but thanks for the links. I will check it out!

  20. #20
    Super Member Pzazz's Avatar
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    I made one this way at a quilt class a few years ago. It really was pretty easy. It "lives" at work for when we need to make a mini wall to partition an area for webinars. I'll try to remember to take a pic tomorrow and post it here. I wouldn't hesitate to make another one this way.

  21. #21
    Super Member OHSue's Avatar
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    If you want to try Quilt as You Go I recommend the Fun and Done quilts. I have used this method, I got the ruler as a gift, but you could do it on your own once you figure it out. Here is a link to a video that shows it being done, it really was quick and easy.

    https://www.baysidequilting.com/store/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=284]https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284[/url]

  22. #22
    Senior Member adriansmom's Avatar
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    I took a class for this. It was a placemat and the block used was the courthouse steps block. It seemed easy...but way overquilted for me. If I didn't have my walking foot it would have been a miserable experience. My machine did not like all the bulk.

  23. #23
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OHSue
    If you want to try Quilt as You Go I recommend the Fun and Done quilts. I have used this method, I got the ruler as a gift, but you could do it on your own once you figure it out. Here is a link to a video that shows it being done, it really was quick and easy.

    https://www.baysidequilting.com/store/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=284]https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284[/url]
    Thanks so much! I've gone to baysidequilting.com and seen the video, it seems easier than Quilt Theory quilting, I've ordered the templates for the Fun & Done. I'll try both methods and see what happens.
    I'm really looking for an alternative for bed sized quilts as I don't have a longarm, just a regular sewing machine, and I don't feel like taking everything to a longarmer...we only have 3 in my area that are fully booked and very expensive.
    Thanks again,
    Kindest Regards,
    MaryAnna

  24. #24
    Super Member Pzazz's Avatar
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    MaryAnna...I can soooo relate to that. Tomorrow I am sandwiching a quilt for my step-son and DIL. It is HUGE!! I will tough it out on my machine...or maybe borrow my step-daughters as hers has a slightly larger throat than mine. This one will end up part machine done, (SID), and then hand quilted block centres. There are no longarmers where I live, so if I were to go that route, I would have to send it away...and yes, they are very pricey!!

    The quilt I did "as you go" was not over quilted. It was done as a learning quilt....so every block was something different.

  25. #25
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    Yes, Pzazz, you will have a fight on your hands with trying to machine quilt a bed quilt on a regular machine! Hand quilting the center would be the only way possible. But there might be another option.....I had a thought, and it was 'validated' by my noticing a store bought quilt- the backing had 3 seams horizontal. Which backed my hunch...what if we divide the bed quilt into 3rds? Then pieced each 3rd together, matching seams, etc.? We would be able to machine quilt each section, then join them together. By joining them together, the fabric bulk would be to our left. It's an idea worth pursuing.
    Any thoughts on that one?
    Kind Regards,
    MaryAnna

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