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Thread: Need suggestions help!

  1. #1
    Member dancinlady's Avatar
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    Need suggestions help!

    This is my first quilt top finished. I have read and looked over everyone's beautiful work and encouragement. What a wonderful group out here!

    I am doing this for my youngest GD, who will turn 6 next month. Now I am at a lost as to how to quilt it. Since I am such a newbie, just learning to sew, and want to FMQ quilt this with a very easy pattern. Didn't know if I should just do straight lines across the squares, stiples, or around each block.

    I have completed two of these, but I need to finish this one up in a month - her birthday is May 5th. I have a llittle longer to complete the second one, for my older GD.

    Any suggestions woulld be appreicated,
    Milene
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    Milene

  2. #2
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    I also am new so I have been using some of the decorative stitchs on my sewing machine and just cross hatching the blocks.

  3. #3
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    If you have never tried fmq.....this quilt isn't the time to start! I would do a simple STID, any further quilting would only be if the batting showed stitching requirements of 2-4" or less and then would only try a big X in each square. Cross hatching would be nice, but can be very time consuming if you haven't tried it before. Even stippling can be difficult / frustrating until you get the tension just right or teach your hands to move smoothly. If you want to try anything other than straight line stitching on this quilt, I would first put together several practice sandwiches of same fabrics/batting to get the feel of fmq....it takes lots of practice to make anything look like it's supposed to....don't ask me how I know! Your quilt top is very nice....love the colors!

  4. #4
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you need to put together some small (practice) sandwiches with top, batting and backing and sit & practice for a while ---then you can determine what quilting you are able to do on your quilt- even stitch in the ditch takes a little practice- and if you want to free motion you definitly need to do some practicing to get the hang of moving your fabric around smoothly and getting your stitches even.
    cute quilt!
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  5. #5
    Super Member nannyrick's Avatar
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    This is very pretty. I would do a stitch in the ditch or cross lines in the squares. Good luck.
    so many quilts to make, so little time.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLAP View Post
    I also am new so I have been using some of the decorative stitchs on my sewing machine and just cross hatching the blocks.
    I did the same thing with my Sun Bonnet Sue. My Janome 7700 has a stitch that I was able to use across the water that made it look like waves. I actually DID do my first FMQ on the blue with a little white for the sky. I tried to make it look like clouds and it didn't turn out too bad. It is not finished yet...still have to do machine applique around the appliques in the wide border. But I was so proud yesterday when I showed it to someone and they commented about how the water looked like there were waves in it. I FINALLY did something right. lol

    But I agree that practicing first with samples before tackling a the beautiful quilt that you just finished and then look at it and say...WHY did I do that. Mine is just a small wallhanging.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    In my opinion stitch in the ditch is harder than FMQ. Hard to stay in the ditch and looks kind of sloppy to me. If I do straight stitching, I do it about 1/4" away from the ditch. Just please yourself and ou will be happy with it. Granddaughter will love it whatever you do.
    Very pretty, nice color choices.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  8. #8
    Member dancinlady's Avatar
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    Thank you all so much, I guess because of timing for this one I should try straight line stitching, and perhaps use one of my decorative stitches in the border.

    I can't believe how fast you all jumped right in, Thank you so much, I'll be sure to post when I'm finished.

    Milene
    Milene

  9. #9
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    I think it would look very nice with a diagonal cross hatch through the centers of all the squares in the center of the quilt and straight lines maybe 1/2" apart, starting 1/4" into the border. FMQ takes practice,
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

    Kris

  10. #10
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
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    I would do a large stipple.......can't hardly make mistakes with a large stipple but practice on a small piece first.

  11. #11
    Super Member CorgiNole's Avatar
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    You can do some really striking designs using just straight lines. I took a class last weekend from Melody Crust on choosing the quilting pattern for a given top. A few things to consider - who the quilt is for, your skill level, and how soon you need it can direct your decision.

    I agree that SITD can be harder than free motion, my SITD still jumps out a bit, but I know my 3 year old nephew won't hold that against me.

    One other thing that Melody suggested in the class, is when doing diagonals, don't set yourself up to connect all the points unless your piecing is flawless - instead set the seams 1/4 inch to each side - that way if you end up a bit off, your seams can still be straight and it won't be as noticeable. She also suggests edge to edge designs for kids quilts to reduce the number of stops and starts - and that way the ends of the seams can be buried in the binding.

    As a beginning quilter myself, I am taking her advice to heart, especially on the two quilts I need to finish before Memorial Day weekend.

    Have fun, I'm sure your daughter will love it.

    Cheers, K

  12. #12
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I would do echo quilting -- about 1/4" away from the seams. I do a lot of linear quilting -- I love the look of it.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  13. #13
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I would not FMQ this beautiful first quilt! It takes a while to get the hang of it and you really don't want to practice on a real top. I would just quilt diagonal lines thru the squares from corner to corner, extending these lines right thru the borders (use painters tape to get the line extension true). Don't know how big your squares are, but you need to read the info on the batting package. that will tell you how far apart your quilting lines can be. If quilting corner to corner thru the squares is too far apart, then just add an additional line of quilting in between them.

    Oh, and if you have a walking foot, now is the time to use it. I would find the center of the quilt and quilt 4 lines radiating out from the center, making an "X". This will stablize it , then work on additional lines of quilting, from the center lines out. These can be from edge to edge.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  14. #14
    Member dancinlady's Avatar
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    Thank you all, I have been making sandwiches and mocked up my squares so I could try stitching around the insde, but I have never used the walking foot so I will try this also.

    Don't laugh but am I suppose to drop the feed dogs with the walking foot? (you can see how much of a Green horn I am!)

    So much wonderful information and knowledge you all have. Thank you for helping with my questions.

    Milene
    Milene

  15. #15
    Super Member CorgiNole's Avatar
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    No - don't drop the feed dogs with the walking foot as that will defeat the purpose of the foot. The walking foot has grippers on it that mimic the action of the feed dogs to pull the top of the fabric through at the same rate as the backing.

    Cheers, K

  16. #16
    Member dancinlady's Avatar
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    Thank you so much! I still have so much to learn! I'm going to practice with the walking foot a bit then take a deep breath amd just go for it!

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