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Thread: Newbie questions

  1. #1
    ready2quilt's Avatar
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    Just wanted to find out what exactly is a trunk show?

    And, what is a fabric swap? Anyone ever done one? How does it work?

    Thanks all!

  2. #2
    Senior Member annmarie's Avatar
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    My mother-in-law does a trunk show for local community groups all over the state (Wisconsin). She has a trunk & loads it with MANY things she has made over the years. She pulls them out at the presentation one at a time and explains what they are & how they are done. Sometimes she does a brief demo of the technique.

    An example of a fabric swap would be if you were looking for a yard of fabric with bugs on it & I had it. I would give it to you in return for a yard of something you have that interests me. It can be done on an individual to individual basis or a group swap would be whoever on this forum (for instance) would like to just swap whatever for the fun of it. Could be a theme material or not.

  3. #3
    ready2quilt's Avatar
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    annmarie,

    Thank you for answering. I haven't had the time since I posted to look it up elsewhere.

    They both sound fun to be involved with.

  4. #4
    SandraJennings's Avatar
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    I believe the term came into prominence with the big years of Barnum and Bailey. A reference to the elephants and their ability to carry the show. i know it is certainly associated with those beautiful beasts and their impressive prowess.

  5. #5

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    Does anyone have a pattern for a LARGE pincushion? I'm always misplacing my little red "tomato" ones or they slide behind my sewing machine. :wink: I live in a very small town in northern WI and haven't been able to find a large one here.

    I'll be happy to share something /fat quarters, etc. in return.

    Thanks.

    Brenda R

  6. #6

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    Annmarie,

    I got a reply from you (Noorthern Wisconsin) .but there was no message

  7. #7
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Here is what I did, I took a large tuna can, I stuffed as full as possible with fiber fill, I covered it with a heavy cotton, and glued it with a tacky glue. I put rubber bands around till dry. I also sewed a bit on bottom. Makes a nice big cushion

  8. #8
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    put a sock in it.

    WAIT!!! I got that backwards. :shock:

    I meant: Put it in a sock.

    stuff the toe with fiberfill, then stuff the tuna can Ruth suggested in. Smear glue on the bottom of the can. gather the leftover sock around the bottom of the can and glue it down. (of course, unless you want a reeeeeeeeeeeeely tall pin cushion, i'd suggest you cut off the excess sock somewhere along the line. :lol: )

  9. #9
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    I took a piece of scrap material sewed it together stuffed with fiberfill then took a piece of velcroe attached to one side and put the other half of velcroe and stuck it on side of my machine. I never have to look for it and as I pull pins I just stick them in the cushion

  10. #10

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    Thank You for the ideas for a large pincushion. The tuna can,sock and sticking the velcro to the sewing machine are great. I will get busy and try them. Sounds like an end to my pincushion frustration. :D

  11. #11
    quiltmaker101's Avatar
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    Ruth Camp has started a 3" fabric swap. If you want to participate, you can Private Message others on the forum and get addresses.

    This will be my first fabric swap, so it's exciting to see who answers my PMs and wants to swap with me.

    Look up the page called "Swap 3" fabric" to get more names you can send to.

  12. #12
    Suz
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    I have a stash of woolen fabric which I use to braid rugs (but not in the summer). One of my pincushions is 2" wide strips of wool rolled into a roll held together at the end with a safety pin. The nice thing about the wool is that the pins and needles will not rust owing to the lanolin in the wool. Suz

  13. #13
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    My pin cushion was a gift and I immediately threw out my tomato as I loved it so much. And it's super easy.

    Make a quilt block of your choice as big as you want you pin cushion to be plus enough for the seams. Mine is a beautiful log cabin on the front with matching solid on the back. Sew on 3 sides. Stuff full of batting or polyfill or whatever. Handsew shut.

    I like it because it's so big I never lose it. It fits right into my sewing cases. I also like it because it's not as stiff as a tomato. My hands are kinda messed up so I have to grab the tomato with one hand and pull out the pin with the other. This one I can just use one hand and that way I can use my other one to hold together whatever I am pinning.

    Just a suggestion, I don't know if it would work for your needs or not.

  14. #14
    Marybeth's Avatar
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    Here's another idea for a pincushion that I learned in my beginning quilting class.


    Go to a large discount store or auto supply type place and buy a magnetic parts dish. A round metal saucer, about 4" diameter with a magnet. The pins stick to it so I just toss them in the direction as I sew and there they stay. I keep mine next to my machine. love it

    Bonus- if you drop pins, the dish picks them up :D

    Not expensive- less than $5


  15. #15

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    Indigo Junction has wonderful patterns for large pincushions. They're made out of felt (my current fascination). They have patterns for fruits, vegetables and flowers. I'm sure you'll find them pretty and easy to make up. Just look up their website. Have Fun!
    Louise

  16. #16

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    Thanks. That is a GREAT idea. That way it can be beautiful as well as functional. I'll give it a try.

    Brenda

  17. #17

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    I saw someone in a class with one of those bowls. I wasn't close enough to talk to her and wondered how it worked. Thanks for a great idea.

    Brenda

  18. #18

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    Thanks. I'll take a look. :D

  19. #19
    stay-at-home's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceannastahr
    I took a piece of scrap material sewed it together stuffed with fiberfill then took a piece of velcroe attached to one side and put the other half of velcroe and stuck it on side of my machine. I never have to look for it and as I pull pins I just stick them in the cushion
    sounds good. - it's on the machine but it's not magnetic. Did you know not to put a magnetic pin catcher stuck to the new computer machines? It screws up the computerized system. I don't know if just having it close in the magnetic dish would do the same.

  20. #20
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    I do believe that if you have the magnetic one just close to the machine it'll mess up the computer system. Anything with a computer system in it needs to stay far, far away from a magnet.

    What we've done is make one block of anyone's choice. Pinwheel, 9 patch, log cabin, whatever; fill it with polyfil or spare batting, and put a backing on it. Stuff it full enough and you have a lovely little "pillow" for pins. I have them all over the place. One by the machine, one at the cutting board, and one that floats with me to put pins in and take out when I need them. I just love the little things!

  21. #21
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I guess I'm odd...I use one of those wrist thingies...that way, I don't think about having to carry it with me...its always there (yes, even when I don't want it...I forget to take it off)

  22. #22

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    What a great idea...and a fun thing to look for at flea markets and garage sales.


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