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Thread: How many of you do your own quilting versus sending it out?

  1. #1
    Senior Member johnette's Avatar
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    I have a king sized top done and sitting on the shelf for months now. It has too many seams to hand quilt (I don't have a frame any way). I don't think I can machine quilt it on my little ole' Singer. I have only machine quilted one crib sized qult before. I have done hand quilting and sent one top out to be done. I wasn't pleased with the result and vowed to do it my self from now on, but...there just aren't enough hours in the day. What do you all do? I'm torn because I can make a good argument with myself both ways. Help! :?

  2. #2
    Super Member azdesertrat's Avatar
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    If it is really big,I would send it out.Ireally prefer to send mine out if I can afford to do it.I really like making the tops

  3. #3
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    My favorite part is the quilting itself and I love doing it by hand, It may take a while but I feel it is worth it in the end.

  4. #4
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
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    I like to do my own. I've never sent one out to be quilted, but I might sometime.

  5. #5
    Super Member purplemem's Avatar
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    I have hand quilted about 9 baby quilts. I am piecing a crib size quilt right now and will hand quilt next week. I don't use a frame for these because I find it easier to manipulate.

    I am making a queen size quilt for my daughter's wedding present and will send it to a long armer for quilting.

    I am sending my best friend's wedding quilt to the same long armer.

    I got a new frame for Mother's Day and will put a queen quilt on it in the fall and quilt all winter.

    My sewing/quilting circle is quilting a queen size on a frame, it has been in the making for a year now. We don't meet every week so it takes us forever to quilt.

    Purple

  6. #6
    GMA
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    Junior Member GMA's Avatar
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    IMO if it is going to be my quilt then I want to quilt my quilt and put the finishing touches on it. JMO

  7. #7
    mgshaw's Avatar
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    Up until now I have always hand quilted them myself, but Miss Jacquemoe is fixing to get one shortly to do for me!!!!!!

  8. #8
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I would send one that size out to be done.
    I'm sure that if you ask here, someone can give you info on GREAT sites/people to send them to.
    Other than Jacquemoe, I"m sure there are others that might do it for you too.
    I think it's Purplemem who gave me name of someone that will do it for you too.

  9. #9
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    I used to hand quilt all my quilts. but now my hands won't let me quilt that much. So if the quilt is lap size or smaller I do it on my machine. Anything bigger the Long armer gets it and she does a beautiful job. I have one here right now that is going to her as soon as i get the backing ready. Marge

  10. #10
    thequiltlady08's Avatar
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    I have only hand quilted. I am saving money now to buy a TinLizzie or Handiquilter... I cannot afford to have someone else do it. I love the old look one gets with hand quilting - yes it takes a long time, but I've learned that it's worth it in the end... and that if one has it sitting there available one can stitch a few stitches at odd hours. I do not use a frame either - usually do it on my lap as others are watching TV in the evening - I can be with them but do something constructive. I have just ordered an Aunt Becky tool - I hope this will help me. I'm waiting until next pay day to order a lap hoop - with a stand.

  11. #11

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    It takes my long arm quilter 4 hours or less to get a quilt done. It takes me that long to prepare the binding for a quilt :!: I usually take her 4 or 5 at a time thru the summer in her slow months. She gives me a break on price, I don't rush her to get them done, I tell her to use her own judgement on thread choice and I haven't been disappointed yet. While she's quilting my quilts, I prepare the bindings for all of them, store them in a see thru plastic bin and be ready to apply them when I get my quilts back. That way, I can piece more quilts which is what I like to do best anyway. You might say I'm a piecer, not a quilter!

  12. #12
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    I don't anyone around my area that has quilting services, so I tend to do my own. I don't mind machine quilting, but my favourite preference is hand quilting. It's just a shame it takes forever to finish them!!!

  13. #13
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I have tried hand quilting, but it comes out looking really, REALLY bad, so I don't do it.

  14. #14
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    I have one quilt that was "sent out" and it was a gift. I have machine quilted 2 quilts, simple cross hatch, and was not terriabley happy with the results, so I just hand quilt. I pin baste very closely, and use a small pvc (?) pipe frame that dh made for me. Kind of like the lap quilt frames I have seen, only on legs. I quilt a small area, then move the quilt. I do mostly queen size quilts. Works very well for me, and doesn't take up a lot of space. Good luck with what ever you deceide to do.

    Phyllis

  15. #15
    Super Member Joan's Avatar
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    I am sending mine out for the time being. As a beginner, it is a major accomplishment just to get a quilt cut out correctly and pieced together. My long arm quilter does a good job and is reasonable but eventually I would like to learn to quilt them myself. If you are having difficulty finding a "good" long arm quilter, make it a habit to ask for samples of her finished work. (Yes, I would be extremely disappointed if the quilting was unsatisfactory!!!!!!!!) It also wouldn't hurt to "ask around". I bet there are several readers who do long arm quilting just on this board alone.

  16. #16
    community benefactor collettakay's Avatar
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    My favorite parts of quilting are the planning and the quilting. I love to sit in front of the TV in the evening and hand-quilt. I love seeing the progress as I go. It's like a puzzle or mowing the yard. (I love to mow. lol)

    If you don't have a deadline for the quilt, go for it yourself. I like the feeling I get from knowing I made a quilt from start to finish.

