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Thread: A quilting memory of my greatgrandmother and her sister

  1. #1
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    I guess I can post this since it's quilt related....
    With having so many fires lately and sitting by them, my thoughts have gone back
    to when I was a little girl. My greatgrandmother on my mother's side was "momo
    Ossie" and she lived with her sister, "Aunt Bernice". Momo Ossie's husband died
    when she was younger and Aunt Bernice was never married.
    They lived going toward Baton Rouge, LA, north of New Orleans out in the country
    where there were a lot of strawberry farms at that time.
    I remember going to their house in the fall and winter and they had a fire in
    the living room and their quilt frame was lowered from the ceiling. ALL winter
    long they would make quilts. Aunt Bernice would sew on the treadle machine and
    momo would always be hand quilting while she was sewing or sometimes they would
    both be quilting, mostly in the evenings. There was always a large quilt on the
    frame and in the evenings when they were finished, or when they had company and
    wanted to visit, they would raise the quilt frame up toward the ceiling and tie
    it off over on the wall. It was sort of a cleat I think.

    By spring time, they had made MANY quilts of all sizes and colors. We always
    went there for Easter and many times around this time of year. The folks from
    New Orleans and Baton Rouge would come out to pick strawberries and they would
    go past their house. They would hang their quilts on the clothesline and put a
    sign out QUILTS FOR SALE. They also sold eggs, pecans, jams from local
    strawberries, etc. The "rich folks" from the city would stop and by their
    quilts. This would give them money to restock their fabrics and supplies and
    extra spending money. They were always so happy when they sold a quilt.

    Of course, they made all of us kids one and our parents. I still have mine, but
    some were just worn out with love and use. Momo Ossie lived into her 90's and
    Aunt Bernice lived to her late 70's. After Aunt Bernice died things were never
    the same. Momo Ossie had to move near one of her sons and lived in a tiny little
    trailer next to his house so as to keep her independence right up till she died.
    She always continued her quilting and gave them to family. She always made pecan
    pies up till the end and loved to cook chicken n dumplings and all kinds of good
    food.

    Those have been my thoughts lately and just wanted to share them with you, my
    quilting friends, as I know you have fond memories of your own.
    Thanks for listening.
    Sandra

  2. #2
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
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    What wonderful memories! Thank you so much for sharing them.

  3. #3
    Lady Tapioca's Avatar
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    What wonderful memories to have! Makes one wish we could go back and relive......

  4. #4
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    Those are very wonderful memories! You should write those kinds of things down. I don't know if you have children or not, but those will be the kinds of things they would love to have way down the road to combine with their own memories of you.

    Your post reminded me of these two older woman who live down towards Amite, LA. They have a little stand out in front of their house where they sell strawberries and other goodies, though sadly I haven't seen them there the past couple of years. We always stop and buy strawberries from them on our way back from the Strawberry Festival in Ponchatoula.

  5. #5
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    Perhaps one reason I'm having all these memories come back is because my daugher is about to have my first grandbaby ANY DAY NOW. She's due on Jan. 20, her birthday. Thanks, I will write them down. I have started a journal this year. I haven't done that in a long time.

    P.S. I'm originally from Bogalusa, LA.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelcb80
    Those are very wonderful memories! You should write those kinds of things down. I don't know if you have children or not, but those will be the kinds of things they would love to have way down the road to combine with their own memories of you.

    Your post reminded me of these two older woman who live down towards Amite, LA. They have a little stand out in front of their house where they sell strawberries and other goodies, though sadly I haven't seen them there the past couple of years. We always stop and buy strawberries from them on our way back from the Strawberry Festival in Ponchatoula.

  6. #6
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    What great momories. Thanks for sharing them with us.

  7. #7
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Print these memories out and put them with you other important papers. Your kids will find it someday! :D

  8. #8
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    What a beautiful and meaningful story, Sandra! Thank you for sharing. It brought tears to my eyes.

