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Thread: Let's go inside and get depressed and inspired

  1. #1
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    Let's go inside and get depressed and inspired

    Yesterday, a bus load of quilters from Long Island went to the Hershey quilt show. Great show, even better quilts. There was something for everyone, from art quilts, modern quilts, traditional, vintage, paper pieced and everything between. I was blown away by talent and creativity. And then, as a sweet cherry on top there was Sharon Schamber quilt exhibit - amazing, inspiring and depressing at the same time. She is an absolute master of the art and craft of quilting with an unbelievable eye for detail. Her quilts always inspire me to break the mold and try to be better than I am. Depressed, well I exaggerated that part a bit, I did not get depressed simply aware that it will be decades, and may be even never, until I can look at one of my quilts with the same awe as I look at hers. Great show!
    I've got a smile on my face, I've got four walls around me
    The sun in the sky, the water surrounds me
    I'll win now but sometimes I'll lose
    I've been battered, but I'll never bruise

  2. #2
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    That's the way I feel at quilt shows or the State Fair too, but I get so many ideas that the depression about my own skills doesn't last very long
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  3. #3
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    I feel that way when I see all your quilts. I think "why can't I be that talented." I watch the quilt shows and have come to the conclusion they demonstrate with paper because everything trims so neat and each seam fits the first the time.. Oh well, I will keep trying for perfection.

  4. #4
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    Keep quilting for enjoyment, not perfection. I think perfection breeds depression! When I see something beyond my talents, I admire it and if that perfection desire tries to creep in, I tell myself that I am quilting for me, my release, and someday, slowly but surely, I will get better at what I do. I may not get as good as whoever, but I am going to enjoy the journey!

  5. #5
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    There are so many things I cannot do at all, but I still love admiring what others do. Things like ballet and Olympic sports, and piano playing, dressage, violin music, flying an airplane or perfect machine quilting. So I just muddle along with what I can accomplish, sing in the church choir, quilt the best I can, take a lovely walk with a friend. There are lots of excuses for being depressed at what you can't do, just enjoy every little thing you can do!

  6. #6
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    My quilts will never measure up to those at the quilt shows. Some days I get depressed when I see all my "mistakes". I quilt for enjoyment, not perfection. I quilt to leave something behind (maybe) (for my great what ever they may be), to be used and saved in tatters, or displayed with honor. I have to do something with my hands, garden, quilt, rug braid, read, computer games, whatever.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  7. #7
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    While I appreciate the incredible talent that many people have, whether a "professional" or folks here, I try to remember that the quilts I make are for my loved ones and donations for fund raisers. I always try to do my best, and keep in mind that I'm not making them for showing and/or judging. I'm doing it strictly for fun, and am about the least competitive person imaginable.

  8. #8
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    LynnVT...I totally agree with your message, When I think what I don't have....I am training myself to change the thought patterns to what I do have...And, it is enough, more than enough for me.
    When I quilt, I consider each new project as a work experience where I can learn. At 78, I still have so much to learn.

  9. #9
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    I couldn't agree with you more about the quilts at the show. I was there on Friday, and stayed in the area until today. Sharon's quilts were amazing. I had the best time shopping at the fabric stores in the area, and the antique stores in Adamstown. I had an awesome trip, and can't wait to go back.

  10. #10
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    who did you take the bus trip with, i'm sorry I missed it

  11. #11
    Junior Member PAMAR's Avatar
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    I always feel so "inadequate" when I view the quilts at quilt shows. I will never be that good no matter how hard I try.

    But, my family thinks I am the world's best quilter and treasure the quilts I have made them - less than perfect seams and all.

  12. #12
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    SS is a perfectionist for the perfectionist! My DD has the same birthday as Sharon Schamber (day and month) and she is a perfectionist in every thing she does (makes me crazy watching her do something ) If only she would love to quilt she would be an award winning quilter in no time. LOL
    Got fabric?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sideways's Avatar
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    I was lucky enough to be near Sharon's quilts when she was there answering questions. It was a mini lecture and quite delightful. She is a very talented artist and gives everything to her craft. I admire her skill and talent but recognize that she is an artist and therefore she thinks differently from me and sees the world in a different way.

    I know I could never do what she does and that's ok. Don't be depressed, we are all talented in our own special ways.
    Never met a scrap of fabric or vintage sewing machine I didn't like!
    Many a lost and lonely vintage machine has found a home with me, 26 and------ uh oh lost count, who is counting anyway!

    Susan

  14. #14
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
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    There's no denying the talent of someone like Sharon Schamber, but I think no matter how "good" we get, we'll never be able to view our own work with the same awe as someone else because we look at our own work and see all the flaws we KNOW are there. Perfection may not be an achievable goal, but we can always strive for improvement. The closest I come to being "wowed" by my own work is when I look back and see how far my skills have come. If I can constantly learn and improve and still have joy in what I do, then I guess I am doing pretty well.
    www.makeminepatchwork.etsy.com
    "Piecin' a quilt's like livin' a life...The Lord sends us the pieces, but we can cut 'em out and put 'em together pretty much to suit ourselves, and there's a heap more in the cuttin' and the sewin' than there is in the caliker...I've had a heap of comfort all my life making quilts, and now in my old age I wouldn't take a fortune for them." (Eliza Calvert Hall, Aunt Jane of Kentucky)

  15. #15
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scraplady View Post
    There's no denying the talent of someone like Sharon Schamber, but I think no matter how "good" we get, we'll never be able to view our own work with the same awe as someone else because we look at our own work and see all the flaws we KNOW are there. Perfection may not be an achievable goal, but we can always strive for improvement. The closest I come to being "wowed" by my own work is when I look back and see how far my skills have come. If I can constantly learn and improve and still have joy in what I do, then I guess I am doing pretty well.
    Amen to that! I wholeheartedly agree.

