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Thread: Newbie quilting questions

  1. #1
    Member KTDID49's Avatar
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    Smile Newbie quilting questions

    Having never made a quilt yet, I need stitching length info. My machine is set automatically at 2.5 and is adjustable of course. What st length does one use for sewing your pieces together? What st length do you use for your top quilting?
    All so does anyone know where to find, with instructions, how to apply your home photographs to fabric so you can use in a quilt? Thanks to you all for your help and hints. KTDID49
    I AM A CHILD OF GOD

  2. #2
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I usually use 2.5 for piecing unless I'm paper piecing, then I shorten the length to 1.

    For photographs on fabric, I googled "printing on fabric" and got a huge list of websites, videos, and blogs that show how to do it. It all depends on what kind of printer you have and what kind of products you want to use. There's a product called Bubble Jet Set that a lot of my quilting friends swear by. You soak the fabric in it, let it dry, run it through the printer, then (I think) heat-set it. I've not used it myself, hopefully someone who has will come by and explain in greater detail.

  3. #3
    Senior Member skowron5's Avatar
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    I use the 2.5 also. If I am stitching in the ditch or sewing lines to put the layers together I usually go to a longer stitch length maybe 3.5.

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Most of the time these are the stitch lengths which I use.

    Piecing @ 1.8
    PPing @ 1.0
    Quilting @ 3.0 or 3.2

    I may adjust up or down, once I do a test with the variables specific to the project (eg. fabrics, thread, batting, pattern techniques, etc.).
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  5. #5
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Not all of us have computerized machines with digital stitch length settings.

    Use a stitch length sufficient enough to hold the seam together well, yet allow your seam ripper point to fit under a stitch if needed to remove it.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Not all of us have computerized machines with digital stitch length settings.

    Use a stitch length sufficient enough to hold the seam together well, yet allow your seam ripper point to fit under a stitch if needed to remove it.

    Jan in VA
    I believe we all gave her the #s as such, being that she stated her auto-default was 2.5.
    I would think she understands it, because of that.
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  7. #7
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    more important for me is to set my seam allowance at 3.5 (a scant 1/4") my block is never large enough if I leave the needle in the standard position

  8. #8
    Super Member faykilgore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Not all of us have computerized machines with digital stitch length settings.

    Use a stitch length sufficient enough to hold the seam together well, yet allow your seam ripper point to fit under a stitch if needed to remove it.

    Jan in VA
    I sooo agree with that
    Fay

    "You can't help that. We're all mad here." - The Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland.

  9. #9
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    I prefer a shorter stitch so it holds the seam better. I also stopped backstitching and the seams hold together just fine. It was hard to stop backstitching at first since I have been doing that for years and years to set the seam. I use the shorter stitch for paper piecing also--makes it easier to remove the paper. Just don't use such a short stitch that it is hard to unsew. Welcome to the quilting community!! Make sure to show us your first project.
    Sue

  10. #10
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    1.8-2 for piecing
    1.4 for paper piecing

  11. #11
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Not all of us have computerized machines with digital stitch length settings.

    Use a stitch length sufficient enough to hold the seam together well, yet allow your seam ripper point to fit under a stitch if needed to remove it.

    Jan in VA
    That's thinking ahead... can I rip the stitches out!! Did that twice already today...

  12. #12
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    2.0 for me

  13. #13
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    For transferring photos: if you have an inkjet printer, I recommend "Printed Treasures" paper-backed linen. You just insert it into the printer (like paper) and print photos or text right off your computer. Remove the backing, and heat set; then thoroughly submerge into cold water, let dry and press the wrinkles out. I've used it for photos and labels for my quilts. The Bubble Jet is a product used to do the rinse, but not of necessary. There are other products out there, so be sure to READ the directions and know what type of printer you will be using. Good Luck!
    Linda

  14. #14
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leggz48 View Post
    For transferring photos: if you have an inkjet printer, I recommend "Printed Treasures" paper-backed linen. You just insert it into the printer (like paper) and print photos or text right off your computer. Remove the backing, and heat set; then thoroughly submerge into cold water, let dry and press the wrinkles out. I've used it for photos and labels for my quilts. The Bubble Jet is a product used to do the rinse, but not of necessary. There are other products out there, so be sure to READ the directions and know what type of printer you will be using. Good Luck!
    Thank you for this! I was searching for information to do photo transfers for some Civil War quilts I'm making. This quilting board is sooo awesome!!

    Have you washed photo transfer fabrics yet? What is recommended for care after they are used in a quilt? I'm giving the Civil War quilts away as gifts and I want to include washing instructions in case they decide to use the quilt on a bed or for a lap quilt.
    https://quiltdasher.blogspot.com

    I like to make lists. I also like to leave them laying on my sewing table and then guess what's on the list while at the fabric store. Fun game.

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