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Thread: Have you used Press N' Seal Glad wrap to machine quilt a design?

  1. #1
    Super Member copycat's Avatar
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    Question Have you used Press N' Seal Glad wrap to machine quilt a design?

    The wrap is sticky on one side so it can stay put on your quilt after you have drawn the design. Next you quilt on your drawn lines and then tear away the wrap. Have any of you tried this method?
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  2. #2
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I did once years ago, for me it was a huge mistake. I used a sharpie to draw the design. As the needle poked through the lines it ( transferred the sharpie permanent ink) to my quilt top. The background was white. Ruined the quilt with black ink that did not wash out. I never tried it again. I have read people do use it successfully. Guess I just did it wrong.
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  3. #3
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i tried it years ago. i used a black marker to draw my design. the needle piercing the plastic pushed marker dust through the design onto my quilt... some of it didn't come out.
    Nancy in western NY
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Cactus Stitchin's Avatar
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    Yes! I love doing it this way. Worked great for me. Depending upon the quilting removing it later can be a bother but was so much easier overall. I'm not terribly experienced with quilting so it helped a lot.

  5. #5
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    I also made the mistake of using a sharpie and got colour transfer to my quilt. It would work well if you could use a different pen, maybe the Frixion pens would work?

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    I found something similar that I really like. It's called Miracle Film and I believe it's made by Marathon. It's a transparent stabilizer that has perforations allover. I mark my design on the Miracle Film and affix it to the quilt top with a light spray of temporary adhesive. Once quilted through, the film tears away easily because of all the perforations. It is made to come off with heat, but I never need to bother with that because it tears away so easily.
    Since you can see through it, placement is a snap.
    (The way you remove it with heat is to hover a hot iron over it. The film shrinks into little balls that can be brushed away.)
    I do use a thin permanent sharpie for the marks on the film, but I let it dry thoroughly overnight before quilting it, and have had no black transfer onto the quilt. A couple of times I cheated and dried it with a hairdryer on low (and not held close---remember it melts), and that worked well, too.

  7. #7
    Junior Member Quiltlove's Avatar
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    I use this method a lot. It's also great for testing your designs before sewing. I will say, however, if I can come up with a design that has templates, I prefer to use the pounce or Sue Pellen's iron off powder. It depends on how you choose to transfer your designs to your quilt. Free motion quilting, of course will require no lines to follow. Each project you attempt has unique properties that must be considered when choosing the design transfer method.
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  8. #8
    Junior Member Quiltlove's Avatar
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    I probably should have added that I use those pilot erasable pens to draw on the press n seal. Another product I have used is for machine embroidery. It is clear and washes away, but you can draw on it the same. I think it is called vilene.
    Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cactus Stitchin's Avatar
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    When I did mine, I used a water soluble pen and did have minor leakage onto the quilt below. I was able to remove it easily with a q-tip dipped in water so no harm done.

  10. #10
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    I tried it in a "quilt marking" class and didn't like it compared to thin tissue paper with spray adhesive. I was doing a FMQ design that involved a bit of tracing lines to get back to certain points and those double-stitched lines were a nightmare to pluck all of that plastic out of. I didn't even finish since it was just a class sampler. The tissue paper didn't stick quite as well but then it all just rubbed completely off afterwards with almost no effort.

    There was a self-adhesive stabilizer she had us try, too, and that was the worst. Gummed my needle up like nobody's business.

  11. #11
    Super Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    I tried it once. It would be fine for quilting that wasn't too dense. I had the most problem pulling the wrap out of quilting lines that intersected. That was almost impossible to get all out. Pulling on those areas tended to loosen the threads.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Kath12's Avatar
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    I took a class with Kent Mick and he showed us a method using the press 'n seal. He drew a pattern on a plain piece of paper then laid press 'n seal over the design. Then he stitched (without thread) the design with the machine. You then have the design perforated on the press 'n seal. Next peel the paper away and lay the press 'n seal onto your quilt and tape it down with painters tape. Then you use a "pounce" pad and rub the chalk into the perforated design. When you remove the press 'n seal you have the design marked on your quilt
    Kathy Stewart from IA
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  13. #13
    Super Member EmiliasNana's Avatar
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    I have used this many times with Frixion or Crayola Ultra-Clean markers to transfer my designs. Shorten your stitch length a bit to facilitate removal, but if the quilting is dense it can be difficult to remove. I found THE BEST way to remove the Press and Seal from tight areas is to use the eraser end of the Frixion pen or a clean white artist's eraser. It grabs the plastic wrap and makes removal a breeze.

  14. #14
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I use parchment paper like you use in baking. It is stronger than tissue paper, less expensive than Golden Threads paper, is transparent enough to trace design and tears away easily. I just pin it in place. I use a frixion pen so there's no worry about ink transfer.

    I'll have to try stitching on the lines to perforate and use a pounce to see how the design transfers. It doesn't seem like the holes would be big enough but I will sure give it a try.

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    I have found that drawing my quilting pattern on Golden Thread paper with Crayola washable pens works the best for me. At one time I used ultra fine line black permanent markers but they did leave black dots on my quilts. With the Crayola pens I have no problem. I pin the paper to my quilt using quilting safety pins.

    Read about the Crayola pens on this board so a big thank you for the one who first brought the idea to our attention.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Kath12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by citruscountyquilter View Post
    I use parchment paper like you use in baking. It is stronger than tissue paper, less expensive than Golden Threads paper, is transparent enough to trace design and tears away easily. I just pin it in place. I use a frixion pen so there's no worry about ink transfer.

    I'll have to try stitching on the lines to perforate and use a pounce to see how the design transfers. It doesn't seem like the holes would be big enough but I will sure give it a try.
    Use a larger needle (size 16 or18)
    Kathy Stewart from IA
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  17. #17
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    Yes I have tried that method and never again! I liked to never get the stuff pulled off.

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    Since you are talking about Frixion pens have you ever had a problem with the design reappearing? I bought a set and like how they work but I don't want to give someone a quilt to have the pattern show up later.

  19. #19
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    I tried it once and never again there are much better things to use but I have decided to stick with free motion as the press and seal was a nightmare to pull off

  20. #20
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    Check out u-tube. There's a few videos on using netting,[ the bridle stuff.] You trace the motif onto the netting to make a stencil and then use it just as you would a regular stencil. And it is re-usable. Haven't tried it yet but I will.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I used it once. Once was enough for me. Pulling out all those tiny pieces of wrap was tedious and maddening, made me throw the project away. I'm glad it was a potholder. LOL
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    Last year I tried both the Press n Seal and tissue paper with spray adhesive and they both were a bear to pick out afterwards but thankfully the sharpie didn't get punched through. Since then I've only used it to try out FMQ ideas, then took it off.
    I'm eternally on the search for a good way to mark my quilts.

  23. #23
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I did this with green Crayola marker and what a mistake! The needle punched the green through to the white background and while I was able to dab it off and I could breath again, the design was so tight that I had to pick out the stitching to get the plastic out.
    Now I do use it for creating designs--I will take a photo of the quilt/block and then put Press N'Seal over the photo and then draw on it to see if I can find a good design.

  24. #24
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    I use it for large patterns on medium to dark fabrics. I mark one day, let dry overnight and then stitch the next. For light fabrics, I use paper-newspaper, parchment and leftover rolls from doctors office (hard to get now). Due to vision loss, I just can't see marking lines directly on fabric, darn it!

  25. #25
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    I don't even use Press 'n' Seal in the kitchen. I bought some, but threw it away because it left a sticky residue on the dishes that was really hard to scrub off.

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