Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 159

Thread: Is there a limit as to how ugly a charity quilt can be?

  1. #51
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    Appears to me there needs to be a definitation of "ugly". Is it:
    Color choices
    Pattern choices
    Fabric used
    or......workmanship

    How much does our personal preferences effect the creation of a "non-ugly or ugly" quilt.
    There is a scene in the movie "How To Make An American Quilt" where Anna tells the group "I just don't want to make some ugly quilt". She is referring to color choices and her opinion of what is correct.

    I believe we deny ourselves the pleasure and satisfaction of "charity" by getting too hung up on producing work we may only want in our own homes or what we would give our friends, relatives, children, grandchildren. I do have an issue with the attitude that sloppy work is ok. Good and servicable workmanship can be produced with what I consider unsuitable supplies and serve the ultimate need.

    If one has a stack of donated trash fabric......sort out what can be used, donate to Goodwill what could be used by others and dump the rest. What may be trash to me just might be someone else's treasure.

    There is a local quilt shop that has a closet where sewists literally dump bags of their unwanted stuff. We periodically sort it out. It contains decorator fabric swatches, fake fur, dressmaking fabric and a lot of quilt fabric.
    The decorator fabric goes to make sleeping bags, fake fur for stuffed bears for the local police, dressmaking fabric to a local church that makes clothing to send overseas.........quilt fabric for quilts and anything not large enough for traditional quilts - get in a pile for string quilt blocks. I just wish we cleaned out more often. Folks need the products we could produce.

    I consider this an exercise in creativity.

  2. #52
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,949
    I only give to charity what I'd want to receive myself. I give things to the Goodwill that are in good condition only. Junk gets pitched. I do charity quilts, too. And I make sure they are sturdy and washable. No, they aren't heirlooms, very simple in fact. But I try to picture the receiver and I hope they get joy from my donation. Unsuitable fabric donations never get used--they get offered to my 4H sewing members or they get passed along to the Goodwill.

  3. #53
    Super Member Happy Tails's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Timberlea, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,275
    Sewmary, I couldn't agree with you more. Let me tell you a short little story. Many years ago, I had the opportunity to work at a house for teenagers while the original secretary was out on leave. I was asked if I would mind dressing the way the kids did, in other words jeans and tshirts not a business suit. It made the kids feel like I was one of them. The other thing was they took turns cooking lunch and I was asked to join them. Having said that, I got to know these kids fairly well. Their stories were very very sad (unfortunately my makeup doesn't allow me to not have very sad feelings for these kids) Anyway..this one day a huge truckload of clothing arrived from donators in the "Southend" (rich area of Halifax) What came out of those boxes was absolutely disgusting!!! (They had invited me to sit around the circle with them while they excitedly awaited to see what would fit them). One of the teenage girls turned to me with tears in her eyes and said why do these people think we could possibly wear any of this stuff. It broke my heart to see how devasted they were with the crap that was expected to make them happy. I don't have a lot, but when I donate to charity, it's still almost like new. So my point is, really think about how someone feels who isn't as fortunate as we are and how insulted they are with the crap we so kindly donate so we can get rid of it. Sorry to be so long winded but you would have had to see how devasted these kids were and how hopeless they felt.
    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    I view my charity quilts just like any other quilt I would make. In my world, if that charity quilt is not good enough to give to a family memeber then it is not good enought for anyone else. I don't believe that people who need charity deserve second hand quality or any old thing.

  4. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    573
    I agree wholeheartedly that charity quilts should be of a quality that will last, but I do not make "ugly" anything to give away, if I wouldn't use it in my own home, I don't make it for someone else.

  5. #55
    Senior Member DMotyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    482
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wow! Sounds like your group needs to clean their own house... That being said I have seen on this board where double-knits were great backings b/c they are warm. I can't imagine wanting to make wall-hangings as donation quilts so if the fabric cannot be washed, it is not useful to your cause. I also think it might be time to make guidelines for people who are hoping to donate fabric to your group. This will prevent future discussions. Donors could be suggested other venues to donate fabric/table clothes/sheets etc. I realize that does not solve the issue at hand now but maybe it would help your group define what they do actually want to do when fabric/goods are donated to them.
    If you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love. :-)
    Donna

  6. #56
    Senior Member pasolovers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Crystal River,Fl
    Posts
    437
    I would not give an "ugly" quilt to anyone but a color blind dog!!!!! How could anyone even make an ugly quilt and feel comfortable with giving it away...I love quilting way to much to disrespect quilts like that!!!
    BTW I am not the quilting police nor would of one of my quilts come close to qualifying for a show...I just love the craft
    Dee

    Today is the day the Lord has made..Let us be glad and rejoice in it!!


