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Thread: Marking on a quilt

  1. #26
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I read about some kind of disappearing pen that disappeared, but somehow the marks came back again later.
    I wonder what kind it was. The only one that I had return was the blue. I ironed it before I dampened it to remove. I have also read that if you put a little baking soda in a spritz bottle with the water, it will help to get rid of the marker. I did try it and I think it did help. Just remember don't iron the water soluable pen.

  2. #27
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I read about some kind of disappearing pen that disappeared, but somehow the marks came back again later.
    I wonder what kind it was. The only one that I had return was the blue. I ironed it before I dampened it to remove. I have also read that if you put a little baking soda in a spritz bottle with the water, it will help to get rid of the marker. I did try it and I think it did help. Just remember don't iron the water soluable pen.
    Good to know. I ironed before I marked on it and I will definitely make sure I continue that way. This was a dritz quilting pen

  3. #28
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I read about some kind of disappearing pen that disappeared, but somehow the marks came back again later.
    I wonder what kind it was. The only one that I had return was the blue. I ironed it before I dampened it to remove. I have also read that if you put a little baking soda in a spritz bottle with the water, it will help to get rid of the marker. I did try it and I think it did help. Just remember don't iron the water soluable pen.
    Good to know. I ironed before I marked on it and I will definitely make sure I continue that way. This was a dritz quilting pen
    I think that is the kind I used too.

  4. #29
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Well I went to Joanns yesterday and they really had a poor selection of choices. I ended up buying a disappearing pen. Worked great on all the white fab and areas with white. But on the black fab it doesnt show up at all. It is purple and I thought it might but no go lol. If I get a chance this weekend I may go to my lqs and see what they have. I may try the chaco liners. Several people seem to like those. Thank you for the help ladies
    Is the purple marker dissappearing ink?
    Yeah it is. It said it would disappear within 24-48 hours. Its been about 20 and every single mark is gone! It also said it would come out with water. I tried that too. Worked like a charm!
    My problem with that is is I get busy with something and do not get right back to it. It is gone and I have to remark everything again. I like the Pilot Friction pen you buy at Walgreens or Office supply . You mark it and when you are done press the marks with a iron and poof, they are gone.
    I might try this. Would it mark on black? And is it just a regular ink pen? I know pilot makes several kinds. Is the friction with the rest of the pens?

  5. #30
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    I read about some kind of disappearing pen that disappeared, but somehow the marks came back again later.
    What?!? Came back? NO! That is not what I want to hear lol

  6. #31
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsister63
    Blue painter tape works great for straight lines. Becareful with disappearing pens since they can be finicky depending on the weather. I tried once and first it disappeard too fast and they not fast enough. I use dressmaker chalk avaliable at Joann's and that come out easily but not make a fine line. Am taking a FMQ class soon so will post what teacher recommends.
    I would love to hear what your teacher recommends! thanks!

  7. #32
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I teach FMQ and I don't recommend marking. That's why it is free motion. What I tech my students is how to think your design ahead of time, practice with paper and pencil, or with fabric scraps on the machine with needle but no thread. You see the holes and can see what it will look like. I do recommend to mark straight lines. Otherwise they never come out straight. Others have given great recommendations. No matter what I suggest you test your technique before you do your quilt. Try to do it under the exact same conditions to make sure it will work for you. No technique will work for every fabric every time, so test it before you use it on your quilt.

  8. #33
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maride
    I teach FMQ and I don't recommend marking. That's why it is free motion. What I tech my students is how to think your design ahead of time, practice with paper and pencil, or with fabric scraps on the machine with needle but no thread. You see the holes and can see what it will look like. I do recommend to mark straight lines. Otherwise they never come out straight. Others have given great recommendations. No matter what I suggest you test your technique before you do your quilt. Try to do it under the exact same conditions to make sure it will work for you. No technique will work for every fabric every time, so test it before you use it on your quilt.
    Thanks Maride. I appreciate the advice. I am making a qayg. the type where you make the block and then sandwich and quilt each block. I am pretty new to quilting. Well honestly extremely new. It is a quilt for me so each block I keep trying different things. Just a lot of practice basically. I had a stencil that I wanted to use so I bought the pen to trace that on. I figure if I screw up too badly it is only a 14 in block and I can either just toss one or rip it out. i have only done a few blocks so far. The last few were fmq but I am having a hard time figuring out what "right" is suppose to look like. Some of my stitches are still ending up way too big. Thanks for the tips. Anything else you can suggest would be greatly appreciated

