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Thread: I was so sad...

  1. #101
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    My DIL has no clue what a sewing machine is or an oven unless micro is in its name.So I can't wait til they all move here so I can show my 3 GDs how to sew and have someone to bake for again.My son use to use the sewing machine and bake cookies and cakes from scratch

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam B View Post
    Even at church...we project just the words to the hymns onto a big screen....our worship comm says it doesn't matter because people can't read music anyway so why bother with hymnals..
    Oh this is sad... I taught myself to read music by following along with the hymnal. How many other children have done this? and how many will miss the opportunity? What a shame they have assumed people aren't smart enough to read music.

  3. #103
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    What wonderful stories you have all told! I was certainly not expecting a response like this to my little rant. Hopefully those of us who learned creative arts from our parents and grandparents will continue to find oppportunities to pass those skills forward to the next generations. Me, I am going to try to find other outlets where I can pass these skills along. Thanks everyone for the inspiration!!

    Laura

  4. #104
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Bless the Moms, Dads, Grandmoms, and Teachers that share sewing! I took Home-Ec, back in the day when that was a course. I attempted to sew some bib overhauls (in style back in the 70s). I tried to use my mom's Singer and had nothing but problems, gave up on sewing until 30+ years later. My mom made us some stuffed critters and some elastic band pants but didn't know enough to teach me anything about it. I don't think she really wanted me to use the machine.
    :-)
    CAS

  5. #105
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    I was so sad...

    When I was a Boy Scout leader, one of the first things I did with the troop was teach the boys how to sew their merit badges onto their sashes. Many had no clue how to thread a needle, let alone sew with it. By the time I was finished with them, they were able to sew on their merit badges, lost buttons and some could even hem their trousers! I had many a Mom thank me...especially the Moms of boys who went on to Eagle Scout. Scouts must earn 22 merit badges which equals a lot of sewing! :-)
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  6. #106
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Reminds me of Girl Scout Troop I was able to visit. Mom could not afford Girl Scouts but we were in a program for poor kids to take part.

    Quote Originally Posted by ILoveToQuilt View Post
    When I was a Boy Scout leader, one of the first things I did with the troop was teach the boys how to sew their merit badges onto their sashes. Many had no clue how to thread a needle, let alone sew with it. By the time I was finished with them, they were able to sew on their merit badges, lost buttons and some could even hem their trousers! I had many a Mom thank me...especially the Moms of boys who went on to Eagle Scout. Scouts must earn 22 merit badges which equals a lot of sewing! :-)
    :-)
    CAS

  7. #107
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    I had that experience when a young man saw a typewriter in my attorney's office and he was amazed that the letters appeared immediately on the paper and you didn't have to send anything to a printer.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchit123 View Post
    My DIL has no clue what a sewing machine is or an oven unless micro is in its name.So I can't wait til they all move here so I can show my 3 GDs how to sew and have someone to bake for again.My son use to use the sewing machine and bake cookies and cakes from scratch
    Mine either :-) but my 3 yr old granddaughter loves to sit in my lap and use the machine with me. We go very slowly and her fingers stay away from the needle but she enjoys it so much. And piecing fabrics on the design wall, she knows just how she wants the colors aligned and she is now my design buddy! even my daughters are getting involved again. If only the D-I-L had any interest... never even took home-ec. I don't think they even offer sewing anymore where we live.

  9. #109
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    How many kids out there have never seen wall (or desk) phones with cords? Pay phones? Vinyl record albums, 45's, cassette tapes? VCR tapes? Typewriters? To think we think cell phones, CD's and DVDs and laptops are "newfangled" inventions, they are the only technology the kids know! I guess I'm getting old...hehehe...my DH would probably agree with me, but then again he IS 5 years younger than I am, so he'll never quite catch up to me. [I'm 56.5 years young on a good day and 113 years old on a bad day!] Ah well...just think how many changes we've seen in our lifetime and think of how many the kids of today will see in theirs. Makes you stop and think, doesn't it?
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  10. #110
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraRG View Post
    I work with preschoolers and for Mother's Day this year I thought it would be fun learning experience if they got to use a sewing machine to sew a pillow for their moms. I cut the fronts of white muslin and the backs of an assortment of pretty fabrics. The children used fabric markers to make a picture and write their names on the fronts and chose fabric for the backs. We read a couple of books about fabric and talked about our clothing, blankets and other textiles.

    Here's what made me sad... of my class of 9 children not a single one had ever seen a sewing machine. I showed them the parts, they helped thread it, how it worked, etc and they were so excited by the process. I put the foot pedal on the table next to the machine... they "hit the gas" using their hands and I guided the fabric. (I used a s l o w speed!) It was a smashing success! Even sadder, only one of my co-workers owns a sewing machine. One mom did come in and say her son couldn't stop talking about using "Miss Laura's Machine" to the point where she took the plants off the top of her great grandmother's treadle machine to show it to him.