  9. #9
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    I'm so glad you shared your memories with us. Your recount was really interesting. I love the smell of snuffed out candles and the smell of coal burning stoves, takes me back to my childhood.

    And now I know where you live, lol. I just asked you when I replied to your PM.

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    I've heard a few stories women using the "lower the table from the ceiling technique". Didn't know if it was a local thing or not. Glad to hear it's not. And how wonderful that quilters shared across distances, even "way back when"!
    Thanks!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riebejamen
    I've heard a few stories women using the "lower the table from the ceiling technique". Didn't know if it was a local thing or not. Glad to hear it's not. And how wonderful that quilters shared across distances, even "way back when"!
    Thanks!
    It was a frame that was "old" to them. It was just 4 long strips of wood joined at the corners. I think it had screws w/twist on/off bolts so that it could be taken apart. Then there were ropes/cords going up to the ceiling through hooks in the ceiling and they would pull the ropes to raise and lower and then tie off at a cleat over on the wall.
    I'd love to find one of these old frames. I don't remember how they attached the quilt exactly. I want to say some kind of spring clamps, but remember it being rolled under some. I'd crawl under it and play and look up through to see the light coming through and them sewing.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Beautiful memories!!

  13. #13
    Super Member CajunQuilter2's Avatar
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    Thanks for the wonderful story. I live in Lafayette La. and have visited the plantations between Baton Rouge and New Orleans many times. I can actually visualize what it was probably like for them in the house with the quilt frame.
    Hubby was working in St Marys Ga and we were there for 2 months. We loved the area/

  14. #14
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    What a beautiful memory. As others have said, write it and many others down!!!

  15. #15
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    I, too, find myself remembering those who are gone. How I wish my children and grandchildren could have grown up in such uncomplicated times. How I pray that at some point we can get back, at least in part, to the lifestyle we had then.

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    so neat. Thanks for sharing

  17. #17
    Super Member May in Jersey's Avatar
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    Such a wonderful memory. You told it so well that I could imagine them sewing and quilting in front of thier fire. You must print the story out and start a scrap book with whatever photos of family and quilts you can find. Even quilts that are tattered have a story to tell. Thanks for sharing your great memories. May in Jersey

  18. #18
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    Thanks for taking us down memory lane. What a lovely remembrance of these two women. I hope you have written down more stories for your family and loved ones so they may also enjoy an inkling of what you did.

    Now I have to wipe drool off the keyboard from talk of chicken and dumplings and pecan pie. Ummm.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wvdek
    Thanks for taking us down memory lane. What a lovely remembrance of these two women. I hope you have written down more stories for your family and loved ones so they may also enjoy an inkling of what you did.

    Now I have to wipe drool off the keyboard from talk of chicken and dumplings and pecan pie. Ummm.
    LOL.... You can just look at my waistline and see that I have inherited, and am passing on, the cooking aspect as well. I cook all that good southern food and have a garden and chickens. Thank you all for your sweet comments and would love to hear some of your memories. One friend wrote and said she was sorry she didn't have any. I said, you have made them for your grown children and now are making them for your grandchildren daily.

  20. #20
    pal
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    I loved "hearing" your story. Everybody's right about writing it down. Whenever our whole family is together, the young ones want to hear all about the way it used to be. We're always retelling stories about the family, and when we embellish too much they correct us and tell us how it really was. They want to hear the stories over and over
    again.

  21. #21
    Senior Member sew_lulu's Avatar
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    Thank you for sharing such a wonderful members.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cumberlandquiltchick
    I guess I can post this since it's quilt related....
    With having so many fires lately and sitting by them, my thoughts have gone back
    to when I was a little girl. My greatgrandmother on my mother's side was "momo
    Ossie" and she lived with her sister, "Aunt Bernice". Momo Ossie's husband died
    when she was younger and Aunt Bernice was never married.
    They lived going toward Baton Rouge, LA, north of New Orleans out in the country
    where there were a lot of strawberry farms at that time.
    I remember going to their house in the fall and winter and they had a fire in
    the living room and their quilt frame was lowered from the ceiling. ALL winter
    long they would make quilts. Aunt Bernice would sew on the treadle machine and
    momo would always be hand quilting while she was sewing or sometimes they would
    both be quilting, mostly in the evenings. There was always a large quilt on the
    frame and in the evenings when they were finished, or when they had company and
    wanted to visit, they would raise the quilt frame up toward the ceiling and tie
    it off over on the wall. It was sort of a cleat I think.

