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Susan Schamber method

Susan Schamber method

Old 03-13-2011, 04:14 AM
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I make mostly large throws to twin sized quilts and have only managed to have one roll up nicely on the boards that she uses. I saw someone's post (sorry...don't remember whose) saying she wrapped flannel on her boards and thought, "AHA! THAT must be the trick!" But...no :( Seems every time I try to roll the backing or top on the boards, they crinkle, or have some weird random crease form in the fabric and no amount of smoothing, rolling and unrolling seems to cure it. When I layer my quilt the normal way on my table, it all works fine, but it'd be so much slicker her way. Am I the only one who has issues with this method? The one time it worked, it was awesome.
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:00 AM
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I did this method on a quilt recently that was 104x110. I actually wasn't able to do exactly like she did though. I did the backing and the topping separately at first. Taped material down say every 10" across the board and then had to have dh help me in the rolling up process. Did the top the same way and then was able to sandwich together which worked out great!

Since this was so big I even spray basted, before hand basting. LOL Didn't want that puppy shifting anywhere! I didn't roll the batting though, I just sort of flopped it forward, sprayed the backing, brought it forward and smoothed it out and then spray basted and then unrolled the top and then hand basted.

Then machine quilted on my DSM. Really worked out wonderfully and no puckers! :thumbup:
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:20 AM
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I've used Sharon's method and it's wonderful. The only think I can think of is if your top isn't completely square, of course there will be creases or wrinkles when you roll it. I can't think of what to do about that other than squaring your top.
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Old 03-13-2011, 06:25 AM
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Hi,

This is very LONG.

It's my understanding that the bottom/backing and top ARE to be first rolled onto SEPARATE boards. This was a bit difficult to see in her video as she used the same color of fabric for both the backing and top samples. It does make it easier to use painter's tape and tape the fabric when first starting to roll onto each board. With a very large quilt it might be helpful to have someone help when first rolling the fabrics onto EACH board. They are then turned around with the boards at an arms+ length away.

When rolling the fabric on the boards keep the board laid flat on the table and just flip, then pull against the fabric, checking to be sure the fabric looks smooth across the board. This is where she commented that you could iron out any wrinkles or bumps that appear. I believe you also would iron the wrinkles as you unwrapped each section from each board, the backing and the top.

I have also heard where some have wrapped very loosely the batting around a board to make it easier to keep off of the floor, but leave a lot of slack as you progress through the process. You might be able to put a couple of chairs on the other side of the table where the rest of the batting could lay without being on the floor.

Another thought would be (with a very large quilt) to wrap the completed hand basted section very loosely onto another board. This would prevent the entire quilt from laying in your lap or on the floor. You might be able to put a chair at each end of the table (with a couple of large phone books to raise above your lap height) to hold the ends of the board. Another thought would be to make a sling attached at each end of the table that would hold the end of the board where you are wrapping the completed hand basted sandwiched quilt. I hope these ideas makes sense.

With regards to the spray basting, if the batting was loosely wrapped on a board it could be lifted forward to sit on the boards as you move the quilt forward on the table. Then the backing is unwrapped a short ways and smoothed out. This is when you would lightly spray the backing which is the wrong side up, the unwrap the batting, smooth it out and make sure it is smooth and there are no extra threads, etc. You can very lightly spray the batting. Next comes unrolling the top making sure to carefully smooth it out across the entire section before hand basting this section. The sling method would be useful to hold the batting loosely wrapped on it's own board on the opposite side of the table away from where you sit.

The creases are formed from not getting the same tension on the fabric as you wrap the fabric around the board. What may help this is to first tape the fabric to the board with painter's tape. It may also prove helpful to get some help if you have a very large (wide) quilt that you working on. Lay the board on the tape and flip as it stays on the table.

Several questions at this time: Did you pre-wash, then iron and starch the backing? Did you iron your top? Many have used the new product Best Press on the top for preparation before quilting. Some battings need to be pre-treated as well.

This flannel trick might work with some changes. Was the flannel just a sleeve around the board? It would be best if the flannel was glued directly to the boards. The flannel was meant to help the cotton not slip as rolling onto the boards. The painter's tape does the same thing IMHO.

What type of thread did you use to hand baste with. Sharon made several comments regarding the thread used for basting. One tip she did not make was to try using a curved needle instead of a straight needle.

I think this is one of the best methods to get a quilt basted. It is much easier when quilting than having to deal with removing the pins every time you get into a new section. It is all done on the top of the table, so you don't need to crawl around on the floor.

I wanted to share that there is another table method shown in a You Tube video. It basically starts with the backing layed across a folding table with the middle in the middle of the table. You have to find the exact middle of your backing, then the batting, and then the top. Each additional preparation of the fabric remains the same. It's important to iron and starch the back and top. This method may work better for some.

Thank you for taking the time to read my long reply.

Good luck with your quilting projects.

Pam M
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Old 03-13-2011, 06:47 AM
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Pam,
Thanks for all the info.

I think also that it is helpful to have someone help you turn the boards, especially if it's a large size quilt.

Sharon did a really small quilt - and it wasn't brilliant to use 2 pieces of the same fabric to demonstrate the technique.

But it keeps you off the floor, which is the main consideration. The wall technique is another option.
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Old 03-13-2011, 08:18 AM
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Thank you all for your kind replies. :-) I appreciate all the feedback!

milp04, I have the top on one board, it's my backing that is giving me trouble with the rolling on this quilt. But yes, I have squared both top and backing and they appear to be the same except that my backing is bigger by 4" all sides. I actually stapled the flannel onto my boards, so it isn't slipping (and it is taut and even on my boards). Both backing and top have been washed, pressed and starched. I haven't gotten around to the actual basting part (or the batting) because of my troubles with the darn back. My top is rolled on and it behaved nicely. This is the first time I ever pieced a back because I was trying to use stuff from my stash and not buy more, and it happens to be flannel (but it is starched pretty heavily). Maybe it's a flannel thing. I think I'll end up going back to using binder clips and clamping it to my table. I have Rheumatoid Arthritis so I can't do the floor thing anymore. I just thought I'd try this one more time.

I guess I can do what I need to to sandwich it and just use her basting stitch. I like it so much better than the usual straight stitch.
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Old 03-13-2011, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by minstrel
Maybe it's a flannel thing.
I could see where that would be especially clingy and cause some problems.
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Old 10-25-2011, 02:01 AM
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It's wonderful to have this input!! Thank you. I'm just getting read to use this method in order to finish a wall hanging (embroidered stained glass design) and want it to come out perfectly.
Have a good day!!
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Old 10-25-2011, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by minstrel
I make mostly large throws to twin sized quilts and have only managed to have one roll up nicely on the boards that she uses. I saw someone's post (sorry...don't remember whose) saying she wrapped flannel on her boards and thought, "AHA! THAT must be the trick!" But...no :( Seems every time I try to roll the backing or top on the boards, they crinkle, or have some weird random crease form in the fabric and no amount of smoothing, rolling and unrolling seems to cure it. When I layer my quilt the normal way on my table, it all works fine, but it'd be so much slicker her way. Am I the only one who has issues with this method? The one time it worked, it was awesome.
Mine always have wrinkles or creases and it doesn't make one bit of difference. I just unroll the next width for basting, smooth it out with my hands and baste away. No problem.

The top or backing may look a little rumply (like unironed sheets) but it hand quilts smoothly. I don't know anything about machine quilting, though.
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