    At least now there are 9 more humans who have seen, touched and used a sewing machine. Maybe one of them willl become a quilter!

    Laura
    Wow what a powerful story! You have touched the lives of those 9 children more than you know! You are an angel!
    Love 4 stchen

  11. #111
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Talk about a generation gap! Yikes!
    Love 4 stchen

  12. #112
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    I am reminded of how often our skill sets fit our circumstances. Preschoolers that haven't seen a sewing machine but probably know how to operate a computer game that we can't figure out. It is a novelty item to them just like a computer game was to us.

    It used to scare the daylights out of me to take my children to town because they had no concept of walking in traffic. My mother didn't drive and when I was 5 I could cross US41 by myself because I needed that skill.

    My husband and I were talking about carrying water. My grandparents didn't have running water and neither did we several times in my life including the 7 years before I married. I know that I can more easily carry two buckets of water - no matter the size - than one but a lot of people we know don't realize that.

    I know how to clean a chicken, milk a cow, churn butter, use a wringer washer and a million other skills most people today don't have because they don't need them for their life. Just the other day I showed a young man how to use a slide rule.

    I have seen in this thread the comment that most adults don't need English, math and science but that simply isn't true. We just use them without realizing it.

    I am not convinced we could slip right into the lives of any of the people we are criticizing for not sewing without some difficulty.

    Just think, if they all wanted to do what we do it would drive prices even higher and God knows they are nearly out of range now!

    JMHO

  13. #113
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    My daughter is in a school lunchtime club that does basic cookery. One week they were making chocolate chip cookies and the teacher asked for suggestions as to what ingredients they would need. One boy said 'cookie dough'. I guess his mom buys hers ready made. I thought that was sad enough, but your story is sadder!
    Quote Originally Posted by HomespunHandmaiden View Post
    Oh my goodness...that is so sad! That's probably the part where I would have sent him home with the recipe and whole big bunch of them...what is the world coming to?

  14. #114
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    They also are not taught to count change back. Registers tell them the amount to give but they're "bum-fuzzled" if your bill is, say, $14.07 and you give them a 20 and 7 cents!

  15. #115
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    That is really sad. It makes me think, even at work, I don't know anyone else that sews there or even has a machine. I used to get people all the time asking me to fix their clothes(thank goodness that stopped). There is a plus to it...My kids are all younger...they range from 4- 15 yrs old. Everytime one of their friends come over, we get them sewing or doing some other craft. Last night, my daughter had a sleep over. I had all the kids sitting and hand sewing while they watched a movie. Even though they don't sew at home, you can still do what you can to get them sewing too. Whether it be your kids coming over with friends, or grand-kids' friends.
    My oldest daughter's friends all save their craft projects for the fair at the end of the summer. They try to enter in as many categories as possible(from sewing to gardening and everything in between). They usually work on them a little bit on the weekends. It's a good way for all the kids to stay busy and they can earn ribbons(sometimes a $1-$3 if they get 1st, 2nd, or 3rd prize).
    enjoy your life...it's the only one you have!!!
    Heather

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftyneedle View Post
    They also are not taught to count change back. Registers tell them the amount to give but they're "bum-fuzzled" if your bill is, say, $14.07 and you give them a 20 and 7 cents!
    Making change is one of the early math lessons around here.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  17. #117
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    Neither of my boys married a girl who sews, though both are talented and crafty in other ways. Often when I visit, theire is a basket of mending or shirts needing mending awaiting me. I can't count the number of curtains, drapes, Roman shades (one DIL's favorite window treatment) I've made for their houses. One son/DIL just sold their house and moved to another city, and bought a new one. The people who bought their former house loved the window treatments, which wouldn't fit (size, color, style) in their new one anyway. Their buyers paid an extra $3000 for their window treatments.

    The good thing, though, is that one of my granddaughters (13 now) loves to sew. I taught her and gave her one of my older machines. Last Christmas, I gave her a new one. Both her greatgrandmothers sewed. Maybe it's an ever-other (or three)-generation thing. My mother didn't sew. I learned from my grandmothers.