  9. #34
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Well I went to Joanns yesterday and they really had a poor selection of choices. I ended up buying a disappearing pen. Worked great on all the white fab and areas with white. But on the black fab it doesnt show up at all. It is purple and I thought it might but no go lol. If I get a chance this weekend I may go to my lqs and see what they have. I may try the chaco liners. Several people seem to like those. Thank you for the help ladies
    I found them with all the pens. One store had them the next one didn't. I went to Staples they had a set of 3 blk, red, blue and I paid 5.50 for all three. Paid 4.00 for one at the ,quilt show.
    Is the purple marker dissappearing ink?
    Yeah it is. It said it would disappear within 24-48 hours. Its been about 20 and every single mark is gone! It also said it would come out with water. I tried that too. Worked like a charm!
    My problem with that is is I get busy with something and do not get right back to it. It is gone and I have to remark everything again. I like the Pilot Friction pen you buy at Walgreens or Office supply . You mark it and when you are done press the marks with a iron and poof, they are gone.
    I might try this. Would it mark on black? And is it just a regular ink pen? I know pilot makes several kinds. Is the friction with the rest of the pens?

  10. #35
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Guess there was not enough room above for my comment. Yes, they are with the pens. One store had them and the next one didn't. Went to Staples and they had them 3 for 5.50. one red one blk and one blue. We paid 4.00 apiece for them at the quilt show before we found them at the store for half the price.

  11. #36
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    i use a regular #2 pencil....There are times that i can't see it, but those are the times i chose to quilt in a straight line and mark it w/ masking tape.

  12. #37
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    I took a class from Sharon Shamber, who LOVES the Pilot Frixion pens. We did this in class, amazing how a hot iron makes it totally disappear.
    She also warned that the pounce pad isn't recommended if you have a newer computerized machine. She dont' like it at all, as the powder of the chalk will get into your machine.
    She also gave another tip about using mineral oil on ALL thread, metalic, cotton, silk (her favorite). She places the oil into a jar, drops the whole spool into it, in a few seconds removes it and wipes it off and starts sewing including filling the bobbin don't forget. Stops breakage, smoother stitching, no static of friction. she also recommends the bobbin discs (little white disc you place in the bobbin case)prevents static and jumping. I'm going to post new and share a few tips for you from her...she's won a lot of awards, wonderful to learn from.
    http://www.sharonschamber.com/Home%20Page.htm

  13. #38
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    There are different quilting stitching... and we think "stiple" means the
    squiggly small lines that won't touch each other.
    Micro Stipple is no open space more than 1/4"
    Stipple is no more than 1/2" space
    Background is 1" space between stitching
    Allover is 2" space
    Edge to Edge (pantos) is 3-4" space
    Meander is 6-8" space (should be used for Charity quilts)
    Crap is loose stitching like a store bought bed comforter.
    If your a long arm quilter, and someone asks you to practice on their quilt...
    you don't practice, it's all work the same.
    Explain these stitches, and have mini samples of these on actual variety of
    blocks and plain fabric, so they can see the difference and how the stitching
    would flow in a block (make a sample of asst. most common blocks, log cabin,
    flying geese, 9 patch, etc).
    Have a contract signed with your quilt owner, so she has picked the type of
    quilting she wants, and charge accordingly...make sure she knows the charges you
    placed to each type of stitch work (size).
    Some charge by square inch, most common is 1-1/2 cents/sqin, and some charge by
    the hour, and literally will keep track of each 15 minutes or hour they have
    worked. If your hiring, ask if they keep track on a tablet the time they work
    on the quilt. You do not pay/get paid, for "thinking" time of what to do, but
    actual working/stitching time.

    Make sure YOUR quilt when taking to a long arm quilter, is "fixed".
    Clip all loose threads front AND back. Square up each block before you sew them
    together, and in stages of your quilt, and sashing & borders kept even/squared
    up. Pin borders on from middle to ends (NEVER end to end). And press your
    seams so they do not bunch up. If you are finished, and you find the backside
    has bunched seams, repress WITH STARCH to change the direction of seams. Set
    seams before pressing to one direction or another, run the iron down the stitch
    line, then fold the seam over and press again. STARCH IS GOOD.