  7. #57
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,895
    I think it depends on the recipient. A quilt meant to comfort a cancer patient or a sick child, should be as nice as you can make it. A quilt going to a homeless person who is sleeping on the ground - well if I were in that situation I would NOT want a pretty quilt as I would be afraid of wrecking it. I think the Ugly Quilt Project is a good thing.

    About the "don't make it too nice so the recipient won't sell it" sentiment that was mentioned in regards to quilts going overseas - well what if that person REALLY needs the money rather than the quilt? I thought that once we gave a gift, it was out of our hands?

    I have posted before about a quilt guild in our area, that many years ago was making baby quilts to send to eastern Europe where children were dying of AIDS because hospitals were re-using needles and such. I wanted to SCREAM and say - Sell the quilts here, raise some money, and send them some medical supplies!!! so MORE kids won't get sick!!!

  8. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Brownwood TX
    Posts
    737
    This was shared at guild one day. A charity quilt that was thought to be hideous by the people in the group was chosen first by a little guy, who had many to chose, from because he loved the colors. You never know.
    Robin in TX

  9. #59
    Senior Member jeank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Lapeer, Michigan
    Posts
    722
    I have had to bite my tongue not to say anything when members of my charity group bring in donations.

    It is not so much the colors as the quilting.

    A few lines across is not enough to hold it together in my opinion.

    A childs quilt is going to get dragged around and laundered. These will look like an old sack after washing it. I dont do fancy quilting, but at least stitch in the ditch no further than 4-6" apart. Some have it 10-12", that is not going to hold up. It may look ok now freshly stitched.
    Jean in MI

  10. #60
    Senior Member luana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    656
    Quote Originally Posted by Iwantasew View Post
    Some charities perfer ulgy quilts so they don't end up on the black market. The quilts are more likely to get to the people they are inteded to help.
    I agree with this comment. In some third world countries, these quilts may be used underfoot or on the roof. There are stories of how the nice or pretty quilts never make it to their destinations because they have value on the black market. An ugly quilt may keep the sun off hungry children as well as a pretty one. The goal should be to make the quilt and get it to where it is needed. Keep up the good work.

  11. #61
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Orchard Park, NY (near Buffalo, which is near Niagara Falls)
    Posts
    4,199
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thank you for all the suggestions and perspectives expressed!

    I think (being new) that I will start small... by buying several packs of new needles for the ladies to use to tie through the quilts.

    Several folks object to the double-knits, because they are too hard to sew through. Well, if you look at their stash of needles, a good portion of them have corrosion on the sides. Not being smooth, of course they won't go through the fabric well! And some of the other ones are more for working with yarn, as they have blunt tips instead of sharp. Of course, those won't go through the knits!

  12. #62
    Member georgiamarbles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    20
    MY grandma use to quilt anything she found...from knits to old clothing... i now have 3 of her quilts as some of my most prized possessions...so the beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

  13. #63
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,764
    Quote Originally Posted by wolph33 View Post
    I believe that there is no such thing as too ugly when donating to needy people.As long as it is decent fabric that will not fall apart after a few washings.I have donated many quilts for sick children-some are not my best works-they were all well received by the kids.Kids are not so picky about the quilts like we are.They are grateful that some one made the effort to think of them and make them a quilt.just mu opinion anyway-sure there will be others.
    I totally agree.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  14. #64
    Senior Member coldquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    northern Minnesota
    Posts
    428
    I do work for a fabulous charity and we make about 100-150 baby quilts per year to be donated to hospitals throughout our state. Our guidelines are this: must be 100% cotton and anything that is so thin that we can see through it, we give it to someone else to use for another purpose. Part of the dilema is that you have to think about how these quilts are going to be cared for and how they are going to be washed. You don't want to go through all that work to have them falling apart in the first year for example. These are the guidelines we follow and hopefully it will help you and your group.
    Michelle

  15. #65
    Senior Member star619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    855
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I go by the rule of: I give charilty quilts that I wouldn't be ashamed to put my name on. The dogs go to the resale shop (Goodwill, St. Vincent, Salvation Army) where I figure customers can make their own choice if they want to buy it.
    Common sense from Canada! The time spent arguing over this issue could have been spent working.Remember the old adage:"A giraffe was a horse built by a committee".