  16. #16
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    There are so many things I cannot do at all, but I still love admiring what others do. Things like ballet and Olympic sports, and piano playing, dressage, violin music, flying an airplane or perfect machine quilting. So I just muddle along with what I can accomplish, sing in the church choir, quilt the best I can, take a lovely walk with a friend. There are lots of excuses for being depressed at what you can't do, just enjoy every little thing you can do!

    Many years ago before there were quilt shows, I put a quilt into a sort of "fair" called the Big E. It won a blue ribbon. So years later when they started having quilt shows, I entered one I was very proud of. I went to te show and walked up and down every aisle and never noticed my quilt! It was there but totally overshadowed by the "masterpieces". So the question was did I want to continue to make quilts which I enjoyed and hop from quilt to quilt or did I want to spend a year or more working on one "perfect" show quilt? A no brainer for me. I could not bear to work one just one quilt for a year or more. I would feel like I was missing out on all the others I could be making. So there!
    Debbie
    Machine It

  17. #17
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    I never look at the quilts. Only if color usage catches my eye. I go for the notions, patterns and fabric. I'd far rather see antique quilts - worn and made with love - than someone trying to win a prize or pander to the quilt police or fashion. I don't care for heavy all over quilting.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Stitch124's Avatar
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    As a new quilter, matter of fact, I don't consider myself a quilter, I just sew fabric together, but my family and friends think I know how to quilt, so I continue on this journey. I love every second I'm at the cutting table and sewing machine...I wish I could do it 18 hours a day....but I still work fulltime outside the house and babysit 2 nights a week and most weekends so I don't get to quilt as much as I'd like. I love the anticipation of which project to start next and always seem to want to be in a hurry for some reason. Not sure why that is. Anyway, I love the process making the quilt probably more than the actual finished quilt, mistakes and all!!! Enjoy the journey...

  19. #19
    Senior Member Tudey's Avatar
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    Every time I go to the Pacific International Quilt Fest, I feel the same way. I am amazed by the talent of so many and in the same breath, I wonder what made me think I was a quilter! But then, it strengthens my resolve to ever improve my craft.
    Who needs therapy? I quilt!

  20. #20
    Super Member cpcarolyn's Avatar
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    I am inspried by the quilts I see at shows. But I accept my limitations and know that I will never be that good. I just do my best and enjoy the process. I wonder if the makers of these beautiful quilts look at their work and see mistakes as I do in mine.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    There are so many things I cannot do at all, but I still love admiring what others do. Things like ballet and Olympic sports, and piano playing, dressage, violin music, flying an airplane or perfect machine quilting. So I just muddle along with what I can accomplish, sing in the church choir, quilt the best I can, take a lovely walk with a friend. There are lots of excuses for being depressed at what you can't do, just enjoy every little thing you can do!
    I have bookmarked this thread. It so speaks to the way I feel. I'm forever lamenting over my imperfect quilts. I know I've come a long way but have such a long way to go and a short time to get there! I'll be 70 in January.
    Molly O

  22. #22
    Senior Member Bneighbor's Avatar
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    We are our strictest critic. When I go to "professional" quilt shows, I am in awe of being in the same room with such fantastic quilters. But I also know there may be something that I do that they may not do as well as I do. As long as we work at our passion with the idea that we can always do better, but not to stress if it is not on the project we are currently working on. I have learned so much from everyone here. Sometimes I may not execute it correctly, but I try. I do not believe in "heirloom" quilts. If a quilt is in a closet, who knows about it. My quilts are used, have memories, and are enjoyed. That, to me, makes it an heirloom. We have so much to learn, and to share.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    Yesterday, a bus load of quilters from Long Island went to the Hershey quilt show. Great show, even better quilts. There was something for everyone, from art quilts, modern quilts, traditional, vintage, paper pieced and everything between. I was blown away by talent and creativity. And then, as a sweet cherry on top there was Sharon Schamber quilt exhibit - amazing, inspiring and depressing at the same time. She is an absolute master of the art and craft of quilting with an unbelievable eye for detail. Her quilts always inspire me to break the mold and try to be better than I am. Depressed, well I exaggerated that part a bit, I did not get depressed simply aware that it will be decades, and may be even never, until I can look at one of my quilts with the same awe as I look at hers. Great show!
    No one EVER looks at their own quilts with awe.

  24. #24
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Sounds wonderful!!!!

  25. #25
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    There are so many things I cannot do at all, but I still love admiring what others do. Things like ballet and Olympic sports, and piano playing, dressage, violin music, flying an airplane or perfect machine quilting. So I just muddle along with what I can accomplish, sing in the church choir, quilt the best I can, take a lovely walk with a friend. There are lots of excuses for being depressed at what you can't do, just enjoy every little thing you can do!
    Amen! And to be honest - I don't know if I really want to put that much effort and stress into 1 quilt, what would take me years to accomplish, I could enjoy so much more.
    God Bless Quilters and Sewers
    Marti

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