    Quilters will charge to pre-press, loading time avg. 1 hr putting your quilt on
    the machine, the more problems it has, the longer.
    Custom work (fancy stippling, feathers, details) COSTS! Either hire for edge to
    edge or pantos work, or be prepared to pay dearly for detailed work. Long arm
    quilters, your time is money, if you are uncomfortable, just say NO.

    Ladies, a 60"x60" quilt, when you add a 10" border, you've doubled the square
    inches of your quilt, expect to double the price also.
    Quilters, you can do 3x(60"x60") quilts in the same time as 1(100"x100"king)
    quilt.

    When your quilting, your own or professionally, divide your quilt into those
    folded quilt zones, and set goal/accomplish/repeat, and you'll finish in a
    timely manner. Why practice on a quilt you've spend precious time and money on
    quality fabric, to piece this lovely top.... practice on plain fabric folded
    into quiltable zones, or on a crap basic quilt you'll donate for charity.

    Hope these notes help... also a good place for "practice" and books/DVDs is "skillbuilders" and you can find it all at
    https://www.ericas.com/quilting/tools/skillbuilder.htm]https://www.ericas.com/quilting/tools/skillbuilder.htm[/url]
    It's best to practice and learn on something else before trying on your pretty quilt top.

  14. #39
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    Quilter's often "settle" for the lower end fabric, but have hundreds of yards in
    their home stash. Don't settle for a lower end fabric for price, only to stock
    pile it in your stash. Use up your stash, or donate it for charity quilts, or
    sell it on ebay. Then buy quality fabric (no matter where, brand names that
    "feel" firm, not flimsy, can't see hand through fabric when looking up at the
    lights). Now, do a project and finish the project before starting the next
    project.
    Ok... we take classes, learn from our quilt guild, and attend retreats full of
    classes, and end up with UFOs. Notice your calendar, the space between a class
    or next event, use that time to finish these projects you've started in a class.
    ALWAYS go home from a class or retreat, and work on your projects ASAP within a
    few days that first week, before you forget what you've learned, and get
    frustrated and it becomes a perminate UFO.

    Left brain people "filing" logical, orderly.
    Right brain people are "creative".
    so, that means that I have to struggle and teach my brain to shut up and allow
    some creativity to flow... can we teach an old dog new tricks?

    ***When we quilt, we should fold the quilt top in half lengthwise (vertical) and
    use a wall paper roller to gently press in a fold/seam/line. Then fold each
    half in again (backwards to the first fold), so it be like an acordian fold, and
    roller press that line also.
    Now do the same fold in half width wise (Horizontal), and again into forths.
    Now you have a 'grid' and that is where you break down your quilting pattern.
    NEVER not even on a long arm (free style), quilt from edge to edge. The long
    arm computerized systems will do this with the all over pattern, but if your
    preprograming blocks & sashings, then do it in this same way.
    Within this grid, divide (mentally) the block into thirds.
    2/3 of this space will be your 'pieced' work, and feather's you quilt stitch.
    1/3 third of this space shohuld be background, stipple or tiny stitched
    (down-matted). This way 2/3 space has loft, 1/3 is flat, creates demension.

    Mix texture, such as feathers with diagnal lines, or horz/vert lines, or echo
    stitching or 'rays' that point to the place you want noticed.
    even in the 1/3 space, divide it up and use many forms of tiny patterns to
    matt/finish that area (divided and keep each pattern in an area).
    At quilt shows, don't just take a photo of the whole project, also step in close
    and take several photos of their quilt-stitch work for ideas.
    You can finish a quilt (squared off zone by zone from the folded top), on a
    domestic machine as long as you can roll the bulk of it under the machine..often
    queen & king won't fit, most of the newer machines will fit a queen.

    (done)"Juke" is a work horse of a tiny machine, low cost, make sure feed dogs can
    drop, or if your using your Juke only for domestic machine quilting, have the
    feed dogs disengaged. Most small machines are not heavy enough, and they
    bounce, and often we complain about the tables in classes or our guild location.
    But a heavier machine will not bounce on any table.
    (I have Baby Lock Audry & my girls have Denim Pro, and they are wonderful light
    weight machines, but they will bounce some, not as much as some models).