  16. #66
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    16,675
    What may be 'ugly' so some, others will think it is 'beautiful'.
    Grandma of 5 beautiful grand kids, 4 crazy cats & 1 dog!

  17. #67
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,524
    ........................
    The quilts are all going overseas. We're not actually quilting them, just tying through with perle cotton (or similar). I don't believe all the fabrics would wash succesfully, but the point was mentioned that if the quilts are just to serve as a wall or a rug, they might not ever get washed anyway........................
    ***********************************

    I'd take any fabric that isn't strong enough for washing and get rid of it somehow, at least separate it from the washable------------Personally, I'd be very upset if I got a quilt thinking I could wash it when soiled and then find our the thing fell apart.

    When our group did charity quilts, we had some knits and such. We always paired the knit with a good woven and ended up with some cute quilts.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  18. #68
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bosque County, Texas
    Posts
    3,028
    Think about this. When charities set up companies to help women work their way out of poverty in these 3rd world countries, these women produce some of the most beautiful handwork, woven fabric and other things in the world. Their items are prized.And these are the same women we send ugly quilts to because they have had a natural disaster or a civil war. We should respect them. They are still artists even if a natural disaster or a civil war has hit.Look at the National Geographic Christmas
    Catalog and see their work.
    Last edited by TanyaL; 01-18-2012 at 07:01 AM.

  19. #69
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,524
    Another simple question-------------------------

    DEFINE UGLY!

    Remember the UGLY fabrics on this board? Some I loved. Some I hated but others loved.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  20. #70
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,524
    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite Fabrics View Post
    Thank you for all the suggestions and perspectives expressed!

    I think (being new) that I will start small... by buying several packs of new needles for the ladies to use to tie through the quilts.

    Several folks object to the double-knits, because they are too hard to sew through. Well, if you look at their stash of needles, a good portion of them have corrosion on the sides. Not being smooth, of course they won't go through the fabric well! And some of the other ones are more for working with yarn, as they have blunt tips instead of sharp. Of course, those won't go through the knits!
    I find double knit easy to sew thru. Are your ladies perhaps using sharps for the double knit? They need ball point needles, kind of like the counted cross stitch needles. If a sharp hits the "string" of a double knit it wants to go thru which is hard to do. If a ball point hits the "string" it will slide to one side or the other and go thru easily.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  21. #71
    Member Browngirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    65
    Blog Entries
    2
    I belong to a small group of five (that includes me) we are a club of sorts. We make charity quilts and we use fabric we buy, have in our homes and donated fabric. There are all sorts of fabric. We try to keep like fabric together. We also use unknown fabrics to try out new blocks or as samples for new techniques. We are not an experience group of quilters we are a fun group of quilters who do very decent work. We vote when we don't agree on some things but we seem to all agree on this give as you would to receive. You give junk expect junk. Just my two cents. icee

  22. #72
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    666
    I agree with Tartan.

  23. #73
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    11,204
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    ugly is a personal thing- some things i think are just hidious you might absolutely love-
    as long as the fabrics are quality fabrics that will hold up- they are usable- check with the charity though- all those charities out there have their own (requirements/rules) concerning what is acceptable and what is not---mostly though they need to be cotton, washable, durable- functional- if you would not give it to someone you know-you should not give it to a stranger- they deserve the same consideration as anyone you know
    Right on. BrendaK
    Be kind to yourself, by being kind to others. When you help others you help yourself.

  24. #74
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    96
    I have seen quilts made in our group that would have no appeal to me whatsoever, but if the fabric is good quality and the workmanship is good that's fine. Remember "beauty is in the eye of the beholder".

  25. #75
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    Thank you all. While this subject has been long and with many many opinions I have found it refreshing, enlightening, informative and educational. In fact it just may have given me a new lecture on the subject. We all have our own opinions about the subject and reading through the postings has given me anew perspective on the subject. How would a leture with the title "Use Up or Suffer the Consequencies" sound.
    Consequences might be: guilt at thinking somone might be cold; waste not want not; filling the land fill and causing environmental problems, etc etc.....just thinking here. Idle hands must be active. amd ot goes on. But then I have to drag a plastic bag full of these donations in for show and tell and then show samples made from each of the unwanted or ugly stuff.

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.