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Thread: Monster block - What am I doing wrong? Applique woes

  1. #1
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    Cool Monster block - What am I doing wrong? Applique woes

    My monster block looked so cute sitting on the ironing board after I fused it. It was nice and flat. After satin stitching around it, it has puckers in it. I used a tear away stabilizer on the back of it.

    Do I need to change the machine's tension or make changes elsewhere? I'd love some advice.

    Thanks a bunch.

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  2. #2
    Super Member janedee's Avatar
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    Love the block - great fun - it looks to me as if your tension may be a bit tight not sure how you can get out of this one apart from taking out the stitching which would be a horrible job but I'm no expert on applique using this method - someone else may have a better solution x

  3. #3
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    That is so cute! My guess would be that you needed a heavier stabilizer, but I don't really know, just guessing.

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    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    That is so cute! My guess would be that you needed a heavier stabilizer, but I don't really know, just guessing.
    That would be my guess also. This is one of the reasons I don't like a tight satin stitch when appliqueing. It is really cute though!!!
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    WHERE did you use the stabilizer; just under the monster or on the whole piece of fabric? Yes, the tension could be a little tight but I never use a satin stitch when appliqueing. It might work better if there weren't so many curves and/or small areas to maneuver around.
    Did you make the monster design yourself? It's very cute.

  6. #6
    Super Member HillCountryGal's Avatar
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    Keep in mind I know nothing about this process.
    Wondering if you could carefully cut around the applique, then hand stitch it on a new piece of fabric. Wouldn't that get rid of the puckers?

  7. #7
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I never use stablizer when I do applique. I starch the background fabric until it is just about cardstock and the use the satin stitch. It seems to work for me.

  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Turn it over and press it on the back. It'll be fine once it's quilted.

  9. #9
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    Your block is sooooooo cute. Maybe just loosen your satin stitch a bit and sometimes 2 layers of tear away stabilizer.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the help. I used a tear away stabilizer underneath the whole piece of fabric - figured that was easier than trying to keep a smaller piece in place.

    There are 10 blocks in the quilt so I have time and space for learning. LOL. 5 of the monsters come from a great pattern I got from a QB member. Pattern is upstairs but the name is along the the line of "Planetary Monster Quilt". 4 of the blocks are drawings I made after googling monster and getting some ideas and the last monster was frawn by my 12 year old granddaughter. I'm making changes in several of the blocks so they don't look so much like space monsters.

    I'm going to play around some and try adjusting the tension. Gonna try heavier stabilizer and I'll also try starching the background fabric. I may even go so far as to layer this one block and do some quilting on it to see if it will look ok after quilting. If not, I may take out some of the satin stitching and try to redo it.

    Hope everyone has a great day. I have to go grocery shopping this morning :-( and then will sew after I get home.
    :-)

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    Thanks for letting me know about the monster; I also google drawings.
    Good luck with it all!

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    I admire your satin stitching. It is so smooth and even around all those curves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scakes View Post
    My monster block looked so cute sitting on the ironing board after I fused it. It was nice and flat. After satin stitching around it, it has puckers in it. I used a tear away stabilizer on the back of it.

    Do I need to change the machine's tension or make changes elsewhere? I'd love some advice.

    Thanks a bunch.

    I do satin stitch applique. It looks like the stitch is too dense. The stitch may also be too wide.
    Kat

  14. #14
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    I use satin stitch alot on quilts and use just plain newsprint paper as my stabilizer. I know it's hard on the needle but it works for me. Rarely does it pucker, but I do go slowly. Also I try to keep the stitch 99% on the piece being appliquéd and just the little "zag" stitch goes out onto the block fabric itself. It looks really cute, and once you have pressed it face down onto a padded board, those puckers won't be noticeable.

  15. #15
    Senior Member sept97's Avatar
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    if you're going to quilt it then no need to worry, if not then try a heavier stabilizer. I have an embroidery machine and that happens to me it's hard not to get puckers when doing a dense embroidery

  16. #16
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    It looks to me that you are sewing too many stitches into a fabric that can't take it without a double layer of stabilizer under it. Even then it could be a little tricky. If you intend quilting it it should be salvageable.

  17. #17
    Senior Member calicojoan's Avatar
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    My advise is to use a batting behind your block if your going to satin stitch. If just using a tear away, I would use a reverse button hole stitch or free motion straight stitch. I always us a seam sealer like Fray Chek or Fray Block if using the later 2 ways.

  18. #18
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    I think you would do better using a heavy wash away stabilizer. When you do dense stitching as you have done, tear away stabilizer literally tears away as you stitch. As Scissor Queen said, though, once it's pressed and sandwiched and quilted, the puckers should be all gone.

  19. #19
    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Yes, batting is a good way to go. I did a block of the month called Stitcher's Garden. We used many of our fancy stitches and different feet. You still layer it with batting the regular way. Turned out great.
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  20. #20
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    It's going to be a wonderful quilt, and the most perfect block will be the one your granddaughter drew!
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  21. #21
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Your little monster is sure cute. I had to look twice though. He is pointing at something isn't he? heheheh!
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  22. #22
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    I am making a quilt where all the blocks have very dense thick satin stitch applique plus machine embroidery stitches. Starch your fabric, use very,very firm wash away stabilizer or a strong paper behind your stitching. I find the stabilizer works a bit better while the paper is of course a lot cheaper. You are trying to get the fabric so strong that it won't be possible to pucker - about the strength of denim. Since you're using cotton, you have to get the strength from a combination of starch and backing. Using temporary spray adhesive to keep the paper on the back of your fabric is a trick that many use but it isn't truly frugal - works great though. Your block is fantastic!

  23. #23
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    I was told once there is a difference between stabilizer and pellon. Perhaps try pellon instead, I know one stretches more than the other. You could also be stitching too tight, too many stitches per inch, perhaps back that down. Perhaps also try a test run with a blanket stitch, I have always had good luck with it, and it lays nice and flat.
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  24. #24
    Senior Member kat112000's Avatar
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    So cute! The one thing I learned was to use a light weight thread in the bobbin. The woman teaching the class said to use a thread called deco bob or lingere (spelling) bobbin thread. Also make sure you have the proper foot for satin stitching.
    Kathy

  25. #25
    Junior Member mycatsmom's Avatar
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    Try using an embroidery hoop. I have basted strips of fabric on the outside of my block if it is not big enough for the hoop. The hoop along with stabilizer should help.

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