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Thread: Here is a photo of my rag quilt that wont rag properly so you can hopefully help me....

  1. #1

  2. #2
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    How deep are your cuts? They look a couple inches or so...

  3. #3
    sunnyhope's Avatar
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    some are short, around a short inch, others got a bit longer and i m thinking maybe some of the outer ones needs cutting down.

    but it def needs sum TLC later as its been washed 3 times and are not exactly feeling very soft.....

  4. #4
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    I'm no expert, however I've made three denim/cotten rag quilts and I clipped probably no more than 1/2 inch and they have frayed nicely. 100% cotton fabric, right?

  5. #5
    sunnyhope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamsbuying
    I'm no expert, however I've made three denim/cotten rag quilts and I clipped probably no more than 1/2 inch and they have frayed nicely. 100% cotton fabric, right?
    its 100% COTTON AND SUM FLANEL , and flanel should rag nicely too as far as i v been told here

  6. #6
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    Also, I looked at your pictures again and it reminded me... I clipped all the way to the stitching being very careful not to clip the stitching. I made really close together cuts, too; probably not more than 1/4 inch apart. Hope this helps...

  7. #7
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    you are right, flannel should fray nicely! There are a lot of people on this site with more experience than I have, so I'm sure you will get good advice.

  8. #8
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamsbuying
    you are right, flannel should fray nicely! There are a lot of people on this site with more experience than I have, so I'm sure you will get good advice.
    After making several of those I find that cheap flannel (from Walmart or similar) frays easier than expensive flannel from your LQS. The down side is that it also shrinks more.

    Maria

  9. #9
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    I understand that you have washed it several time but have you dried it in a dryer?

  10. #10
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    duplicate

  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    You have to clip very close to the stitching. It helps to stitch the long seam two times in case your scissors slip. Your strips seem be too long and too wide to fray tightly and may just ravel instead of fraying.

  12. #12
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    I love to make raggy quilts so I consider myself not an expert, but someone who definitely can give you some tips! First of all, if you have used a combination of 100% cotton and flannel fabrics, you should be able to get a nice 'fray'. You do need to remember that you are only going to want about a 1/2 to 3/4 inch seam allowance..then you should clip every half inch, or so...right down to the stitching. I purchased a pair of scissors that are kind of like springy...they are specific for rag quilting and I love them (otherwise your hand will really hurt). Since you have already made this quilt...I would suggest that you go completely around it and trim the frayed edges down to no more than an inch...preferably a little less...and then wash/dry it again. It should turn out more like you are envisioning. Right now it kind of looks like a cross between a raggy quilt and one of those no-sew fleecy blankets where you leave the longer strips (2-3) inches and then knot them. I certainly hope you don't think I am being hyper critical of your work...but I do sense you are frustrated with it and these are just suggestions! Good luck! And, in defense of those tied-fleecy blankets...they are fun to do also...especially for kids to do!

  13. #13
    Junior Member ChristineD's Avatar
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    The first rag quilt I made I washed at home in my top load, adgetating washer and it frayed really well.

    I made my second rag quilt and had the same problem you are having. It wouldn't fray. The only difference is that I took it to the laundry mat and put it in a front load washer. I didn't have time to wash it again at home.

    It was the same pattern so that couldn't have been an issue. They were 1/2" seam allowance and I cut 1/2" apart on both quilts.

    I can only assume the front load washer was not enough motion to cause fraying.

    Good luck.
    Christine

  14. #14
    sunnyhope's Avatar
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    I will sit down 2morrow and cut them slimmer and shorter and then hope for the best. and nope no thumbledrier but i can do that this time, i dont have drier s i have 2 take this 2 mum anyway.

    btw, our washer went kadooodledo a few days after washing this quilt,,,,,,,,,,,,,, u dont think my quillt has messed up my washer do you..... plz say no,lol

    we r having someone to come look at it on monday but we have removed lots of thread :oops:

  15. #15
    Senior Member moosegirl's Avatar
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    You might want to try a brush with med stiff brisels to loosed the weave of the fabric before you wash it again. I have had some success on projects with this method. Moosegirl

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    Oh, I know I have always been told that these raggy quilts are very hard on our washer and driers. Sometimes I take mine in to the laundramat for that very reason. We live in the country and everything goes to our septic system and I am afraid the threads might be bad for that, as well. And I have never thought about there being a difference between the top loading and the front loading washers. Hmmmmm...you may be on to something there. No matter where you wash and dry, you do need to clean out the filters very frequently during the cycles. And, I do think drying in a drying will help to get that fluffy look. Let us know how it turns out after you do your trimming!

  17. #17
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunnyhope
    I will sit down 2morrow and cut them slimmer and shorter and then hope for the best. and nope no thumbledrier but i can do that this time, i dont have drier s i have 2 take this 2 mum anyway.

    btw, our washer went kadooodledo a few days after washing this quilt,,,,,,,,,,,,,, u dont think my quillt has messed up my washer do you..... plz say no,lol

    we r having someone to come look at it on monday but we have removed lots of thread :oops:
    You could try looking to see if you have a blocked filter somewhere. Mine is low down in the front, behind a little door. Be prepared with a couple of cloths to catch any water that drains out.

  18. #18
    Super Member chewboo's Avatar
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    and the answer is yes it can mess up your washer most take them to a laundry mate to do also you do need to clip kit closer

  19. #19
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam B
    And I have never thought about there being a difference between the top loading and the front loading washers.
    Yes, there's quite a difference. The top loaders use an agitator to twist and turn clothing back and forth. If you've ever unloaded a sheet that has been twisted into knots in the washing machine, you'll get the idea. Front loaders, on the other hand, simply use gravity to have the clothes tumble from the top of the drum down. This is a much more gentle action. Front loaders are better for clothing; top loaders are better for ragging quilts.

  20. #20
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Your tabs look like they are too long. It may a therapeutic session to trim them back with scissors to about 1/2" then rewash and see what happens.

  21. #21
    Member funnyfarm's Avatar
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    I saw a video of them using a weed eater to whip the rag edges into fraying.

  22. #22
    allisonirons's Avatar
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    I think part of the problem is that you didn't cut the little cuts close enough together. I usually do mine about 1/4" apart and that helps it fray really nicely. If you want more fray (as annoying as it is and will be) I suggest you go back through and cut the little clips again and smaller. That should help

  23. #23
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Also I think drying it in a tunble dryer is where alot of the fraying happens. I know when you dry them at home you have to be "very" careful witht he lint trap not filling up and getting plugged. Worth a try

  24. #24
    Super Member grma33's Avatar
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    a suggestion is find a large zippered washable bag to wash it in.
    I use my dog`s pillow case cover.
    Gale

  25. #25

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    I've made several rag quilts, all using flannal. I sew a 1/2 seam and clip to the stitches, being careful to not cut through the seam. Putting it in the dryer after it is washed is what makes the seams fray so nicely. A warning: check your filter on the dryer a few times during drying because you will have a lot of lint.
    I also have special scizzors just for rag quilts. They are a bit pricey, but they make the job so much easier.
    Good Luck :lol:

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