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Nested blocks, now what?

Nested blocks, now what?

Old 06-08-2020, 08:52 AM
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Default Nested blocks, now what?

Hi, I am making a easy 5” block quilt and it is my first. I nested my seams and sewed the first row to the second row and the second to the third. At this point I have two questions. Do I continue to sew all the rows together and then iron or do I iron in between? I am sewing the rows in opposite directions so it does not sag in the middle. I am also unsure how to iron the row seams all in the same direction or do I fan the 4 point centers? Not following a pattern and found lots of videos on nesting but they all stop at that point. Thanks Beth
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Old 06-08-2020, 09:31 AM
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I nest my seams whenever possible. I like to iron each 2 row joins. Once all my 2 rows are ironed, then I join and iron into 4 rows. Since I don’t have a big ironing surface, this works best for me. If you have a big board ironing surface, you can wait until you get a large section joined.
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Old 06-08-2020, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
I nest my seams whenever possible. I like to iron each 2 row joins. Once all my 2 rows are ironed, then I join and iron into 4 rows. Since I don’t have a big ironing surface, this works best for me. If you have a big board ironing surface, you can wait until you get a large section joined.
Thanks for the answer!! That makes sense. Do you iron the row seam to one side for the entire quilt then? (like the left) Or do you alternate the row seam (left, right, left, right?) Or does it matter?
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Old 06-08-2020, 10:52 AM
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Beth, I alternate the row seams. First row to the left, second to the right, third to the left, forth to the right and so forth. It helps your top to lay flatter and easier for seams to nest. And like Tartan I assemble two at a time as it helps keep assembly a bit under control.
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Old 06-08-2020, 12:06 PM
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One can also press the row seams open. I tend to press to one side or the other, but there is no quilter's law (that I am aware of0 that says one has to press all the seams in the same manner.
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Old 06-08-2020, 12:27 PM
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Thanks everyone! The funniest things tend to be uber important when you start something new—like swishing with the iron — but once you know the reason why it makes sense. Just hard to know when it is important and when not.
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Old 06-09-2020, 05:21 AM
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I do mine like Tartan. I tried sewing several long rows together and then pressing. Didn't work out as good and harder to control the seams.

No one way to do anything, some are easier, neater and better results then others.

Always have to see which way works for you.
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Old 06-09-2020, 05:55 AM
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When I am making a large quilt I put about 2 or 3 rows together and then iron them. Then I work on the next section of 2 or 3 rows. This way it is easier for me to iron smaller areas versus trying to get the whole quilt done and then iron.
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Old 06-09-2020, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
I nest my seams whenever possible. I like to iron each 2 row joins. Once all my 2 rows are ironed, then I join and iron into 4 rows. Since I don’t have a big ironing surface, this works best for me. If you have a big board ironing surface, you can wait until you get a large section joined.
I do this, too: sew all "two" sets together and then sew the twos into fours, etc.
But I press all seams on each strip at the same time. All strips need to be numbered at the top. All even numbered rows seams going toward you as you will be sewing; and all odd numbered rows go away from you.
Start with folding row one to the right over row two. Put this under the needle with all the fabric to the right of the needle. Sew each two together like that, on the right side of the needle. Place row three over row four, etc.
Now lay them out again and place rows three and four to the left, unto rows one and two. Sew these together on the left side of the needle. You will find that, again, the top seam faces away from you and the bottom seam is toward you. It's so much easier to keep the top seam facing the correct way when you can see it.
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Old 06-09-2020, 09:45 AM
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Hey Bethcote, your question is really common and is one I struggle with in terms of pressing to the side, there seems to be so many rules and variations and if/thens involved.

I solve it by pressing seams open. I'm like a hobbit and I like "one rule to rule them all". There are some very rare times when I do press to one side, for example in curves, always easier/better/smoother results for me when I press to the side. Some construction techniques (like one I'm using right now foundation piecing) require/result pressing to the side.

In pressing open particularly, but in all quilting you need to have a small enough stitch length in your seams. If your seams fall apart, or press apart or quilt apart that is due to stitch length, not to being open or shut.
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