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Thread: Warm and Natural vs. Cotton/Polyester Batting!

  1. #26
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    Do you all soak the batting before using it as the package suggests? I looked at it for the first time at Joann's this past weekend and didn't buy it because I didn't want to have to soak and towel dry it before using it.

  2. #27
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joeysnana
    Do you all soak the batting before using it as the package suggests? I looked at it for the first time at Joann's this past weekend and didn't buy it because I didn't want to have to soak and towel dry it before using it.
    Which batting?

    I have heard of soaking Warm n Natural to soften it for hand quilting, and have heard of soaking Fairfield cotton to remove sizing that makes hand quilting more difficult.

    I don't think it's ever necessary to soak a batting that will be machine quilted unless you *really* do not any *any* shrinkage in a cotton batting. Most cotton battings have only minimal shrinking anyway. Poly batts don't shrink at all.

  3. #28
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by Joeysnana
    Do you all soak the batting before using it as the package suggests? I looked at it for the first time at Joann's this past weekend and didn't buy it because I didn't want to have to soak and towel dry it before using it.
    Which batting?

    I have heard of soaking Warm n Natural to soften it for hand quilting, and have heard of soaking Fairfield cotton to remove sizing that makes hand quilting more difficult.

    I don't think it's ever necessary to soak a batting that will be machine quilted unless you *really* do not any *any* shrinkage in a cotton batting. Most cotton battings have only minimal shrinking anyway. Poly batts don't shrink at all.
    I would be hand quilting, so I guess I would want to soften it?

  4. #29
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    [/quote]
    I would be hand quilting, so I guess I would want to soften it?[/quote]

    I would buy a batting that is good for hand quilting without being soaked. Hobbs 80/20 and Quilter's Dream Request weight are two of the most highly recommended batts for hand quilting. I personally would not want to hand quilt Warm n Natural, even if it was soaked, because the scrim makes it more difficult to hand needle.

  5. #30
    Super Member ScubaK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Different quilters prefer different battings. Also, different uses call for different battings.

    I make mostly quilts to be used; I stopped using Warm n Natural when I realized its drape is stiffer than other cotton batts. It would be my first choice for a wallhanging, though, because of its stability.

    I like the look and longevity of antique quilts with cotton batting, so I use the very traditional Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon 100% cotton batting in almost all of my quilts now. The most I will go on the polyester side is Hobbs 80/20 (80% cotton/20% polyester) and only in that brand. In my experience, polyester is more prone to bearding and turning into little balls with heavy use, although this probably depends a lot on the specific brand of batting. One bad experience was enough to turn me off on polyester.

    I am not tempted to use bamboo because I have read that the chemicals used to process the bamboo are very toxic, even though bamboo is touted as being an environmentally friendly and renewable resource.
    Thankyou for this info!
    K

  6. #31
    Super Member ScubaK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Different quilters prefer different battings. Also, different uses call for different battings.

    I make mostly quilts to be used; I stopped using Warm n Natural when I realized its drape is stiffer than other cotton batts. It would be my first choice for a wallhanging, though, because of its stability.

    I like the look and longevity of antique quilts with cotton batting, so I use the very traditional Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon 100% cotton batting in almost all of my quilts now. The most I will go on the polyester side is Hobbs 80/20 (80% cotton/20% polyester) and only in that brand. In my experience, polyester is more prone to bearding and turning into little balls with heavy use, although this probably depends a lot on the specific brand of batting. One bad experience was enough to turn me off on polyester.

    I am not tempted to use bamboo because I have read that the chemicals used to process the bamboo are very toxic, even though bamboo is touted as being an environmentally friendly and renewable resource.
    Thankyou for this info!
    K

  7. #32
    Super Member ScubaK's Avatar
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    I have to add...
    All of this is of great help to me. I have used mostly poly batting in my quilts. I used what was cheap when I started out on this adventure.
    I hesitate now to find another batting...I machine quilt with a domestic machine (no long arm) and my quilts aren't any larger than a queen.
    If I wash my fabric how will the batting (warm and Natural, etc) affect my quilt with shrinkage and such???
    Will it make it all wrinkly? Should I wash the batting first as well? How do I do that????
    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Kirsten

  8. #33
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    I don't know anything about how toxic the processing of bamboo is, but I do know, from living in cotton growing country, that the defoliants that are sprayed on it before harvest are horrible, so if that is the reason you wouldn't use bamboo, you might want to rethink using cotton also. We also know that the making of polyester is a toxic process. I don't know what the conscientious consumer should do. Hobbs does make an organic cotton batting, I assume that means it is grown and processed safely. We probably need to check with the companies to see just how toxic the processing, etc.. really is.

  9. #34
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaK
    I have to add...
    All of this is of great help to me. I have used mostly poly batting in my quilts. I used what was cheap when I started out on this adventure.
    I hesitate now to find another batting...I machine quilt with a domestic machine (no long arm) and my quilts aren't any larger than a queen.
    If I wash my fabric how will the batting (warm and Natural, etc) affect my quilt with shrinkage and such???
    Will it make it all wrinkly? Should I wash the batting first as well? How do I do that????
    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Kirsten
    I like my batting to shrink a little. This is what makes antique quilts look "antique" -- sort of soft and gentle.

    I don't prewash fabrics, so the fabrics and batting shrink together. The effect will be much the same even if you prewash fabrics; there is so little shrinkage that any difference between the batting and the fabric won't matter.

    I personally wouldn't try to preshrink a batting. Most shrinkage occurs in the dryer, and most battings cannot withstand being tumbled in a dryer by itself while wet. (Maybe WnN can because it's needlepunched through scrim; not sure about that one.) The reason to presoak a batting is usually to make it easier to hand quilt. Presoaking WnN makes it softer for hand quilting; presoaking some of the cotton battings that have resin binders removes the resins that can make needles stick.

    If you are unsure about any batting, you can test it yourself. Quilt a piece and then wash it to see what the result is. You can try prewashing and drying the batting. I just wouldn't recommend putting a non-needlepunched batting in the dryer ,as it will probably disintegrate and create a mess in your dryer.

    In your situation, I would recommend using Hobbs 80/20 batting. It will look and feel very similar to the poly battings you are used to, and it does not need any pre-soaking. It is good for both machine quilting and hand quilting, and shrinks very little.

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