    More notes, I'm looking... anything to help someone starting.

  15. #40
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    If your board doing a quilt... others will be board looking at the quilt,
    especially judges.
    Balance not perfection, beauty is not perfect.

    Remember the 2/3 rule, when you have a 9-patch, a churn dash, a log cabin,
    doesn't matter what the pieced block is, you can visually divide that into 1/3s,
    the pieced work is 1/3, on a 9 patch the background squares within those 9, 4
    are background, so let the 5 focus squares pop. When feather stitching a log
    cabin, stitch on the dark side to highlight. NEVER quilt the center square of a
    log cabin block, that is your focal point.

    (done)When your the quilter, ask the customer what shows up for her. It's different
    with everyone, if she notices a color or block, make sure that you 'don't' touch
    that area, let that area 'loft' and stand out.
    Stitch down the remaining areas. We had a quilt of 3 main colors, and half the
    room noticed the green the other half noticed the rust.

    The 2" sashing around your quilt body before your outer border, this area should
    be very lightly quilted, nothing heavy, let it loft to frame the quilt.

    Rule of Thumb... any space larger than a thumb, should have some quilting in it,
    even corner squares (usually in your sashing) can be stitched either diagnally,
    or X stitch the square. If you put diamonds in the sashing, you can stitch in
    ditch to let them loft.

  16. #41
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    Feathers should ALWAYS stitch "clockwise" direction, if making waves of feathers
    or circles of feathers or feathers following around the border, have them
    flowing clockwise. And ALWAYS give your feathers a border, draw a line away
    from your stem line, and run your loops out to that line to create your feather.
    Also, leave a little border between the feather and the 'ditch' of the pieced
    block, this allows the feather to pop/stand out. When creating feathers use 3
    sizes in the loops, this is called Frackle/a repeated pattern. When doing
    circles, the largest circle divided by 1/3s this is the sizes of the 3 circles
    you should use for fill space (which is stipple). Circles always go to the
    left, never back and forth like a figure 8. And if your circle isn't perfect,
    do NOT restitch it 2-3 times trying to make it a round circle, just move on.
    ALWAYS stop at a beginning point, never the middle of a circle or feather loop.
    And always work back to the beginning before the next loop.

    When using a contrasting thread or varigated thread, you must be more accurate.
    Blended threads are more forgiving.

    Judges will notice the border/binding and backing even more than your piece
    work. Break up one large border feathering with caviots (diamonds or swirls) to
    make it interesting.

    When stitching "rays" always stitch the center, then the outer two, then the
    inner lines.

    Decide the width of your "echo" stitching, by using the foot, either inner or
    outer circle width from the needle.

    Never mark a quilt with chalk, these new Frixion pens work beautifully,
    disappear completely with the iron. The pens are from 'Pilot', found at Office
    Depot or Office Max or Staples.

    When quilting, do your "free motion" stitching FIRST, then do your ditch work
    frame stitching... this is opposite of what most have been taught, but keeps
    quilt from puckering.
    Stitch from the center out on blocks, and always one continuous line following
    back to the beginning over stitches, why using an embroidery ball needle is
    important, it won't cut threads like quilting sharp needles do.

    I had learned before to do ditch stitching first...but what she taught made sense, and hey, she's the one winning awards, I paid to learn, right.

  17. #42
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    There is a "slider" plastic with a needle hole, put this on your machine,
    eliminates static, and she uses 100wt Silk thread (22-25 stitch/inch) to quilt.
    3 strands of thread should float through the eye of your needle.
    5 strands of thread lined up next to each other is the shortest stitch you
    should use, and never more than 8 threads wide.
    ***If your using a long arm machine, even the smaller short arms, you can control
    bounce with bags filled with rice, she uses a hand towel stitched shut down
    center & both ends, filled with rice, and sometimes she'll use 1-2-3 bags, to
    eliminate bounce of the quilt and keep it taught. If you have any hand tremour,
    even just from being tired or nervous or a little weak/illness, use weighted
    gloves. They were on sale at JoAnns (bright green items) that help your 'body'
    for sewing, these avg. $20-25 on sale for $3-5.

