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Thread: So once you pre-wash your fabric.. how do you get it to be stiff again for cutting?

  1. #26
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    I can see pre-washing for quilts or for other projects what will be washed a fair bit, but what about making purses/totes? I have been making lots of them, and have not pre-washed the fabrics. I also like working with them when they have some body, but hate taking the time to pre-wash and starch etc. When I get a new fabric, I want to start cutting - NOW!! Do others on the board who make totes and bags for sale, pre wash??

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groucho View Post
    Katmom, I iron the fabric when it is cool and damp. If the fabric is too wet, I'll put it in the dryer for a few minutes first.

    Here is a link to an article that describes Anita's starching technique.
    Thanks for the link! Is it safe to assume you still need to press the damp fabric with the up and down method and not side to side ? Thanks for your help!

  3. #28
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    If you have not done it in the past no need to start now, I think it is a waste of my time. I did try it and it makes the fabric limp so then you have to starch it. So if you don't do it and it has worked in the past continue. Just wash with color guard when you wash it.

  4. #29
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    I hang dry my fabric on a drying rack or shower curtain rod. I don't totally dry my good cotton tees either in the dryer either. Just enough to get most of the wrinkles out, and then dry on a rack. I come from the old school of laundry, I don't like soft limp clothes. With Air drying, the cotton fabric holds a shape better,and then after drying I spray starch it. If the fabric is thinner, I use liquid (blue) starch and water in the sink, and drip dry it outside on the rack. Love the smell of fresh air dried fabric.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  5. #30
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    I don't. I wash it with detergent (but no fabric softener), line dry it, and iron it. I have not had any problems.

  6. #31
    Super Member Bonbonary's Avatar
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    Gosh, I haven't thought about sprinkling and refrigerating clothes for years. That's what my grandmother used to do and that was when there was no such thing a permanent press. I just thought it was because she had sprinkled all the clothes and simply ran out of time for ironing everything.

  7. #32
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    Starch, starch and more starch. I like the way Leah Day does it. Spray one side, let it sit to soak in and then iron the other side. Then repeat by spraying that side, let it soak in and iron the other side. I find I don't scorch the starch this way and it doesn't get flaky.
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katmom View Post
    Thanks for the link! Is it safe to assume you still need to press the damp fabric with the up and down method and not side to side ? Thanks for your help!
    I tend to iron the fabric using the up and down method, but I'm not sure that you have to. Cheers :-)

  9. #34
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Honestly, unless you are cutting small pieces of fabric, you just cut. There is no need for starch or anything else. You are simply used to the habit of having that stiffness. Most quilters cut without starching first.

    For small pieces, yes, I like to use starch (I'm trying out Mary Ellen's clear non-starch this week).

    Yes, I'm one of those who doesn't prewash fabrics. Mostly out of laziness. I just don't feel compelled to do so unless I'm doing a swap or using white as a background fabric.

    Note to poster: If I were making products for sale, I would prewash and starch.

  10. #35
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    What do you do with the fabric after you have put it in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator? do you do a yard at a time or a piece at a time?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by suemolitor View Post
    What do you do with the fabric after you have put it in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator? do you do a yard at a time or a piece at a time?
    I starch whatever I think I'll need for a particular project. I usually don't bother with anything smaller than a fat quarter. I just spray starch smaller pieces, often multiple times.

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