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Thread: Starching little pieces; slick trick

  1. #26
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    We used waxed paper to clean all our irons all my life . It also makes the iron slicker to move. It works.

  2. #27
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Quilters are genious at problem solving. Great piece of genious!
    peace
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  3. #28
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    QUESTION: any pro or con advice on irons with shiny steel ironing surface versus non-stick ??

  4. #29
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Wax paper also works great for lubricating light bulbs, makes them easier to twist into the lamp. I've always liked to use parchment for ironing.

    Also - I believe the only major difference between Best Press and regular spray starch is that Best Press has surfactants that help it absorb into the fabric faster. It still contains starch. I use non-aerosol Niagra spray starch and have found that if I simply let it soak into the fabric for a minute or two, I don't get any scorching or flakes.
    Last edited by Peckish; 10-28-2012 at 09:32 PM.

  5. #30
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    Keep in mind that bugs like starch. If you are not going to finish your quilt right away and it is going to be stored for a while, you should think twice about leaving starch in your fabrics. I prefer to use sizing instead.

  6. #31
    Super Member Yooper32's Avatar
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    I use a regular kitchen towel, (not terry-cloth), on my ironing board to put pieces to starch with Best Press. When it gets stiff as a board, toss in wash and your are ready to go again. All the rest of your laundry load has got the hickups, lol.
    Yooper32 aka: Donna B

  7. #32
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    My mother taught me to use the wax paper with table salt on it to clean the bottom of my iron. The mix of the salt and wax from the paper did a good job. Of course you have to consider the salt mess and not spread it all over the room floor.
    Have a blessed day.

    Linda

  8. #33
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Wow - great idea - love the light bulb ideas
    Love 4 stchen

  9. #34
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    Great idea, I hadn't thought of 'sandwiching' them. Thanks

  10. #35
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    Thanks for the hint!

  11. #36
    Super Member GABBYABBY's Avatar
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    That is a great idea!!! I just might have to try that one for sure.

  12. #37
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    What one can't think of someone else can. Thanks for the great tip.

  13. #38
    Senior Member sew4nin's Avatar
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    My kids also think wax paper is for slides and the bottom of sleds in the winter. I still have a neighbor that loves to tell that my kids taught her kids to wax their slide! I never though about using it on my iron. Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    It is annoying to keep the pieces from sticking to the iron. I'll use this tip a lot. My mother used old bread wrappers to have her iron glide over clothes. They use to be coated in wax. Just iron the wax paper. The wax isn't a problem on the iron or fabric. And the cereal box bags were very thick wax paper. We saved the cereal bags to make the playground slide slick and we would zip down it fast as lightening! My kids thought wax paper was for slides. LOL. I need to slide again for fun, if there is big slide left in the playgrounds today.

  14. #39
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    I thought of parchment paper rather than waxed paper. I don't like the idea of getting wax on my fabric. Thanks for tip, I'm moving my parchment paper from kitchen to ironing board. That way, when I see it I'll remember to use it.

  15. #40
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlwheart View Post
    I thought of parchment paper rather than waxed paper. I don't like the idea of getting wax on my fabric. Thanks for tip, I'm moving my parchment paper from kitchen to ironing board. That way, when I see it I'll remember to use it.
    There really isn't hardly any wax left on the paper by the time I use it for this but I can understand your concern, so much work goes into these little piece jobs a person surely wouldn't want to ruin them!

  16. #41
    Senior Member antylu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lclang View Post
    Keep in mind that bugs like starch. If you are not going to finish your quilt right away and it is going to be stored for a while, you should think twice about leaving starch in your fabrics. I prefer to use sizing instead.
    Altho I like the sizing; in this particular pattern everything has to be so perfect to match as there are so many points where the sashing comes together with log cabins, that is why I went to the heavier starch; I usually keep moth stuff in my linen closets etc. as I have lots of antique wools and linens, I haven't had any trouble with any of my starched linens. Thanks for warning tho, appreciate it.

  17. #42
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    THank you for the tip. I will have to try that

  18. #43
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    Years ago my mother ironed over the then waxed bread wrappers to make the iron slide easier. No you are not waxing the fabric. She is starching it but putting it between 2 waxed paper sheets to iron it dry, if I read her note correctly.

  19. #44
    Senior Member cassiemae's Avatar
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    How neat is that######Thanks
    "BIG SKY COUNTRY"

  20. #45
    Super Member cherrio's Avatar
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    that is so helpful!! gonna write that in my quilting notebook
    thanks!
    You never stand taller than when you stoop to help a child.

  21. #46
    Senior Member diamondee's Avatar
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    I don' t know about wax for an iron, does it work like a polish so it glides over the fabric? what got me is the 1/2 inch log cabins. WOW
    ​We can't help everyone, But everyone can help someone.

  22. #47
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    Thanks for the great tip.

  23. #48
    Senior Member kyquiltlover1942's Avatar
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    My Mother (91 yrs.) has used wax paper on her iron for years. If it had a starch build up, she puts salt on the wax paper.
    Thanks for the hint, this will go ion my hint folder.

  24. #49
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltinglady-1 View Post
    My mother taught me to use the wax paper with table salt on it to clean the bottom of my iron. The mix of the salt and wax from the paper did a good job. Of course you have to consider the salt mess and not spread it all over the room floor.
    My mom taught me to do it with any kind of paper, usually newspaper, with the salt. Then, just take a clean cloth to wipe it down and give the iron a couple shots of steam to clean out the holes. I admit, until I started buying sole plate cleaner (Dritz Iron Off) at Joann's, with a coupon, I cleaned my irons that way.

  25. #50
    Super Member jmabby's Avatar
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    Sharing tips as you did is what makes great quilters, most like you love to share. Thanks

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