    She also sewn her own leaders, the width of the area you can stitch on your long
    arm, with a 1"PVC pipe sewn into a sleeve at one end where your long arm table
    clamps will hold onto. Then she uses 'T' pins to pin the leader to the
    bottom/back of your quilt, this gives a more even tension than clamps alone.

    Sharon Shamber always floats her tops. She will load the back fabric, & roll
    all to the back, alwys first. She never presses, she uses Starch, spray the
    fabric, and wait a minute and wrinkles magically disappear. Sew velgro to both
    leaders & use water soluble thread to the other velcro to your backing so you
    can remove the quilt...or best is to finish one quilt first. When you load it,
    measure with tape measure around the leader poles at both ends and middle to
    make sure your poles have not warped or bend, this will distort your quilt...if
    you have flimsy poles, put a thick dowel or PVC through center of your poles, to
    stabilize & strengthen them, or replace with thicker stronger polls.
    Baste the 3 layers (top, batting, backing) to the north pole/top roller. Baste
    at sashing or grid lines you've folded in, horizontally using your long arm to
    baste across. Baste as you go, not the whole quilt, but as you roll it forward
    to each new section.

    Well, I hope all my notes have helped. LOTS of things to think of.
    Deb D

  18. #43
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Deb D
    Thank you thank you thank you for all of the notes! Wow! I have never seen anything so thoroughly explained. Thank you for finding all of that info for me. I bet that was just an awesome class to take. I really appreciate the tips. Definitely something I will be referencing back on. You should start a new thread a repost everything you just shared with me. So much useful info to share. Thank you so much.

  19. #44
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Guess there was not enough room above for my comment. Yes, they are with the pens. One store had them and the next one didn't. Went to Staples and they had them 3 for 5.50. one red one blk and one blue. We paid 4.00 apiece for them at the quilt show before we found them at the store for half the price.
    Drats! I went out to Walmart tonight for two things. A promised gift for my 4 year old (he was a really big and brave boy at the ER last night) and to see if they had the pen. They ended up not having the toy so I had to go to a couple different stores to find it. With the mad hunt looking for the toy I completely spaced the pen! Ahhh guess I will be checking staples tomorrow.

  20. #45
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I have a silver pencil and a yellow pencil. Both are for fabric marking. Not only do you need to worry about how to REMOVE the line, but you also need to check which type of marker shows up well and lasts on your fabric.

    I would suggest that you test on a piece of scrap to see how to remove method you use. There are fabric erasers and there are washcloths and a bit of soap.

  21. #46
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevendebbie25
    or on a crap basic quilt you'll donate for charity.
    :shock: Did she really say that?

  22. #47
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LovinMySoldier
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    Guess there was not enough room above for my comment. Yes, they are with the pens. One store had them and the next one didn't. Went to Staples and they had them 3 for 5.50. one red one blk and one blue. We paid 4.00 apiece for them at the quilt show before we found them at the store for half the price.
    Drats! I went out to Walmart tonight for two things. A promised gift for my 4 year old (he was a really big and brave boy at the ER last night) and to see if they had the pen. They ended up not having the toy so I had to go to a couple different stores to find it. With the mad hunt looking for the toy I completely spaced the pen! Ahhh guess I will be checking staples tomorrow.
    Our WM doesn't carry them. Walgreens does. Good luck. I am sure you will find them at Staples, I did.

  23. #48
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    Quote Originally Posted by stevendebbie25
    or on a crap basic quilt you'll donate for charity.
    :shock: Did she really say that?
    I was wondering that too! Made me laugh :P

  24. #49
    community benefactor stevendebbie25's Avatar
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    I meant a quilt you don't put a lot of expensive fabric into or extreme detail...to me, those are my crap quilts, simple patterns & JoAnn fabrics. Not that the quality of the quilt is crap, or I'm making crap to donate. I really should have used a different word..."more simple" quilts. I'm sorry... over medicated cold here, not thinking.

  25. #50
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevendebbie25
    I meant a quilt you don't put a lot of expensive fabric into or extreme detail...to me, those are my crap quilts, simple patterns & JoAnn fabrics. Not that the quality of the quilt is crap, or I'm making crap to donate. I really should have used a different word..."more simple" quilts. I'm sorry... over medicated cold here, not thinking.
    I got ya :) Just totally made me laugh!

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