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Thread: perfect circles

  1. #26
    Senior Member quiltbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whinnytoo
    I use Karen Kay Buckleys 'perfect circle' templates.... they come in lots of sizes and work very very well.
    Baste stitch by hand around template in the 1/4 inch seam allowance and pull tightly to gather. Paint gathered edge with spray starch and press till dry with iron. Ease template out without trying to disturb the turned over seam allowance too much. You can use iron over template plastic like Templar and cut circles yourself if you do not want to invest in Perfect Circles. I have learned this method from Karen Kaye Buckley.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmrenno
    Make a template the size of the finished circle (from cardboard.) Cut a fabric circle one inch larger. Sew a running stitch around the fabric circle. Place the template inside the fabric circle and draw up the thread. Knot it off. Lightly spray with starch. Press. Remove basting thread and cardboard and there you have a perfect circle. You may want to press again. When you get to where you do a lot of these I recomend heat proof template plastic from the quilt shop. You can use it over and over. Good luck with your project!
    Excellent tip, thanks for sharing.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmrenno
    Make a template the size of the finished circle (from cardboard.) Cut a fabric circle one inch larger. Sew a running stitch around the fabric circle. Place the template inside the fabric circle and draw up the thread. Knot it off. Lightly spray with starch. Press. Remove basting thread and cardboard and there you have a perfect circle. You may want to press again. When you get to where you do a lot of these I recomend heat proof template plastic from the quilt shop. You can use it over and over. Good luck with your project!
    I like this method...I had my Son in law who works in a machine shop shave down a set of metal washers that work great. Mostly for smaller circles. If I need a big circle I use this technique.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ChE9UBWA8A

  4. #29
    Member Pbecker's Avatar
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    That's what I do, and they come out perfectly each time.

  5. #30
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    Great bunch of ways of doing the circles must try them

  6. #31
    Senior Member klarina's Avatar
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    I needed this info. Thanks.

  7. #32
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    You can also use used dryer sheets instead of the muslin backing

  8. #33
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    You can also use used dryer sheets instead of the muslin backing

  9. #34
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    I have a set of Karen Kay Buckley's "perfect circles". If I need a lot, I draw around them onto template plastic (the kind you can iron). Then I cut the fabric circle about 1/4" larger, baste all the way around about 1/8" out using quilting thread, pull to tighten, and knot off. I iron this circle, sometimes using spray sizing, cool, and slip the plastic piece out. Then I applique the circle down using silk thread and a straw needle.

  10. #35
    Junior Member larkspurlanedesigns's Avatar
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    Go one stitch at a time and turn your piece after each stitch. Take your time and go very slowly. If you have a speed setting on your machine set it at the lowest speed. Practice, practice, practice!

  11. #36
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    I use the fusible interfacing also to make many shapes of applique. great results.

  12. #37
    Super Member Mariah's Avatar
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    Use a compass. Works for me-every time.
    Mariah

  13. #38
    Super Member Val in IN's Avatar
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    You can use anything round (coffee cup, jar lid, plate,etc) to trace your circle on template plastic, cardboard, freezer paper,etc. to get your pattern, then proceed to use one of the methods above to get and applique your perfect circle. Lots of great ideas here.

  14. #39
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Have you tried the applique interfacing method, or the starch template applique method

  15. #40
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    When I make circles for hand applique, I cut the fabric in a circle larger than the finished circle. With cardstock, I cut the circle out in the correct size. I use needle and thread and sew a running stitch around the edges of the fabric. I pull the threads to gather the edges over the cardboard. I then iron the fabric over the cardstock. (Sometimes I use a little starch or water to hold the shape. Snip the threads and take out the cardboard - perfect circle!

  16. #41
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    After you make the circle, you can baste the shape before permanently attaching. It will keep the placement and shape without getting distorted. I use 1/2" and 1" applique pins - they are wonderful! I couldn't live without them.

  17. #42
    Super Member sylvia77's Avatar
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    I make a template out of freezer paper. I then cut out the circle out of fabric with seam allowance. I then iron the freezer paper onto the wrong side. I then apply glue and press the seam allowance down, works great for me.

  18. #43
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    I go one step further, by actually using a square pieces of fabric (right sides together), drawing my circle on the lighter piece, stitching the circle through both pieces of fabric and than carefully cut a slit in the side that is not going to show.

    It is easier to sew a circle on a square and not have it come out mis-shapped than trying to sew around a circle piece of fabric.

    I than cut a scant fourth of inch around the circle with pinking shears and than I do not have to clip around the circle.

    Cherry in Texas
    Quote Originally Posted by bluteddi
    not sure how u would addapt it but
    1. I make perfect circles but cutting one circle in desired fabric and one circle to match either out of matching fabric of coordinating or muslin.
    2. Place right sides together...
    3. stitch around circle, yes ALL the way around
    4. on wrong side, I cut a small slit ( careful not to cut the desired fabric
    5. clip edges
    6. birth circle thru slit
    7. press right side of fabric
    8. applique or whip stitch to desired area

    Nice round edges....

    I made an entire quilt using this method

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluteddi
    not sure how u would addapt it but
    1. I make perfect circles but cutting one circle in desired fabric and one circle to match either out of matching fabric of coordinating or muslin.
    2. Place right sides together...
    3. stitch around circle, yes ALL the way around
    4. on wrong side, I cut a small slit ( careful not to cut the desired fabric
    5. clip edges
    6. birth circle thru slit
    7. press right side of fabric
    8. applique or whip stitch to desired area

    Nice round edges....

    I made an entire quilt using this method
    This is the way Eleanor Burns does it, but she uses fusible as the second fabric. Then she irons it in place before she sews it down. Works great.

  20. #45
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    Here is a tutorial that may be helpful. This is how I do them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ChE9UBWA8A

    Iron the circle onto the fabric. Then blind stitch by hand or machine stitch around the edges.

  21. #46
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    I do mine just like cmrenno.

  22. #47
    Junior Member DorisPa's Avatar
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    Use a coffee filter for the circle

  23. #48
    Senior Member margie77072's Avatar
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    Hey Gals, great tips for doing circles. I've just gone from being afraid of cirles to can't wait to do some...lol

  24. #49
    Senior Member mariebaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmrenno
    Make a template the size of the finished circle (from cardboard.) Cut a fabric circle one inch larger. Sew a running stitch around the fabric circle. Place the template inside the fabric circle and draw up the thread. Knot it off. Lightly spray with starch. Press. Remove basting thread and cardboard and there you have a perfect circle. You may want to press again. When you get to where you do a lot of these I recomend heat proof template plastic from the quilt shop. You can use it over and over. Good luck with your project!
    thanks for the instructions. I have used freezer paper in the past, but this sounds even more precise :-D

  25. #50
    Super Member vickig626's Avatar
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    This might be expensive for one project but if you happen to have a Babylock or Brother machine, they have a "circular" attachment that sews perfect circles and the sizes are adjustable.

    You would sew the circle, then cut just beyond the stitches. Apply as normal.

    I bought it cause I thought it was cool. Been playing around with different ideas. Kinda fun tool.

    Other than that, I just find something in my kitchen approx. the size I'm looking for and use that.

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