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Thread: ne1 use these to organize/store fabrics?

  1. #1
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    http://www.polarnotions.com/

    been racking my brain to try to figure out how to do it less expensively (i guess cardboard isn't acid free).

    call me cheap . . .

  2. #2
    joannl's Avatar
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    Looks nice but a little pricey for me. I'd rather spend the $ on more fabric! LOL
    Jo

  3. #3
    Catherine's Avatar
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    I agree...way too expensive...must be for those quilters that have nothing better to do but make things look nice and neat.. ( do they quilt?)I agree..I'ld rather spend 60 dollars in fabric....there are so many other alternatives to this solution!

  4. #4
    Super Member isnthatodd's Avatar
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    I'm mostly a fan of the dig-thru method :!: That way I get to see what all I have each time I look!

  5. #5
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    Patty-If you like the way this looks and want to do something cheaper then try chipboard. It is like cardboard, but acid free. People use it all the time for scrapbooking. Here is a link to 50 12X12" sheets for $12.00 plus postage. They have 4 available, so you could get 200 if you need that many and could probably get a break on shipping. I have purchased this for scrapbooking and think it might serve your purpose.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/12-x-12-Chipboard-White-50-Sheets-032-12x12-Scrapbook_W0QQitemZ250261697751QQihZ015QQcategoryZ 11791QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

  6. #6
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    Wow, $1.38 for a piece of plastic that is 5% smaller than a piece of paper is more than a LITTLE pricey in my book!

    Be aware that chipboard is coated with clay to make it 'acid-free', which is fine for mounting photos, but I would think twice about storing fabric on it. Also, not all chipboard is coated, and not all coated chipboard is treated on both sides.

  7. #7
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    A quick thought (fleeting idea!!!)..what about the corrugated plastic that's used to make signs? Should be able to find it somewhere...cut it to the size you want.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcia
    Patty-If you like the way this looks and want to do something cheaper then try chipboard.
    *slap to the forehead*

    you'd think i would have thought of that. my other hobby is scrapbooking. will check into the acid free status. i've gotten large pieces of chipboard at Hobby Lobby and cut it down.

    thanks!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommaB
    ..what about the corrugated plastic that's used to make signs?
    will have to see if i can find it! sounds like a good idea!

  10. #10
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    Dick Blick has corrugated plastic. http://www.dickblick.com/zz132/00/ I still wouldn't wrap my treasured fabrics around a clay-coated piece of recycled cardboard. Clay, aka dirt. :shock:

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nor'easter
    Dick Blick has currogated plastic.
    i saw that. almost as expensive as the other. oh well. don't really have enough to worry about 'cause i try to use it before buying more (yeah, right :shock: )

  12. #12
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    OK, Victory.com sells the plastic in 12x24 inch sheets in lots of 10, but priced by the sheet. 10-20 sheets are @$1.50/sheet. you cut to get 3 "bolts" per sheet, so with shipping, I can get 60 for $38.80. BUT, 30-40 sheets are $.75 ea. so I can get 120 bolts for $39.92!! 50 sheets @ $.70 ea makes 150 bolts for 45.73!! Of course shipping will vary, but I wouldn't think it will be much different. I couldn't find anywhere on their website that said wholesale only. and its a little difficult to navigate...but..
    Victory.com
    under campaign products and services click yard signs
    click blank coroplast signs
    scroll and click on "order now" under blank plastic signs
    scroll to 4mm 24x12 corrugated plastic (its on the right 3rd down)
    go to 1st little gray "order" box (before the 'you may be interested in these products) you must order multiples of 10. Hope this helps!! I only wish I was that organized!! and sorry for the long post.

  13. #13
    Member Quiltinsolitude's Avatar
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    I went to that site and didn't really see the product - but it sounds like it's plexiglass. Even buying plexi at the hardware store is a tad pricey (would you believe it costs more than glass?!?). Still, if that's what you wanted, I'm pretty sure the local hardware store could cut ya some and it'd be cheaper than ordering from that site, especially since you could buy a few and try them. If you liked 'em, you could always space out your purchases until you had all you needed.

  14. #14
    Jerrie's Avatar
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    Go to the fabric stores and ask them if they have empty Bolt holders they throw them away in the bin. try Joanns that is where i got mine when i was in Florida

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerrie
    Go to the fabric stores and ask them if they have empty Bolt holders
    i have some of these, but it seems there's a problem with acidity - i've been wondering myself why they would use them in quilt stores if that is the case.

    *shrug* dunno -

  16. #16
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    They are cheap and the fabric is not on the bolt for all that long. Perhaps that is one reason many quilt shops sell 'end of bolt' cuts at a discount. :?:

    You can find plexiglas at most glass stores, hardware stores and big box home improvement stores. You'd only need thin stuff and it's pretty easy to cut at home.

  17. #17
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    How about cardboard covered with contact paper :?:

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth Camp
    How about cardboard covered with contact paper :?:
    hmmm . . . have plenty of contact paper left over from another project.

    nor'easter - any thoughts?

  19. #19
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    I wondered about that, too, Ruth.

    I know the acidity level of the adhesive side is too high for book preservation purposes and the like, but you probably don't care about the long-term preservation of the cardboard. So far, I have been unable to find anything that tells me the pH of the vinyl side of Con-Tact Paper or whether the acid from the adhesive will leech through to the front. I'll let you know if I find anything new.

  20. #20
    Super Member 3incollege's Avatar
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    Have you asked the quilt shop if they can save you some empty bolts? I would never spend that much on the those plastic ones. You still have to be tidy using those.

  21. #21
    Super Member DA Mayer's Avatar
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    I tried the folding method that someone posted not long ago, didn't help my fat quarters though. I did buy a small plastic 3-drawer container for my threads. i have a beautiful sewing cabinet but the drawers are long and narrow so makes it hard to find thread. Hopefully this is handier.

  22. #22
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    I'm mostly a fan of the dig-thru method
    Mee too! But I'll have to admit this system does look pretty and would make it easy to see what you have.

  23. #23
    Super Member jbsstrawberry's Avatar
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    Could you simply wrap acid free tissue paper around reclaimed cardboard? (like all those tons of corregated boxes stores throw away every day?)

  24. #24
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    foam-core is cheap - a poster sized board available at most dollar stores. you can easily cut it with razor blad or craft knife.

    Regular straight pins can slip right into it.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    foam-core is cheap
    ya know, michaels had this on sale not too long ago for $1 for the large piece. i got one, but should have gotten more.

    still not sure about acidity, though?

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