Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: Pieced not quilted table runners

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    491
    Blog Entries
    1

    Pieced not quilted table runners

    I have noticed at craft shows in my area that table runners and pot holders are pieced but are not quilted. Many table runners do not have any batting used at all. Is this common or just in my neck of the woods? I know I could make them much quicker if quilting were not involved.

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,784
    Some people do not put batting in so quilting isn't necessary. The problem with that is unless your top stitch the edge, after washing they won't look very good. I guess they figure the person buying them can iron them?

  3. #3
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,157
    Blog Entries
    2
    The problem with using batting is that sometimes the runner is large enough that when you set the table the plates are partly on the runner and rock. Also you may need to put your stemware/glassware on them, again, batting will make it unstable. The unquilted ones I've seen were birthed, which also is quicker than binding. I guess I'm embarrassed because I've never washed any of mine. They don't stay on the table that long, I just shake them out, roll them & store them until next year. Guess I'm lucky there were no spills!
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  4. #4
    Super Member Bree123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    2,138
    If you're making them for craft shows, don't waste your time quilting them unless you like making $2/hour for your time. People in my area usually buy that stuff as hostess gifts or cheaply presents from little kids for moms and price is more important than quality. If you are making it for yourself or a loved one, I would definitely quilt it. I've done it both ways & also tried a heavy weight stabilizer for my mom since she wanted a sturdier, flatter runner to sit on table all the time (nightmare to see through). The quilted runner really has held up the best by far!

  5. #5
    ro
    ro is offline
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West Islip, NY
    Posts
    657
    Blog Entries
    1
    most of the ladies at my group do not use batting. the reason is the money. they just cant afford to do it. I like to use the batting so i'll make one less quilt and use batting the way it should be made.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,930
    When I make tablerunners I use thermolan...it's thinner than batting...so it's not spongy....I too have seen runners, placemats at craft shows that are just really those 10 minute things....and I really don't see many flocking to buy either.....remember,these do have to be washed and then ironed, although maybe seldom, but I really think most women don't want to be bothered...or don't iron anything either....I see many at the local goodwill store that have been washed and then donated!---- and I must say, I have rescued a few!

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Davenport, Iowa
    Posts
    2,332
    There is a pattern on u-tube for something called the 10 minute table runner. I've seen them in all sizes at craft shows. Quick and easy and great for hostess gifts. Personally prefer mine to be quilted. In my opinion with a 40 to 50% coupon from JAF or Hobby Lobby the batting isn't that expensive.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Melbourne, Florida
    Posts
    1,135
    I always quilt my table runners. I also use insul-brite so I can put hot dishes on them.
    Carmen E.

  9. #9
    Super Member Gail B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Smoky Lake, Alberta, Canada - Coolidge, AZ
    Posts
    1,636
    I always quilt mine using either thermolam or insulbrite for batting. I use my table runners & table cloths all the time so they do need to be washed. I have never had a problem with wine glasses tipping on them.
    I have seen the 10 minute ones at craft shows and questioned the gal that sells them. She said she couldn't afford to make them if she used batting & also said they shouldn't have to be washed because they are only for show. Mine aren't for show so I'll keep quilting them.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    276
    I made 2 table runners (gifts) and used the quilt as you go method, so no quilting shows. I did not use Insulbrite, and will let the recipients know not to use them as a hot pad, so hey do not burn. The next ones I will, however.

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tx
    Posts
    3,411
    Blog Entries
    1
    I made 6 table runners for craft shows and came home with 6 ! They were topstitched, not quilted. Shoppers did not hardly even look. Guess they were not interested. Same with aprons-another vendor had 30 or more, beautifully done, did not sell one !

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,784
    Blog Entries
    1
    when I make 'quick' ones, I do not use batting. But, I will often back them with a flannel so they are a bit thicker and do not slip. This keeps them thin enough that a wobbly wine glass set on the edge will not tip. But I always topstitch (with a decorative stitch in about a 1/2") and usually do a couple lines somewhere around the center (depending on the print) so they stay nice after washing. I only use batting and quilting on ones that are used more for decorative use than for practical use. I do use a very thick batting for runners to be used for Christmas scenes because the decorations sitting in them looks nicer in the fluffiness. Again, if you are selling them, you need to consider your time, effort and costs - can you cover it and make a profit?

  13. #13
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    14,087
    I have been making table runners, placemats, etc. for more years than I care to count, and I have always done at least a minimum of quilting because I feel that they look better. I use Warm & Natural cotton batting, which is a fairly low loft batting, and so easy to machine quilt. If I were making pot holders, I would use a thermal batting, like Ther More (sp) batting. I even made a long table runner for my DS and DDIL's credenza, as the heat from their coffee pot was affecting the finish. You don't need to do extensive quilting on these items, just enough to keep them flat. I also "birth" them, so I won't have to add binding, but I stitch about 1/2" on the outside, which imitates binding.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,930
    My daughter does craft shows as a vendor ( local) and I will throw in a few tablerunners. In past years most things have sold....hers and mine. This year- so far...a stalemate - lots of lookers, touchers, commentors, but very few buyers. Last one coming up in a week....that will be interesting to observe--- hopefully just a few things to pack up and bring back home at the end of the day.....

  15. #15
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    24,461
    Blog Entries
    1
    I've mad a few for myself, mostly as gifts, and I use a thin batting, but I also quilt mine. I don't make them overly wide either, so there shouldn't be a problem with he width over powering the table.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  16. #16
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    18,938
    I have always used Hobbs cotton batting in my table runners.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  17. #17
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    7,661
    Blog Entries
    1
    One of the runners I made was requested to be really flat, and I did not think of just leaving out the batting. Instead I pressed medium interfacing to the back of the top before quilting. No wrinkles when it is washed that way. I hate to iron unless I am making something, lazy I know, but there it is.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    870
    I like to use my scrap batting for table runners and placemats. The iron on batting tape is great for joining the batting pieces. I'm not impressed by the runners without batting.

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    Posts
    1,330
    I also use my batting scraps in runners, but I zig-zag the pieces together. I use W&N. I've never had a problem with glasses tipping, or with hot bowls burning the table.
    Shirley in Arizona

  20. #20
    Super Member annette1952's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Harrison, MI
    Posts
    8,507
    I don't think I would care for the runners without batting unless it was a dresser scarf or something like that. I don't think I have seen one with no batting though so I can't say for sure whether I would like it or not. I know cost is relevant for most of us but I think I would use scraps of batting or make less runners. If you was selling them, then of course you have to up the price & consumers are looking for bargains. Kind of a catch 22 thing. People that don't quilt, just don't get it. They have no idea what things cost to piece &/or quilt or the time involved.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,584
    I have a quilted scarf to cover the top of a TV cabinet type thing with shelves. I used high loft poly batting. I have pictures in frames that set on top and they do not wobble or topple.
    I made a dresser cover without batting and quilted it. It was very hard to quilt.
    I have only made these two and they are mine.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  22. #22
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,540
    I have made lots of placemats and a few table runners to sell. I always use batting. On the Placemats I use fusible batting and birth them and do a zig zag stitch around the edge. They wash real nice. Then on the table runners I use batting (cotton) and quilt some on them and put a binding and they sell real well.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  23. #23
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,498
    The ones I've made for myself I used fleece as combination backing/batting. They worked great as protection from the heat of all the hot dishes for my 6 ft folding plastic table. And yes I did a bit of minimal SID quilting.

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    46
    I always use fusible fleece in my table runners with some quilting they lay super flat and wash beautifully

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.