  17. #17
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I dont make large quilts as a rule. I only made one and sent it out to the quilter. I quilt up to a lap size on my home machine which has a 10 inch throat. The longer throat really helps alot. Not near as hard to stuff thru.
    Mostly I use the walking foot then free motion the border.

  18. #18
    Super Member DA Mayer's Avatar
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    I have hand quilted, sent out and machine quilted my own. Depending on how fast and how your life is at the time is what may help you decide. A king size is really nice to send to a longarmer with a machine that will accomodate that size of quilt. Good luck deciding. My first really nice quilt went to a quilter and I was amazed how nice my quilt could look, I think it made my quilting look better.

  19. #19
    MaxineB's Avatar
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    As a new quilter, I decided I would have to quilt as well as piece. The cost was too much to send all my quilts out. That would make my new hobby a burden. My first 2 quilts were king size. I did a stitch in the ditch on the first one. I did a diamond design on the second one using a grid. My machine is a Bernina and the throat is not especially large. I just rolled it tight & secured it with baby diaper pins all the way down. I started in the middle. I just bought the Pounce because I read on this board that it worked well. I hope it helps me learn meandering stitching.

  20. #20

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    (deep breath) I was going to send out the two tops I just completed last month... but then my DH lost his job, and it made me CRAZY thinking of my hard work just sitting there in the closet.

    Since I was sick of thinking about it, and because I promised my daughter her quilt would be done by the time it got cold I planned out the quilting. Machine (by my little Elna) for the blocks and hand quilting for the sashing. This isn't how I'd intended and I have tendonitice in my hands, so I'll have to be very careful. But DH promised me before we started if I can't get it done he will find a hand quilter to finish it. Oh golly that reminds me... Time to get back to sewing.

  21. #21
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    I quilt my own on my sewing machine and only know how to meander and crosshatch at the moment.

  22. #22
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    I agree with Auntluc-I am a piecer, not a quilter!! I will machine quilt baby quilts and wall hangings. And those take me HOURS AND HOURS-and I am talking about just getting the inspiration to do something!! Then more and more hours for the quilting. Anything else goes out to the quilter. I cannot hand quilt because I have arthritis in my thumbs. Any hand work, even binding, takes me a long time.

  23. #23
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    I've done everything from hand-piecing/hand-quilting to machine-piecing/hand-quilting, to machine-piecing/machine quilting...
    and I just last month took some tops to be done on a long arm for the very first time. They are tops I've had around for YEARS plus some that are really big and I didn't want to 'fight' with them.

    I don't hand piece any more...

    I did hand quilt that red/white/blue Irish chain and the whole time I worked on it I wished I had NOT started the hand quilting. I have arthritis in my hands plus diabetes and hypothyroid and my hands cramp something terrible when I hand sew. I do hand sew the back side of bindings but it takes me awhile... I just think it looks better done by hand (on the back side).

    I've done stitch-in-the-ditch and stippling and meandering (my understanding is: stippling is closely spaced and meandering isn't 8) )
    I have NOT done any of that "oh wow, that's fantastic" type of quilting that I know can be done on a regular machine - I just don't have the patience and I get really irritated and bugged when I'm trying to do something really (really) carefully and want to make it really beautiful and booger it up right off the bat... so then I wind up stippling... so I figure I'll stick with stitch-in-the ditch and stippling/meandering.

    The most important thing is NOT an expensive machine - I've done stippling on a $70 Brother from Walmart - it wasn't my favorite but certainly acceptable. The most important thing is to make sure the tension is balanced and DON'T MOVE THE FABRIC TOO FAST.
    I use two old Singer 301 machines for piecing and quilting and just today finally got the bobbin case for the Singer 15-90 that we found (1948 ) and want to try quilting on it.
    and you want a darning foot.


    Then make sure you've basted or pinned ALOT.. I use the big safety pins - got tired of stabbing myself.

    Start in the middle and work your way out to an edge then go back to the middle.

    The best thing to do is jump in with both feet. ... have a seam ripper handy LOL ... just don't cut the fabric :roll:

    practice on something... stippling is easy after all...
    invest three dollars in a pair of rubberized gardening gloves from walmart - you'll be amazed how they help maneuver the quilt...

    most of all don't beat up on yourself, don't expect to be perfect the first, fifth, tenth time.... there is no such thing ... well, maybe... I've seen some pretty spectacular quilts but really - are they actually used on a bed? In the crib?

  24. #24
    Junior Member salisaquilter's Avatar
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    I have done king, queen and reg. on my machine. the trick is to baste them well and have a second table on the side.
    I have hand quilted them also. I would not think of sending them out. I feel it would not have been done by myself.
    I take great pride in completing the quilt myself.
    Give your self time to think this out.

  25. #25
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I have made around 7 queensize quilts(and many many more twin/lap size)that I have quilted on my machine, pretty much either stitch in the ditch, or coming across on the diagonals. I currently have a large queen in flannels for my bed that I am considering sending out to have done. My shoulders couldn't handle that heavy of a quilt. Around here a queen would cost me $200-$250 or more and I can't afford that. My new Bernina has some great decorative stitches and I have been playing with those a lot. I would have to say I am a piecer. I love picking out the fabs, cutting them and putting tops together. Sandwiching (which I use the basting spray) and actual quilting are not that enjoyable for me. (I have 8 or 9 (sandwiched) up on my son's bed waiting to be done) I would love to find some long-armers on this board for when I am ready to have the flannel one done.

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