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Quilt Design programs/tips/tricks

Quilt Design programs/tips/tricks

Old 06-26-2015, 01:36 PM
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Default Quilt Design programs/tips/tricks

I have been designing quilts on paper and using programs like Photoshop for a while, but I know there are programs out there specifically for quilt design that might make the process easier/faster. I was wondering what was recommended (or not recommended, if that's the case!) and if any of the programs have a free trial. I am very computer literate, but I am also way too set in my ways for someone in her 20's! I don't know if I will have to change my process more than I am comfortable with, and I want to make sure I'll use the program before I spend the money.

Thanks for any and all advice/recommendations!
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Old 06-26-2015, 02:01 PM
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I have extensive experience with both vector based and paint type programs. I found EQ7 to be counter intuitive, however, the program is very powerful and worth the learning curve, but Photoshop & Illustrator background doesn't help. I usually start with paper, go to Illustrator to refine, then go to EQ7 to refine the block(s) some more & lay out the whole quilt with borders & colors.
Use the advanced search on the Tutorial board for the string: "Rhonda's Electric Quilt Class". There are 20+ classes. You can get a good idea of the basics from there. Don't know if there are any trials out there.
Quilt in a day usually has the best price by far. She can't advertise it, but put the program in your basket to see the price.
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Old 06-27-2015, 04:03 AM
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Thanks for the tip, that is definitely the lowest price I've seen on EQ7!

Since you seem to have a background similar to mine - would you mind taking the time to elaborate why EQ7 was counter intuitive for you and what features make it worth the learning curve for you?

I will definitely check out those videos. Thank you.
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Old 06-27-2015, 04:10 AM
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You might even go to their website to check out information that is there. There is also a tutorials done by Rhonda located her on QB. I bought the version 3 when I was at Quilt Market in 1995 and have own many versions of this program. There is a simpler version that is called QUILT DESIGN WIZARD. I bought a used copy of EQ7 on eBay for a little over $100. So easy to resize patterns, print out PP patterns and print out rotary cutting instructions. I can't imagine doing any quilting without it.
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Old 06-27-2015, 04:54 AM
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I understand why PaperPrincess says EQ is counter intuitive, but I didn't find it that hard to learn. I have been a computer user since I was in my 20's, and that was a very long time ago, long before the personal computer was around. I can't imagine using paper for designing - just not my style. I use EQ7 for some stage of every quilt. I don't rely on it for fabric requirements (it's too conservative) and I've run across some things it doesn't do well, but for 99% of the things I want to do, it is more than adequate. I also bought Quilt Design Wizard, but I found it too limited.
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Old 06-27-2015, 08:24 AM
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Thank you both for your input!
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Old 06-27-2015, 08:32 AM
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I had an earlier version of EQ and l liked it a lot, especially the automatically generated cutting instructions, but I, too, found it counter-intuitive. It was what I call "PC-ish," because I am a Mac person and I am used to things that flow well. I also like to use graph paper, and that's what I use the most now; I haven't been willing to spend the money on any upgrades or newer versions of EQ.

If you can find an older or used version, you will probably have fun with EQ. I would find myself hard pressed to go out and buy it at full price, though. My two cents!
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Old 06-27-2015, 08:37 AM
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I have been using EQ since EQ4. I have met the owner of EQ and the original code writer, her husband. They are wonderful people. The EQ7 program is huge. Even as an instructor I continue to learn. I design my patterns in EQ. I teach EQ and I love EQ. I did try the Quilt Pro programs. I find them very restrictive. Quilt Pro is a good program for non technical people. EQ has many many many add ons. I can't think of a time that I would not use my EQ program for a quilt. I make my labels in EQ as well. I am a fan because it is a great product and has excellent service. Luann
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Old 06-27-2015, 08:42 AM
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I have EQ 6. I may just continue to learn it as an upgrade to 7 is considerable, and I wouldn't get the manual with the upgrade price. I'll probably hold out for EQ8.

I love it, though. I use it almost daily. I can't imagine designing without it. I am constantly changing colors, designs, etc. with it.

I have been using computers since the late 70's/early 80's (I'm 52) in the form of typesetting machines where I worked as a teenger/early 20's. My husband had a Commodore 64 which I also played with some. That's a long time ago.

I don't find EQ that hard to learn. Mostly it just takes time to sit down and read the manual and use it. It can do way more than I know how to do yet. That's why I've not felt an overwhelming need to upgrade.

Last edited by justflyingin; 06-27-2015 at 08:45 AM.
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Old 06-30-2015, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by justflyingin View Post
I have been using computers since the late 70's/early 80's (I'm 52) in the form of typesetting machines where I worked as a teenger/early 20's. My husband had a Commodore 64 which I also played with some. That's a long time ago.
That's interesting, I used typesetting machines in high school and college. I don't know many people with that experience
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