  18. #118
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    So sad that so many of the homemaker arts are going by the wayside. How many girls do any canning now? Sewing seems to be getting another "lost art" for the younger generation plus all the fast food meals. Cooking from "scratch" is also fading. I am lucky I guess as some of my grand children do sew some at least and a couple are great cooks but by and large it's pre-made, pre-cooked and fast 'n easy....sigh...I do miss some of the good old days.
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  19. #119
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
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    I took cooking and sewing in 4H as well as in HS. Have been sewing my own clothing since I was 10 years old.
    Probably wouldn't have met and married my DH without having taken home ec in HS. Our "final" our senior year was to bake cookies and send them to the USO for our servicemen in Vietnam. We each filled a large coffee can, wrapping two cookies flat sides together and wrapping them in Saran Wrap. We were instructed to put a note inside giving our name and address as the soldiers would be required to write a thank you note to the person sending their cookies. The soldier that received my package thanked me and asked if I would mind writing to him. We wrote regularly for over a year before he was sent back to the states and actually met for the first time. We were married 1 year to the day after actually meeting for the first time and have been married for 43 years next month. We have 3 grown sons and a daughter and they have all been taught to cook, bake, sew, and iron. Two of the sons are actually the cooks for their families as their spouses never learned these skills. I am now teachimg the grandchildren the same skills. I do wish they would teach life skills in school including money management and parenting. I would have liked to have had some parenting classes before raising children.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryLane View Post
    You were indeed lucky then. I was born in 1964. I was the daughter of a divorce' (his choice, not hers) in a small town in the 70s. I was making clothes for myself, my sisters and my mother before I was 10. Kids made fun of me. They would check the fabric in the local dime store to see if what I wore matched it and tease me about it.

    On the other hand, my mom's friends were amazed at how well I sewed. But I sewed out of necessity not pleasure. It was only when my sons were in college and THEIR girlfriends thought it was great that I took pride in it. In my step-family it was considered cheap to give a gift home made. My girls love them.
    I am just a little older than you are. My Mom was a fantastic seamstress and made all of my clothes. Noone cared where anyone's clothes came from as long as they had clothes. This is probably because I lived in a rural farming area, and most people were just trying to survive. When I was in high school I was really excited to buy my first dress from a store. Boy, was I disappointed!!! That dress was not as nice and did not fit as well as the dresses that My Dear Mom made. My Mom passed away 10 years ago, and I find it almost impossible to get clothes that fit. One of the many things I miss about my Mom. She was the best person I have ever known.
    Sadiemae

  21. #121
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    Our DGD's live in Illinois, 1 1/2 & 4 1/2...we live in Alaska. Needless to say we don't see them enough..BUT -- When we visit the 4 1/2 yo and I have made chocolate chip cookies and M&M cookies for the last 2 years. It has been great. She remembers us making the cookies and we can talk about it on the phone or Skype and remember how much fun we had. A great way to keep in touch. The first time she cracked an egg it ended up on the floor..oh, well

  22. #122
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    Would love to be around them more so we can quilt together

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae View Post
    I am just a little older than you are. My Mom was a fantastic seamstress and made all of my clothes. Noone cared where anyone's clothes came from as long as they had clothes. This is probably because I lived in a rural farming area, and most people were just trying to survive. When I was in high school I was really excited to buy my first dress from a store. Boy, was I disappointed!!! That dress was not as nice and did not fit as well as the dresses that My Dear Mom made. My Mom passed away 10 years ago, and I find it almost impossible to get clothes that fit. One of the many things I miss about my Mom. She was the best person I have ever known.
    That is such a sweet thing to say about your mom. My mom died 4 years ago. One of my favorite memories of her is that every year all three of us girls had new dresses waiting Easter morning. She would sew all night long to get them done. That stopped when she remarried because there were so many of us then. BUT...

    When mom remarried we moved to a different school (just 15 miles apart). It was a different world. When I was in the seventh grade another girl recognized the pattern of the dress I wore and asked if my mom made it. I said that she had not but admitted finally that I had and begged her not to tell anyone. This girl couldn't understand why I wouldn't want others to know. I had learned that lesson well already. I sew for my pleasure and because what I make fits me better but I still get nervous if someone asks if I made it.

    Everyone's stories about baking reminds me my DIL went home with a college roommate. No one in her family had ever had home made cookies. They always got them from a bakery. At the wedding reception the room mate's mom said to me, "Jane says you made all the dresses and cooked the rehearsal dinner. Where did you learn to do that? I can't even sew on a button or boil water." How do these people live????

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryLane View Post
    At the wedding reception the room mate's mom said to me, "Jane says you made all the dresses and cooked the rehearsal dinner. Where did you learn to do that? I can't even sew on a button or boil water." How do these people live????
    Take out, for one. And most of the clothes you buy these days aren't worth the time it would take to repair them. Not a day goes by that I am not grateful that my mother and grandmother took the time to encourage my interest in and help me learn to sew and cook.
    "Children are likely to live up to what you believe of them."
    ---Lady Bird Johnson

  25. #125
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    Just read this whole thread. Thank you everyone for sharing your stories. You did a great thing for those kids. Don't be sad, just continue to pass you knowledge and skill on.
    Lisa

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