    By spring time, they had made MANY quilts of all sizes and colors. We always
    went there for Easter and many times around this time of year. The folks from
    New Orleans and Baton Rouge would come out to pick strawberries and they would
    go past their house. They would hang their quilts on the clothesline and put a
    sign out QUILTS FOR SALE. They also sold eggs, pecans, jams from local
    strawberries, etc. The "rich folks" from the city would stop and by their
    quilts. This would give them money to restock their fabrics and supplies and
    extra spending money. They were always so happy when they sold a quilt.

    Of course, they made all of us kids one and our parents. I still have mine, but
    some were just worn out with love and use. Momo Ossie lived into her 90's and
    Aunt Bernice lived to her late 70's. After Aunt Bernice died things were never
    the same. Momo Ossie had to move near one of her sons and lived in a tiny little
    trailer next to his house so as to keep her independence right up till she died.
    She always continued her quilting and gave them to family. She always made pecan
    pies up till the end and loved to cook chicken n dumplings and all kinds of good
    food.

    Those have been my thoughts lately and just wanted to share them with you, my
    quilting friends, as I know you have fond memories of your own.
    Thanks for listening.
    Sandra
    I have a similar quilting memory, only my grandmother had a wooden quilting frame that was set up in the living room during the winter in their house on the farm, and it almost always had a quilt on it when i got to stay there. It was where I took my first stitch on q quilt my grandma and one of my aunts were tying. I was 4 years old and wanted to 'help', so I was allowed to poke the needle down into the quilt, but had to crawl under the frame to pull the needle all the way through, and then push it back up again. That quilt frame went to town when Grandma and Grandpa moved off the farm, and Grandma usually had a quilt on it...almost always a Log Cabin. My sister now has that old frame, and a couple of years ago, when I went to visit, I thought I'd gone back to Grandma's house, because the frame was set up in her sewing room...with a Log Cabin quilt stretched on it ready for quilting! (The quilt was a friend's, but all of us grandkids did get a Log Cabin quilt from Grandma when we turned 18.)

  23. #23
    Zoe
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    What wonderful memories. I agree with all those who encourage you to write them down, especially for your new grandchild. I am from New Orleans originally, but all my people were Landrys from the Lafayette, Louisiana area. Isn't it wonderful how those lovely quilting women in your family have left you with such memories. They stay with you forever. My husband made my mother and me a quilt frame that hung down from the ceiling. We found a photo of such a frame in an old magazine, and he was able to build one. Whenever my mother came up to Virginia to spend summers with us (when we were posted back to the States), we would lower the frame, put a quilt top in it, and mom would quilt all day. I have pictures of her doing just that. My daughter, who was only ten then, would also quilt as would my best friends. Since the quilt top was pieced by my mother's oldest sister, this quilt has three generations of the women in my family in it. I wish we lived closer so that we could get together in a quilting bee and reminisce. Thanks for such a lovely memory.

  24. #24
    Senior Member nellebelles's Avatar
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    Ah, those are great memorial stories--and a tribute to your families. I think this bears a reminder to all of us quilters: Make sure to document and label your quilts. They truly are part of our family history, and the information about them needs to be handed down, just like the memories in our heads and our hearts.

  25. #25
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Great memories, I don't have any like that, I'm sure my Grandmother probably made quilts, we didn't live close to have many memories of her. My Mom had quilt tops that I can remember, never quilted any with five kids there was never enough time nor space nor money.

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