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Thread: Quilts on hsc/tv

  1. #1
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    Quilts on hsc/tv

    I was watching one of those home shopping clubs on tv yesterday, something I have not done in many years-was hooked on them at one point in my life....anyway they were showing quilt sets. I was amazed how well done these are made.....and the quilting is all machine done and well done. I was thinking they would be those horrors with the primitive hand quilting, but no these were very modern piecing designs, lovely patterns, lovely colors with shams, bedskirts and drapes to match and the prices were slashed and I was really tempted to buy a "set". It was said they are 100%cotton, lovely back fabric on back, cotton batt......all for less that $100.00. Altho I do not make quilts for others for $$, as I watched this presentation I wondered how one who does that can compete with that price. Like I said, one was such a cute combo of colors/design I was really tempted, then I slapped myself!!!!!!!!!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 12-29-2012 at 11:00 AM. Reason: not worldwide friendly

  2. #2
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    But, please remember how these are made....often in slave labor camps overseas. The fabrics are knockoffs, the patterns are knockoffs. ALL of this imported quilts business started in the very early 1990s when the Smithsonian Institution SOLD patterns of our heritage quilts - including those of renowned slave quilter Harriette Powers - to an import company who then started mass producing them in very poor quality and selling at ridiculously low prices. Our American heritage art, on the import market, devalued and mass produced!

    Karey Bresenham who started the Houston International Quilt Festival, started a petition against this (Oh I can't even think of a word for it!) disaster, demanding that no more such items be sold by the Institute, and took it to Congress, where the heinous action was stopped.

    From that point, the overseas manufacturer had to develop their own patterns and print more of their own fabric designs, no longer copying Jinny Beyer's and others designs. Also from that point, slowly the laborers began to improve their quilting skills. But the quality was still not comparable to quilts being produced by individual artists, and their sale continued to devalue to work our quilters are doing in the public's eye.

    If we continue to support this particular importing of quilts by buying them or failing to advise others of this travesty of production, then we can not complain when we find it difficult to sell our own work for a fair price.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  3. #3
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    Oh Jan , you are so knowledgable about these things. I am glad you are here to share what you know. thanks
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  4. #4
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    I was watching one of those home shopping clubs on tv yesterday, something I have not done in many years-was hooked on them at one point in my life....anyway they were showing quilt sets. I was amazed how well done these are made.....and the quilting is all machine done and well done. I was thinking they would be those horrors with the primitive hand quilting, but no these were very modern piecing designs, lovely patterns, lovely colors with shams, bedskirts and drapes to match and the prices were slashed and I was really tempted to buy a "set". It was said they are 100%cotton, lovely back fabric on back, cotton batt......all for less that $100.00. Altho I do not make quilts for others for $$, as I watched this presentation I wondered how one who does that can compete with that price. Like I said, one was such a cute combo of colors/design I was really tempted, then I slapped myself!!!!!!!!!

    I'm guessing the fabrics are maybe a dollar a yard over yonder (whereever that is) and the labor is less than a dollar an hour.

    NOTHING TO COMPARE TO WHAT FOLKS HERE DO!
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  5. #5
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewingsuz View Post
    Oh Jan , you are so knowledgable about these things. I am glad you are here to share what you know. thanks
    Thank you, Suzanne. I've just been around a long time in an environment that was very big in the quilting world (Texas) and have just managed to soak up and retain a lot of quilting trivia, LOL!

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  6. #6
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    But, please remember how these are made....often in slave labor camps overseas. The fabrics are knockoffs, the patterns are knockoffs. ALL of this imported quilts business started in the very early 1990s when the Smithsonian Institution SOLD patterns of our heritage quilts - including those of renowned slave quilter Harriette Powers - to an import company who then started mass producing them in very poor quality and selling at ridiculously low prices. Our American heritage art, on the import market, devalued and mass produced!

    Karey Bresenham who started the Houston International Quilt Festival, started a petition against this (Oh I can't even think of a word for it!) disaster, demanding that no more such items be sold by the Institute, and took it to Congress, where the heinous action was stopped.

    From that point, the overseas manufacturer had to develop their own patterns and print more of their own fabric designs, no longer copying Jinny Beyer's and others designs. Also from that point, slowly the laborers began to improve their quilting skills. But the quality was still not comparable to quilts being produced by individual artists, and their sale continued to devalue to work our quilters are doing in the public's eye.

    If we continue to support this particular importing of quilts by buying them or failing to advise others of this travesty of production, then we can not complain when we find it difficult to sell our own work for a fair price.

    Jan in VA
    Thanks Jan.....now it all makes sense. A friend of mine showed me an inexpensive "handmade/ handquilted quilt" she bought. I was shocked at the "toe catchers" quilting and when I looked at the package label it stated "imported". The fabric was super thin and after the second washing it fell apart. It brought to mind what my grandmother use to say, "Sometimes you have to spend money to save money."
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

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