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Thread: Quilting Classes need hints please

  1. #1
    Super Member sawsan's Avatar
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    Quilting Classes need hints please

    I like and dreemed of doing quilting and stitching classes for girls who R between 8 and 10
    MY problem is that i am not clever enough for organizing such thing
    So do u have any helping idea " Where to begin and how any advice i would be greatful
    Thank u

  2. #2
    Power Poster debcavan's Avatar
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    When I sew with the ladies in the nursing home, I have a 1/8" high strip of blue painter's tape that marks the seam allowance on the machine. It helps them guide the fabric and have straight seams. I do all the rotary cutting.
    DEB CAVAN

  3. #3
    Senior Member jollyquilting's Avatar
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    Something simple like squares, either 5 or 6 inch sqares go together fast and easy, and forgiving. Also the rail fence is fun and only straight seams, although the squares are only about 6" to keep straight when you are starting. Also, teach them to be able to thread the machine and either make the bobbins with the machine or else use a bobbin maker.
    (I wasn't taught to make bobbins and almost quit because I was so troubled) Get one of those klutz gloves to protect those little fingers too. Have fun
    Jo

  4. #4
    Junior Member ambquilter's Avatar
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    I have some patterns that I worked on with my daughter at that age. They are pillows that have heart, house, flower, etc. I don't remember what the technique is called but you draw the design on tissue paper then layer 3 pieces of fabric. You will then pin the paper to the top of the fabric and triple stitch on the lines. The pattern tells you in what areas to cut through the paper and one layer of fabric and in what areas to cut throught the paper and two layers of fabric. My daughter was amazed that she made something so cool looking.

    If you interested in the information PM me and I will look up the patterns. I may even have an extra one.

    Angie

  5. #5
    Super Member BarbaraSue's Avatar
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    This can vary according to the craftiness of your young ladies to start with. You might have to start with basic cutting with scissors for them. jollyquilting's idea of rail fence blocks are easy and allow for color matching if they want. you can increase the strips to make a bigger block, and it will take less blocks for them to have to sew. Or a four patch block can be any size and takes two fabrics per block. It can be scrappy. Charms are good for this.
    You can teach them to strip piece or the block method.
    If you have machines to sew with, you might want to spend time with paper drawings to have them practice guiding the paper to the needle.
    To make lots of quilts, is to have lots of scraps, and I do, and I do.
    BarbaraSue

  6. #6
    Super Member Arleners's Avatar
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    Maybe you could use fabric crayons and have the girls draw pictures on some of the blocks. You then heat set them with an iron. These can then be sewed into the quilt. Then if you just use plain blocks the quilt (or pillow) would still be interesting to the creative artists!
    Arlene

  7. #7
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    Pillow cases are very popular as are simple skirts. Good luck.
    Linda

  8. #8
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    I would start with having them practice sewing straight lines, either by hand or by machine. Then I would give them the precut (by you) pieces to make Feffertem's super easy tissue holders. (Look it up by the Search feature). The girls will have a sense of accomplishment in a very short period of time!

    Good luck!

    Sue

  9. #9
    Super Member sawsan's Avatar
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    Thank u ladies for the wonderful thoughts and thanks for the timing u spare to reply i realy love all what i see and read and talk in this board

  10. #10
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Take some squares , have them sew together and make a pillow ?
    To keep your mind fresh- learn one new thing a day !

  11. #11
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    When learning to sew, my mother had me sew with an unthreaded machine and follow lined notebook paper. That way I learned to sew straight lines. At 10, I joined 4-H and made a skirt and simple vest. I sure was proud to wear it.

  12. #12
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    I don't have any information for you but I do want to wish you the best of luck with your clsses. What a great thing you are doing for these young girls.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  13. #13
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    how about a chicken pincushion?

  14. #14
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
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    Hi, What about working with projects from 4H or Girl Scouts. The leaders of these groups could always use project leaders. I have recently contacted 4H in my county, and will be a sewing/quilting project leader. They do have outlines what the kids need to complete, but they provide these. I love teaching young people to quilt, it will make sure our craft is passed to another generation.
    Mary Fran G
    El Lago TX

  15. #15
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    I started with making an apron--very easy and gave it to my mom.

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    Learning to drive a sewing machine

    If the girls are new to the machine some machine practice on following lines using paper and an old used needle would help. Use a marker to mark straight lines, then gentle curves, squiggles with and with out points and something with circles. I start with a fat marker for the first attempt and then go to a thinner one and then a still thinner one. Going from fat to thin gives them success all along the way. Just remember that if they are new to sewing machines and quilting there is more room for error. Master the machine anda then put it to the fabric. When you don't succeed you're mor likely to give up or say you don't like it without it ever having had an honest try.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Pat75's Avatar
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    I gave my grand daughters a piece of lined paper and had them practice on that No thread in the machine. Then I gave them a bag of scraps that we pressed their choices and sewed on to a sheet of computer paper start ing at one edge and filling it with their choices Made a simple back and stuffed it and they each went home proudly. with a pillowThis took about 3 sessions. THe next step went on to 9 patch and some paper piecing and as their interest grew the blocks became more difficult.
    I'm an obsessive compulsive quilter and batik aholic. I make only king size quilts.

  18. #18
    Suz
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    I had been involved with 4H for 14 years. The first year guilters made a wallhanging using half square triangles. Use the pencil lines stitching on either side along the center diagonal line. Then cut apart to make two blocks, repeat once = 4 blocks. The youngsters can then arrange and rearrange them to suit. Sew the blocks together, add a border, sandwich and then handquilt. Use a marker to show the quilting lines emphasing the importance of keeping the stitches even in size and as straight as possible. AND have them write on the back as in making a label.

    Use the tape or a stack of post-it notes as a seam guide, and have an instructor along side guiding and slowing the machine with their hand on the handwheel.

    Good luck. This is a rewarding endeavor and the kids will love it.

  19. #19
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    To get them comfortable with the machine draw straight lines, circles. Squares and anything else you would like. Then have them practice sewing (no thread) on the lines you drew. Check and see how close they are to the lines and once they master that move on to a simple apron or pillow case.
    Blessings, Debbie

  20. #20
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I am much older than that, but the thing I loved about my first sewing class (about 2 yrs. ago) was that I was able to take home a finished project!
    :-)
    CAS

  21. #21
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    Quilting classes for 8-10 yr old children

    If I was to do it, I would invite the children to an initial planning meeting and hand each one a piece of paper and pencil and ask them to write down what they anticipate learning. So you can be successful in your teachings, this way you get the feeling of what the kids hope for, plus you could find out which ones need the most attention. Good luck, I may just do that in one of our public libraries for our boys and girls.

  22. #22
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    maybe print out some mazes and let them travel through with an empty machine needle?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

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